Anxiety on dental fillings

KleinKlein Registered User regular
I went to get my teeth cleaned and a new dentist says they found decay on one of my wisdom teeth and what looks like decay on two of my molars. I should note, the hygienist who cleaned my teeth saw nothing on the molars during the cleaning. With my adult teeth, I have never had a cavity, but I am not surprised about the wisdom tooth because it is hard to reach. One concern is if my dentist is being too proactive with the molars, I would rather not have any fillings but understand they may be necessary. I could attribute this to me having no history with this dentist. I am not asking the forums for medical advice or alternative treatment options, but I would like to hear people's experience with getting dental fillings and if I should ask the dentist what are other alternatives.

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  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    If you want a second opinion you could see another dentist.

    DarkewolfeNightDragontastydonutsFiendishrabbitchrishallett83
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    edited February 7
    Your hygienist is not there to find fillings, they are there to clean your teeth. Presumably your dentist took x-rays and was looking at those, because much of the time you aren't going to see anything just by looking. You can ask to have your x rays explained to you by the dentist, and if you don't trust the dentist you saw you could ask for a second opinion from a different one. Being careful with your teeth doesn't mean you'll never have a cavity though. You can always ask about alternatives, but in my experience "remove decay --> fill hole" is pretty much how it works. You can ask about sealants, but I think those are usually meant for areas where decay is likely more than areas where decay has already occurred.

    The process isn't fun, but it doesn't take too long either. They'll numb the nerve, remove any decay they can find, make much smaller hole than it feels like they're making, and then fill it. Then you just go about the rest of your day with your face half numb till the local fades.

    ceres on
    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    CelestialBadgerNightslyrNightDragonBahamutZEROdispatch.oCalicaBurnagezepherinHappylilElftynicschussAngelHedgieElvenshaechrishallett83Stabbity StyleAim
  • KleinKlein Registered User regular
    ceres wrote: »
    Your hygienist is not there to find fillings, they are there to clean your teeth. Presumably your dentist took x-rays and was looking at those, because much of the time you aren't going to see anything just by looking. You can ask to have your x rays explained to you by the dentist, and if you don't trust the dentist you saw you could ask for a second opinion from a different one. Being careful with your teeth doesn't mean you'll never have a cavity though. You can always ask about alternatives, but in my experience "remove decay --> fill hole" is pretty much how it works. You can ask about sealants, but I think those are usually meant for areas where decay is likely more than areas where decay has already occurred.

    The process isn't fun, but it doesn't take too long either. They'll numb the nerve, remove any decay they can find, make much smaller hole than it feels like they're making, and then fill it. Then you just go about the rest of your day with your face half numb till the local fades.

    Thanks for the input, I appreciate it! On the wisdom tooth, they could see the decay using a camera, but the other two were not. I think I will see if I can stop by the dentist before my appointment and have them walk me through their thoughts and the process.

    Regarding the fillings, I am reading about amalgam and composite fillings, any experience with those? I am worried that they will either be noticeable, weak or easily damaged, or can come loose.

  • NightslyrNightslyr Registered User regular
    I don't know what kind of fillings I have, but I got them (two) when I was in 5th grade. I still have them, and I'm going to turn 40 next Saturday. While fillings may fail at some point, I don't think they're really anything to be concerned about from a longevity standpoint. Barring any kind of more pronounced tooth decay issue, they should be fine for years if not decades.

    Regarding the actual procedure, it's really not a big deal. The worst part is keeping your mouth open. For the rest, well, they numb you up for it. They may prescribe pain meds for when the anesthesia wears off, but I don't remember it being bad enough to take anything more potent than ibuprofen for. That said, I have a lot of experience with pain management from other, more involved medical procedures, so YMMV.

    PSN/XBL/Nintendo/Origin/Steam: Nightslyr 3DS: 1607-1682-2948
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    CelestialBadger
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    AFAIK pretty much all fillings are composite fillings these days, amalgam is nearly phased out. Amalgam are the ones that look like metal, composite fillings will look like your teeth.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    NightDragonCelestialBadgerLaOsFiendishrabbitElvenshaeAim
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Yeah, modern-day dental fillings blend in pretty seamlessly with your natural tooth color.

    zepherinLaOs
  • BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User regular
    Huh, I think my dentist mentioned to me a couple years ago when I was getting a bunch of long-deferred fillings and crowns done that the white composite material is falling out of favor, at least with him, because it's starting to show durability problems compared to amalgam. I'm not certain I'm remembering this conversation correctly but that's the gist of what my memory tells me.

