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[PA Comic] Friday, September 20, 2013 - The Tithe, Part Seven

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    PedroAsaniPedroAsani Brotherhood of the Squirrel [Prime]Registered User regular
    From what I understand, based on the comics on the site and the Cryptozoics, the three factions have loose affiliations based on their mandates.

    Lookouts: protect the village from the things in the forest.
    Daughters: protect the forest from everything. Sometimes that means the people in the village.
    Thornwatch: protect the vulnerable from the village and the forest.

    So sometimes their goals align, sometimes they are opposed.

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    wonderpugwonderpug Registered User regular
    Chris FOM wrote: »
    Interesting I took the "don't die near the river" more as a reference to the magic of the Eyrewood. If she dies near the river the forest can reach out to her, take her somewhere to be cured, possibly work its magic on the body, or even cure it on its own. Dying elsewhere makes sure her body stays put.

    While it's possible the above posters are correct that he doesn't want her chewed poisonberries to get into the river, but just having a corpse rotting in your water supply is bad ju-ju aplenty.

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    LucascraftLucascraft Registered User regular
    edited September 2013
    My interpretation is much different that most of you.

    My interpretation is that the hooded guy is using reverse psychology on her, to help her accept her fate.

    He's saying "If you don't like the lot you've been given, go kill yourself." He's telling her that there's no other escape other than death. She needs to buck up and accept who she is now.

    *edit* and the "don't die near the river" remark is part of his snarky, sarcastic reverse psychology. He's saying "if you're going to off yourself, don't make a mess for the rest of us to have to deal with".

    Lucascraft on
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    GaslightGaslight Registered User regular
    Lucascraft wrote: »
    My interpretation is much different that most of you.

    My interpretation is that the hooded guy is using reverse psychology on her, to help her accept her fate.

    He's saying "If you don't like the lot you've been given, go kill yourself." He's telling her that there's no other escape other than death. She needs to buck up and accept who she is now.

    *edit* and the "don't die near the river" remark is part of his snarky, sarcastic reverse psychology. He's saying "if you're going to off yourself, don't make a mess for the rest of us to have to deal with".

    I agree with you this is a definite possibility, and I think I said so in my post above. I don't think this and him sincerely wanting her to die, or at least not caring if she does, are mutually exclusive though. "You want a way out? Here's a way out. Choice is yours, I couldn't care less what happens to your kind, just don't poison the river."

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    ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor changed Registered User regular
    edited September 2013
    Gaslight wrote: »
    SkullKing wrote: »
    She is telling her to eat a lot of poison, in order to die as she is instead of becoming a daughter. If she days in/near the river her corpse can poison it, causing others to die.

    This pretty much makes sense to me. The three Lookouts, as others have said, seem to differ in their views of the Daughters or at least their methods of "helping" Hanna with her "problem." All three know there's nothing they can do to stop or reverse her transformation, but...

    Scar-Eye doesn't have anything more to say about it. She's a Daughter, she's in the woods, it's not their affair.

    The Greenheart take the approach of trying to comfort and encourage her.

    And the Blade, whether because of some personal animosity for the Daughters or maybe from some kind of reverse psychology "tough love" strategy, offers her one way out if she really wants it: suicide. I am a little unclear on why he uses a different name for the poisonous berries when they both know what they are, though.

    So basically we have (Indifferent cop) - (Good cop) - (Bad cop).

    Perhaps Indifferent Cop is just Beaurocrat Cop.

    She filled/tied out the I'm Lost form/knot.

    She is not lost: problem solved.

    Does she need help? Well that's a different form, and he doesn't have it with him.

    He's the Walter to Greenheart's Dude: he's the only one who gives a shit about the rules.

    ArbitraryDescriptor on
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    dredseldredsel Registered User new member
    You know, the personalities of the Thornwatch were reviewed by Tycho in the news post for The Tithe, part 6:

    Beard: Abstract Thinker, not really that helpful in the real world.
    Greenheart: Tries to be super-supportive but can get annoying, and is not actually that helpful.
    Steve: Not really specified, but sounds like just evil/mean.