    BahamutZERO.gif
  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    Composite is durable enough. I've had some for about 15 years now. It is better because it looks nicer - like natural teeth. Worth it if I have to have them replaced eventually.

  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    My understanding is that composite ultimately won the filling wars, I hear it's getting hard to find somewhere that stocks amalgam anymore. I'm not a dentist, I just have more fillings than a person should and I'm chatty at doctors' offices.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    NightDragon
  • CalicaCalica Registered User regular
    I have a whole buncha fillings in my molars on account of inheriting weak enamel from somewhere on my dad's side. Most of them are amalgam because my answer to "what kind do you want" has always been "whatever's more durable," and they're old enough that amalgam was the better option at the time. (So it totally looks like I have a mouthful of buckshot; but since molars aren't really visible in, like, casual conversation, I don't care how it looks.) I also have problems with my jaw joint (TMJ) that make it very difficult and uncomfortable to hold my mouth open for long stretches.

    In my opinion, the worst part, bar none, is the numbing shot itself - but it doesn't take long at all. Once that's over, the rest is annoying but tolerable. For my jaw, the dentist provides a bite block - basically a firm rubbery wedge that holds my mouth open so I don't have to do it myself. It can be removed at a moment's notice.

    You'll feel some vibration from the drilling. You shouldn't feel any pain if you're numbed properly, though, so let your dentist know if it hurts. Also, concentrate on keeping your tongue out of the way - if the drill nicks it, you won't feel it at the time; but it'll sting like a bitch later :razz: Some people are bothered by the high-pitched noise the drill makes. For what it's worth, I have never been one of them, and I happen to know my hearing at high frequencies is better than average.

    I have been known to take a small stuffed animal with me to squeeze. No one batted an eye.

    Jedoc wrote: »
    The GOP cares about babies until they're born, soldiers until they're in need of care, and families until they interfere with stockholder dividends.
    ceresLostNinjaNightDragon
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited February 7
    Klein wrote: »
    I would like to hear people's experience with getting dental fillings and if I should ask the dentist what are other alternatives.

    ive had dozens of fillings, and if you held a gun to my head I couldn't tell you what teeth they are on or where on any given tooth they are at.. that's how not noticeable they are when you have them

    if the cavities are mild and the dentist is skilled, you'll eventually not even know anything was done.

    in terms of the procedure itself, again, mild cavities.. skilled dentist... sometimes its done before you realize it started

    Jasconius on
    zepherinLostNinjaschussNightDragon
  • dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    The thing I noticed after getting my filling is that temperature sensitivity is now a thing. I have to brush my teeth after anything excessively sweet, too.

    There are no alternative treatments. Teeth don't self-repair.

    My insurance covers composite fillings for visible teeth and amalgam for what are considered non-cosmetic teeth. You can pay the difference of course but there's no reason to.

  • BurnageBurnage irregular Registered User regular
    ceres wrote: »
    My understanding is that composite ultimately won the filling wars, I hear it's getting hard to find somewhere that stocks amalgam anymore. I'm not a dentist, I just have more fillings than a person should and I'm chatty at doctors' offices.

    I think this might depend on location, I got my first filling recently in the UK and was offered the choice between composite and amalgam. I went for amalgam because it was explained to me as being cheaper and more durable, just less aesthetically pleasing (which I didn't care about due to the location of the cavity).

    Though my dentist also gave me the filling without anaesthetic, so maybe my experience was somewhat non-standard.

  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    My insurance covered it pretty well, so my new dentist replaced my old amalgams with new composites. I like the look a lot better. And I've had an amalgam come out before.

    Fillings aren't so bad, they numb you up there's a lot of noise and vibration in your mouth, and then it tastes funny for an hour, and you mouth is numbed up for about 2 or 3. It's just kind of an annoying few hours.

    If you don't get them, and decay gets deep enough, you could have some serious problems, that could require extraction or a root canal.

    CelestialBadger
  • CalicaCalica Registered User regular
    Burnage wrote: »
    ceres wrote: »
    My understanding is that composite ultimately won the filling wars, I hear it's getting hard to find somewhere that stocks amalgam anymore. I'm not a dentist, I just have more fillings than a person should and I'm chatty at doctors' offices.