    So my read on this was that he genuinely scorns the girl and/or Daughters in general, and is telling her to go FOAD.

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    TAFKAPTAFKAP Warrior-Jumper Registered User regular
    Maybe this is why the Thornwatch aren't loved by Lookouts. You ask them for help, and they give you different kind of help than you expected...

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    NamrokNamrok Registered User regular
    TAFKAP wrote: »
    Maybe this is why the Thornwatch aren't loved by Lookouts. You ask them for help, and they give you different kind of help than you expected...

    I get the impression Thornwatch is sort of a last resort?

    When no one else is capable of helping you, you gotta wonder what your last resort is really going to do?

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    GaslightGaslight Registered User regular
    TAFKAP wrote: »
    Maybe this is why the Thornwatch aren't loved by Lookouts. You ask them for help, and they give you different kind of help than you expected...

    The Thornwatch aren't loved by the Lookouts because as far as we know they're made up entirely of Lookouts who've broken their oaths and other people who've abandoned the (seemingly somewhat arcane and arbitrary) codes of the society the Lookouts protect. The Thornwatch are seen as a threat to the order of things.

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    DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    I figure the reason he uses a different word for the berries is their greater understanding of the forest than the village. The village only knows that the stuff kills you, so they call it one thing based on that. The Thornwatch knows something else about the berries related to some monster shit they do, so it gets called by a "real" name, rather than the commoner name.

    What is this I don't even.
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    JackdawGinJackdawGin Engineer New YorkRegistered User regular
    TAFKAP wrote: »
    Maybe this is why the Thornwatch aren't loved by Lookouts. You ask them for help, and they give you different kind of help than you expected...

    Or, like cats, their definition of "help" is often wrong.

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    KalTorakKalTorak One way or another, they all end up in the Undercity.Registered User regular
    I dunno... his attitudes and intentions are clear, but a proto-Daughter trying kill herself by eating a plant? I could potentially see that backfiring pretty bad, like her flowers turn into poison plants, or she becomes even more botanical than a normal Daughter.

    How do you kill someone that's both a person and a plant? Fire or axes.

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    Adam CasalinoAdam Casalino New York (in my heart)Registered User regular
    TAFKAP wrote: »
    Maybe this is why the Thornwatch aren't loved by Lookouts. You ask them for help, and they give you different kind of help than you expected...

    Don't ask an elf for advice, for they will say both yes and no.

    Sorry that just made me think of that.

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    TofystedethTofystedeth Registered User regular
    JackdawGin wrote: »
    TAFKAP wrote: »
    Maybe this is why the Thornwatch aren't loved by Lookouts. You ask them for help, and they give you different kind of help than you expected...

    Or, like cats, their definition of "help" is often wrong.
    You tie the knot to summon help making your bed.

    You turn around, the three Thornwatch dudes are somehow under the fitted sheet you already put on.

    steam_sig.png
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    Skull2185Skull2185 Registered User regular
    Namrok wrote: »
    I'm not sure where everyone is getting that he's telling her to commit suicide. The berries are clearly poison. But they will scour her system of the flowers growing out of her head.

    They just have the potential side effect of death.

    It's frontier medicine. What are you gonna do?

    "Eat as many as you can, witch." with an extremely unfriendly look on his face. Dude's telling her to kill herself.

    Everyone has a price. Throw enough gold around and someone will risk disintegration.
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    GravenGraven Registered User new member
    OK, so perhaps my comment will just be white noise since everyone is smart and thinks this storyline is truly awesome, but...

    i have to say that the comic where the Thornwatch shows up after she ties the knot...it gave me chills!

    so well done!

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    GabrielGabriel Registered User, ClubPA, Penny Arcade Staff, PAX Staff staff
    edited September 2013
    I love you guys. I can't tell you how happy it makes me to read this discussion. If you want my opinion, PedroAsani nailed it pretty well:

    "Lookouts: protect the village from the things in the forest.
    Daughters: protect the forest from everything. Sometimes that means the people in the village.
    Thornwatch: protect the vulnerable from the village and the forest.

    So sometimes their goals align, sometimes they are opposed."

    You can have many different interactions with a Daughter. They could be positive and they could be very negative. The Warrior is saying "we can't help you" he's not making a judgment call or offering advice. He was called to solve a problem. There is no problem he can solve. end of story.

    The Greenheart is a sort of druid. he has a (compared to a Daughter of the Eyrewood) limited connection to the forest. To him what she is about to go through is probably beautiful. In a way he might even be jealous of the power she's coming into? He knows he cannot "solve" her problem in the way she wants but he (in a condescending way?) is at least trying to comfort her.

    The Blade has probably had bad experiences with Daughters, Mothers or maybe even crones in the past. Imagine if the only Jedi you ever met was Darth Vader. In his opinion she is a witch and he knows better than to interfere but he can't help but offer up his own "advice".

    I love this world so much and I hope that passion comes through in the artwork. Seeing how into it you all are is a real inspiration so thank you.

    Gabriel on
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    RehabRehab Registered User regular
    edited September 2013
    miaAusa wrote: »
    Epp she's a witch!! But she seems so lovely, the plot thickens and yet another cliffhanger
    SkullKing wrote: »
    I believe he is calling her that because she is a daughter.

    Plus she probably weighs about as much as A duck! and is therefore a witch.

    Rehab on
    NNID: Rehab0
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    The Mighty SibhodThe Mighty Sibhod Registered User new member
    Man, it shows that your hearts are really in it. There's something beautiful and bittersweet about the setting, especially in the interactions between the people and natural forces that aren't necessarily cruel, but like nature itself, simply is and sometimes that means people get in the warpath of nature doing its thing, so it can easily be seen as an antagonist. Yet despite the larger-scale themes going on, the stories are essentially personal ones, ones that we as human beings can relate to, like what Hanna is going through.

    Or on the other hand, how her parents will feel when they wake up to find their daughter tithed to the forest so that they can continue to exist peacefully within it. I'd imagine reactions and perceptions about that vary from person to person and town to town, but it can't be one many parents would be happy about. Hell, I know I might say "screw your rules, I'm not gonna be a part of this" and join up with a bunch of renegades if I had a child taken, even if I knew it's probably for the greater good and all that.

    And even then, there's the bittersweet knowledge that your daughter's out there, alive and doing who knows how well? But there's a chance that she's become something wonderful and is perfectly happy too, even though you'll likely never see her again. Emotional stuff, man.

    SibSig.png
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    EvilBadmanEvilBadman DO NOT TRUST THIS MAN Registered User regular
    Gabriel wrote: »
    I love you guys. I can't tell you how happy it makes me to read this discussion. If you want my opinion, PedroAsani nailed it pretty well:

    "Lookouts: protect the village from the things in the forest.
    Daughters: protect the forest from everything. Sometimes that means the people in the village.
    Thornwatch: protect the vulnerable from the village and the forest.

    So sometimes their goals align, sometimes they are opposed."

    You can have many different interactions with a Daughter. They could be positive and they could be very negative. The Warrior is saying "we can't help you" he's not making a judgment call or offering advice. He was called to solve a problem. There is no problem he can solve. end of story.

    The Greenheart is a sort of druid. he has a (compared to a Daughter of the Eyrewood) limited connection to the forest. To him what she is about to go through is probably beautiful. In a way he might even be jealous of the power she's coming into? He knows he cannot "solve" her problem in the way she wants but he (in a condescending way?) is at least trying to comfort her.

    The Steve has probably had bad experiences with Daughters, Mothers or maybe even crones in the past. Imagine if the only Jedi you ever met was Darth Vader. In his opinion she is a witch and he knows better than to interfere but he can't help but offer up his own "advice". Steve-Steve, Steve.