    I think this might depend on location, I got my first filling recently in the UK and was offered the choice between composite and amalgam. I went for amalgam because it was explained to me as being cheaper and more durable, just less aesthetically pleasing (which I didn't care about due to the location of the cavity).

    Though my dentist also gave me the filling without anaesthetic, so maybe my experience was somewhat non-standard.

    :bigfrown:

    Jedoc wrote: »
    The GOP cares about babies until they're born, soldiers until they're in need of care, and families until they interfere with stockholder dividends.
    JaysonFourceresOrca
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    Burnage wrote: »
    ceres wrote: »
    My understanding is that composite ultimately won the filling wars, I hear it's getting hard to find somewhere that stocks amalgam anymore. I'm not a dentist, I just have more fillings than a person should and I'm chatty at doctors' offices.

    I think this might depend on location, I got my first filling recently in the UK and was offered the choice between composite and amalgam. I went for amalgam because it was explained to me as being cheaper and more durable, just less aesthetically pleasing (which I didn't care about due to the location of the cavity).

    Though my dentist also gave me the filling without anaesthetic, so maybe my experience was somewhat non-standard.

    Is this a UK thing? An ex of mine when I was younger lived there, and he had the same thing, and just.. D:

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    dispatch.ozepherin
  • dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    edited February 8
    Eh, I had a couple done when I was very young without anesthetic. Some sort of non-logic about children not having sensation in baby teeth or something.

    It was nonsense, it hurt exactly as much as you think it would.

    I read a few years ago that the dentist who did it to me died of stomach cancer after a very prolonged illness, and it brought me a smile for the day. I hope he suffered immeasurably.

    Edit:

    It hurt so much that the next time I had a bit of dental pain that might have been a cavity, I pulled the tooth with a pair of pliers and a handful of napkins rather than go see him again. Which also hurts a lot, and bleeds a lot, and sounds like someone tearing a piece of cardboard in half but inside your head. I still can't say it was worse than the drill.

    Edit2: added spoiler -

    Also, if it's an anxiety issue, call ahead and tell the dental office you can't sit still without something for the anxiety, they will offer nitrous oxide and it's worth it. It's a disassociative with a very short half-life that will make it feel like you're watching a movie about someone else. You can also call your primary care physician and tell them that you have a dentist appointment and you'd like a single dose of ativan or vallium... take it as prescribed and it'll really be no big deal.

    Edit3: I take a sudafed so that I can breath through my nose easier, it might be helpful for you.

    dispatch.o on
    ceresNightDragon
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    dispatch.o wrote: »
    Eh, I had a couple done when I was very young without anesthetic. Some sort of non-logic about children not having sensation in baby teeth or something.

    It was nonsense, it hurt exactly as much as you think it would.

    I read a few years ago that the dentist who did it to me died of stomach cancer after a very prolonged illness, and it brought me a smile for the day. I hope he suffered immeasurably.

    Edit:

    It hurt so much that the next time I had a bit of dental pain that might have been a cavity, I pulled the tooth with a pair of pliers and a handful of napkins rather than go see him again. Which also hurts a lot, and bleeds a lot, and sounds like someone tearing a piece of cardboard in half but inside your head. I still can't say it was worse than the drill.

    O.O

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    JaysonFourCalicaBurnageMrVyngaardschussNightDragonStabbity Style
  • Ark EvensongArk Evensong The NetherlandsRegistered User regular
    edited February 8
    ceres wrote: »
    Is this a UK thing? An ex of mine when I was younger lived there, and he had the same thing, and just.. D:
    /shrug

    From the Netherlands here, never had anaesthetic for fillings either.

    Ark Evensong on
  • KleinKlein Registered User regular
    Thank you all for your advice and perspectives, I think I will talk with this dentist beforehand just for peace of mind. Fingers crossed that everything goes well!

    XaquinBahamutZEROBurnagedispatch.oSteevL
  • BurnageBurnage irregular Registered User regular
    ceres wrote: »
    Burnage wrote: »
    ceres wrote: »
    My understanding is that composite ultimately won the filling wars, I hear it's getting hard to find somewhere that stocks amalgam anymore. I'm not a dentist, I just have more fillings than a person should and I'm chatty at doctors' offices.

    I think this might depend on location, I got my first filling recently in the UK and was offered the choice between composite and amalgam. I went for amalgam because it was explained to me as being cheaper and more durable, just less aesthetically pleasing (which I didn't care about due to the location of the cavity).