    I love this world so much and I hope that passion comes through in the artwork. Seeing how into it you all are is a real inspiration so thank you.

    Goddammit, I want to play in this world now more than ever.

    FyreWulff wrote: »
    I should note that Badman is fucking awesome
    XBL- Evil Badman; Steam- EvilBadman; Twitter - EvilBadman
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    BucketmanBucketman Call me SkraggRegistered User regular
    Gabe, I also love this world. Give me more of it. Suspend it in liquid form and inject it straight into my veins.

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    Golden YakGolden Yak Burnished Bovine The sunny beaches of CanadaRegistered User regular
    Gabriel wrote: »
    The Blade has probably had bad experiences with Daughters, Mothers or maybe even crones in the past. Imagine if the only Jedi you ever met was Darth Vader.

    This sounds awesome. I think one of these 'crones' may have been the woman who showed up in Lookouts #06 - she certainly wasn't the type to give good impressions.

    H9f4bVe.png
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    Twenty SidedTwenty Sided Registered User regular
    Chris FOM wrote: »
    Interesting I took the "don't die near the river" more as a reference to the magic of the Eyrewood. If she dies near the river the forest can reach out to her, take her somewhere to be cured, possibly work its magic on the body, or even cure it on its own. Dying elsewhere makes sure her body stays put.

    Nah, it just means he doesn't want her body fouling up a potable source of water.

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    zerzhulzerzhul Registered User, Moderator mod
    EvilBadman wrote: »
    Gabriel wrote: »
    I love you guys. I can't tell you how happy it makes me to read this discussion. If you want my opinion, PedroAsani nailed it pretty well:

    "Lookouts: protect the village from the things in the forest.
    Daughters: protect the forest from everything. Sometimes that means the people in the village.
    Thornwatch: protect the vulnerable from the village and the forest.

    So sometimes their goals align, sometimes they are opposed."

    You can have many different interactions with a Daughter. They could be positive and they could be very negative. The Warrior is saying "we can't help you" he's not making a judgment call or offering advice. He was called to solve a problem. There is no problem he can solve. end of story.

    The Greenheart is a sort of druid. he has a (compared to a Daughter of the Eyrewood) limited connection to the forest. To him what she is about to go through is probably beautiful. In a way he might even be jealous of the power she's coming into? He knows he cannot "solve" her problem in the way she wants but he (in a condescending way?) is at least trying to comfort her.

    The Steve has probably had bad experiences with Daughters, Mothers or maybe even crones in the past. Imagine if the only Jedi you ever met was Darth Vader. In his opinion she is a witch and he knows better than to interfere but he can't help but offer up his own "advice". Steve-Steve, Steve.

    I love this world so much and I hope that passion comes through in the artwork. Seeing how into it you all are is a real inspiration so thank you.

    Goddammit, I want to play in this world now more than ever.
    I agree. This has, at least from the outside, become such a tangible place so quickly. First glimpses and now entirely independent but intersecting windows. I also now want to see more of the Forest and the Villages in a more independent light, separate from the perspective of the Lookouts, Daughters, or Thornwatch.

    I'm picturing MMO-style concept art.

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    Katai KiKatai Ki Registered User new member
    I can't help but think that a huge part of defines the way people act in this world is based on miscommunication and a belief that "If it rhymes, it must be true!"

    Really, can we all just sit down and talk it out?

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    HidaO-WinHidaO-Win Registered User new member
    edited September 2013
    In time not recorded by the Great Book a group of Lookout grew to adulthood, betrayed the Edicts and were exiled to the depths of the Great Forest. Today still feared as Soldiers of Firrs and Hawthorns they hide in the wilds and edges of the world. If you have a problem, if nobody else can help and if you know the spell, maybe you can summon the Thornwatch!

    Main thing seems to be, she summoned them for help, each of them is providing some way put, be it acceptance or death. The Eyrewood does not seem like a place rich on mercy and kindness. The trees probably have specially adapted root networks to draw that stuff away.

    HidaO-Win on
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    CartoucheCartouche Registered User new member
    It seems like the flowers keep on growing as you get older. Why does the forest keep needing new daughters? I wonder what happens when they get too old? Do they become flowering trees? That'd be pretty awesome. I can easily imagine a small grove known only to the Daughters, where they go to commune with the sentient flowering trees of their elders.

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    RichardWolfRichardWolf Registered User regular
    When is the movie coming out? I will go see it.

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    eagleagl Registered User regular
    Gabe,

    I know you guys don't read the forums for very good reasons, but thanks for dropping in here. I wanted to say that my young daughter is just starting school, and every day I have pulled up a new Tithe comic I've seen her, struggling to understand the world and her new role in it. Terrifying to be pulled out of the nest, but with tantalizing personal fulfillment if the course is stayed.

    The feels are strong enough to make me want to throw a curse in your general direction, for making the feels so strong. Instead I'll say well done and keep re-reading the story because something new keeps popping out every time I look at them. And also, the art. Wow. You mentioned getting some help with the hands, and that was what popped out to me in the first few parts. The hands are incredibly emotive in the first few panels, suggesting to me both purposeful intent and fearful anticipation. Not sure if that's what you were going for but if so, you nailed it. Every panel, every part. Thx.

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    GoslingGosling Looking Up Soccer In Mongolia Right Now, Probably Watertown, WIRegistered User regular
    edited September 2013
    Katai Ki wrote: »
    I can't help but think that a huge part of defines the way people act in this world is based on miscommunication and a belief that "If it rhymes, it must be true!"

    Really, can we all just sit down and talk it out?

    Well, the same goes in the political world a lot of the time in real life. How many big, complex issues deserving of deep, involved discussion end up, in practice, getting boiled down to a catchy little slogan, often rhyming, that can get repeatedly shouted into a camera? (Just off the top of my head: "Flip-flop!" "Bush lied, people died!" "Hey-hey, ho-ho, X has got to go!") It's just that here the slogans are four lines instead of four words, and they sound a lot deeper and wiser because they're in poetry form, even if they're not wise at all.

    Imagine if half the shit said on cable-news programs right now were said in the form of four-line poems, without changing the sentiment of the statements.

    Gosling on
    I have a new soccer blog The Minnow Tank. Reading it psychically kicks Sepp Blatter in the bean bag.
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    ossuaryossuary Canada, eh!Registered User regular
    What I am interested to know is whether or not the scoutmaster from the Lookouts comics is now technically an oathbreaker. He stepped in against the rules of the Lookouts and the village to save the children... doesn't this make him a prime candidate to become part of the Thornwatch? He seems to have chosen those in need over what the laws dictate.

    I'm very excited to see how these kinds of interactions continue to develop. I need more of this world. It needs to exist, in all possible forms, ASAP. :)

    --ossuary
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    SiduriSiduri Oakland, CARegistered User new member
    I am incredibly invested in this storyline because I am the fan who originally suggested the "Daughters of the Eyrewood" name! Like the rest of you, I am in LOVE with "The Tithe," it gave me chills, and I want as much of this world as I can get.

    I wrote a little piece of fanfic (a children's rhyme actually, like the others we've seen about the Daughters) and sent it to Mike and Jerry. Mike was kind enough to reply with a "totally awesome" so I thought I'd share it here.


    Fires in the forest
    one, two, three
    Fires in the forest
    one, two, three

    Daughter leads the dancing
    four, five, six
    Daughter leads the dancing
    four, five, six

    Mother calls the steps
    seven, eight, nine,
    Mother calls the steps
    seven, eight, nine

    Bones in the ashes, midnight's wife
    Count to ten and run for your life


    (In the reference to "midnight's wife" I was kind of trying to suggest the existence of a Crone, since we've seen maidens and Mothers. I'm pretty thrilled to see Mike basically confirm that in his comment above.)

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    edenskyedensky Registered User new member
    First off, Gabe & Tycho. I love the worldbuilding you have done and can't wait for more of it, captures the imagination like few others have.

    Second, I think we all might have missed a specific plot point dealing with what the Thornwatch can do. Hanna tied the Crow's Loop, which according to the ritual, is for Travelers far from home. The Warrior explains it plainly, "You are a Daughter of the Eyrewood in the Heart of the Forest, You are home". Hanna ran away from the older daughter after she saw her own blooms, and invoked the "forbidden" ritual trying to get home as fast as she could. The Thornwatch are not going to mess with a called, becoming daughter, that's not their purview. Hanna will have to deal with her calling.

    Hanna is also young, and saw her calling as an advetnure, but as we all do when we are young, did not think it through all the way. She seems quite happy to be running away at the beginning, doing so without much hesitation, singing a light hearted travelling song, but then things got real.

    I do feel like The Blade does not have a high opinion of the Daughters (it could be that he lost his daughter to the Eyrewood, or just hates the idea of children being taken from their families, or that he just hates the organization as a whole), and that he is telling Hanna to commit suicide, but that he is fulfilling his duty (maliciously) by doing so. He knows she cannot fight her calling, and he is telling her the only way to get out. Harsh, but possibly true.

    So glad so many other people love this storyline. Can't wait for Monday.

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    RatherDashing89RatherDashing89 Registered User regular
    ossuary wrote: »
    What I am interested to know is whether or not the scoutmaster from the Lookouts comics is now technically an oathbreaker. He stepped in against the rules of the Lookouts and the village to save the children... doesn't this make him a prime candidate to become part of the Thornwatch? He seems to have chosen those in need over what the laws dictate.

    I had actually assumed that that comic was a subtle way of showing us where the Thornwatch came from--if not their specific members, certainly their ideals. I think you're right on the money.

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    DedwrekkaDedwrekka Metal Hell adjacentRegistered User regular
    Katai Ki wrote: »
    I can't help but think that a huge part of defines the way people act in this world is based on miscommunication and a belief that "If it rhymes, it must be true!"

    Really, can we all just sit down and talk it out?
    That's probably misconstruing the facts in favor of seeing them as the noble savage. It's like looking at the GMO movement and concluding that they worship natural corn (trying to avoid any of the real times that view has been taken as they're kind of sad and racist).

    The rhymes probably exist to teach lessons much the same way that old fairy stories did. You teach lessons through stories, songs, and rhymes because they frankly work better that way.
    It's not so much about believing what rhymes as it is the rhymes existing to teach what is.

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    CambiataCambiata Commander Shepard The likes of which even GAWD has never seenRegistered User regular
    Siduri wrote: »
    I am incredibly invested in this storyline because I am the fan who originally suggested the "Daughters of the Eyrewood" name! Like the rest of you, I am in LOVE with "The Tithe," it gave me chills, and I want as much of this world as I can get.

    I wrote a little piece of fanfic (a children's rhyme actually, like the others we've seen about the Daughters) and sent it to Mike and Jerry. Mike was kind enough to reply with a "totally awesome" so I thought I'd share it here.


    Fires in the forest
    one, two, three
    Fires in the forest
    one, two, three

    Daughter leads the dancing
    four, five, six
    Daughter leads the dancing
    four, five, six

    Mother calls the steps
    seven, eight, nine,
    Mother calls the steps
    seven, eight, nine

    Bones in the ashes, midnight's wife
    Count to ten and run for your life


    (In the reference to "midnight's wife" I was kind of trying to suggest the existence of a Crone, since we've seen maidens and Mothers. I'm pretty thrilled to see Mike basically confirm that in his comment above.)

    This is awesome, but one thing I would change is to remove the repetition. It comes off more ominous that way, IMO:

    Fires in the forest
    one, two, three
    Daughter leads the dancing
    four, five, six
    Mother calls the steps
    seven, eight, nine,

    Bones in the ashes, midnight's wife
    Count to ten and run for your life

    Either way, great writing skills you have there. :)

    Peace to fashion police, I wear my heart
    On my sleeve, let the runway start
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    BuzzwordsBuzzwords Registered User regular
    480254_340420312737713_1403565185_n.jpg


    more goin' on here than at first glance...

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    ZachfiveZachfive Registered User new member
    I love this change in tone from the "heroes."

    Agreed, I also get the feeling he is telling her basically "You don't like it? Tough. Take a long walk off a short pier if you can't deal."

    As for the "witch" slur... I feel like his anger is probably much more personal, or the others may have been less accommodating to her despair as well. One thing about the Daughters is that for each one called, a number of people lose a loved one/friend. (One meaning I see in the phrase "killed her father") So it is entirely possible that he lost a daughter/sister/close friend at some point from the Calling, and has a personal resentment of the cost that the daughters bring to the people they've left.

    He may have even encountered her during his current "occupation" ...and it may not have been everything he'd hoped for.

    +++ End of Line +++

    "You know what they say about love and war...?"
    "Yeah, one involves a lot of physical and psychological pain, and the other one's war."
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    Adam CasalinoAdam Casalino New York (in my heart)Registered User regular
    edited September 2013
    Siduri wrote: »
    I wrote a little piece of fanfic (a children's rhyme actually, like the others we've seen about the Daughters) and sent it to Mike and Jerry. Mike was kind enough to reply with a "totally awesome" so I thought I'd share it here.


    Fires in the forest
    one, two, three
    Fires in the forest
    one, two, three

    Daughter leads the dancing
    four, five, six
    Daughter leads the dancing
    four, five, six

    Mother calls the steps
    seven, eight, nine,
    Mother calls the steps
    seven, eight, nine

    Bones in the ashes, midnight's wife
    Count to ten and run for your life

    Really cool. As I read it I could hear drum beats going along with the rhythm of each line.


    Edit: Oh The Greenheart! He's my favorite.

    Adam Casalino on
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    PedroAsaniPedroAsani Brotherhood of the Squirrel [Prime]Registered User regular
    Gabriel wrote: »
    I love you guys. I can't tell you how happy it makes me to read this discussion. If you want my opinion, PedroAsani nailed it pretty well:

    "Lookouts: protect the village from the things in the forest.
    Daughters: protect the forest from everything. Sometimes that means the people in the village.
    Thornwatch: protect the vulnerable from the village and the forest.

    So sometimes their goals align, sometimes they are opposed."

    You can have many different interactions with a Daughter. They could be positive and they could be very negative. The Warrior is saying "we can't help you" he's not making a judgment call or offering advice. He was called to solve a problem. There is no problem he can solve. end of story.

    The Greenheart is a sort of druid. he has a (compared to a Daughter of the Eyrewood) limited connection to the forest. To him what she is about to go through is probably beautiful. In a way he might even be jealous of the power she's coming into? He knows he cannot "solve" her problem in the way she wants but he (in a condescending way?) is at least trying to comfort her.

    The Blade has probably had bad experiences with Daughters, Mothers or maybe even crones in the past. Imagine if the only Jedi you ever met was Darth Vader. In his opinion she is a witch and he knows better than to interfere but he can't help but offer up his own "advice".

    I love this world so much and I hope that passion comes through in the artwork. Seeing how into it you all are is a real inspiration so thank you.

    See, this is why Jerry needs to write the books, or at least a pretty fucking extensive Wikipedia on the Eyrewood. Mentally stepping into the Eyrewood is simple. And the names of some of the things just fit perfectly. Greenheart says a deep connection with nature. Thornwatch evokes the sharp, hard, painful task of defending something fragile.

    I'm waiting to see what the game looks like once the mechanics are finalised and the archetypes have had their names Jerry-fied. What about the creatures that inhabit the forest? I already made suggestions to Mike in the Pin FAQ that I hope get taken up.

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