    Though my dentist also gave me the filling without anaesthetic, so maybe my experience was somewhat non-standard.

    Is this a UK thing? An ex of mine when I was younger lived there, and he had the same thing, and just.. D:

    I don't think so, most of my friends here were shocked that I hadn't had any. I'm pretty sure it was just a combination of a very minor cavity and a slightly sadistic dentist.

  • SteevLSteevL What can I do for you? Registered User regular
    I actually had a cavity filled a few years ago without anesthetic and I was in central Illinois. The doctor basically gave me the choice and said that it wasn't a deep cavity, so anesthetic would probably be overkill. Wasn't too bad and I was out of there in 15 minutes. And I was prepared for it because my wife had the same thing done at that dentist a few months earlier and she said it was fine. I definitely wouldn't recommend that for most people, though.

    OP, if your dentist offers you such a choice and you've never had a filling before (or haven't for a long time), take the anesthetic!

    JaysonFourzepherinLaOsCelestialBadgerMrVyngaardNightDragon
  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    My nerve clusters are apparently not where they're supposed to be in my mouth and for some reason my body shoves novocaine entirely out of my mouth and into my face in like 20-30 minutes.

    Long story short I had 2 crowns put on when I was 11 years old with no anesthesia. The result being I didn't go back to a dentist until I was in my 20s because it turns out when you walk out of the dentist office soaked from head to toe in sweat and literally shaking from pain you kinda don't want to go back.

    Take the anesthesia and if it's wearing off don't be afraid to tell the dentist.

    And if they try and tell you that it's fine please murder them with the spiked ball that's spinning at a few hundred rpm that they've been using to literally grind your teeth to dust.

    dispatch.o
  • dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    Depending on whether it's upper or lower there will be a numbness that's very localized to the tooth or half your face. That's normal.

    Bring some headphones, put on some Pink Floyd and enjoy the weird of nitrous and Valium.

  • BeefjerkyBeefjerky Registered User regular
    I had a couple fillings done recently and learned that the metal looking fillings after about 15-20 year range will corrode and start expanding causing your teeth to fracture and ultimately lead to many unfun things. They showed me the photos of my larger filling and could visibly see the fractures starting on all 4 corners of the filling. It was the first one I had replaced, and also my first ever pain free dental appointment. I have a number of nightmare stories myself and have intense anxiety going to the dentist myself. Any good dentist will take any question you have seriously as they should being essentially a medical professional.

    HappylilElf
  • MegaMan001MegaMan001 CRNA Rochester, MNRegistered User regular
    When I care for patients who are deeply anxious prior to a same day procedure, like dental fillings, I'll often use an oral anti-anxiety medication for them to take on the way to the office. Typically something like Valium just to take the edge off.

    You'll need a ride to and from the office if that's something you think would help.

    I also have like...six or so amalgam fillings from when I was a pre-teen and I'm 34 now and they haven't moved - they are all amalgam. One tooth in particular I remember the dentist telling me is actually more filling than tooth enamel.

    I am in the business of saving lives.
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    My nerve clusters are apparently not where they're supposed to be in my mouth and for some reason my body shoves novocaine entirely out of my mouth and into my face in like 20-30 minutes.

    Long story short I had 2 crowns put on when I was 11 years old with no anesthesia. The result being I didn't go back to a dentist until I was in my 20s because it turns out when you walk out of the dentist office soaked from head to toe in sweat and literally shaking from pain you kinda don't want to go back.

    Take the anesthesia and if it's wearing off don't be afraid to tell the dentist.

    And if they try and tell you that it's fine please murder them with the spiked ball that's spinning at a few hundred rpm that they've been using to literally grind your teeth to dust.

    As a mod I am supposed to point out that you aren't allowed to suggest or condone violence on the forums... just... having trouble with this one.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    zepherinJaysonFourHappylilElfSkeithCalicaBahamutZERO
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    That’s so weird. I have fillings done without Novocain, but I have to wave off the dentist. He’s like, “you sure? I don’t want you to be in discomfort.”

    Now I also go in whiskeyed up but there are likely reasons that’s not a great idea, but I like whiskey and hate Novocain.

  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    If you just have very minor surface cavities which are nowhere near the root, then often dentists will tackle them without anaesthetic because the needle can be more painful than the drilling.
    But if they're anywhere near a nerve then you definitely want to be numbed up, and some people find just the vibration from the drill to be discomforting. So if they ask and you're at all anxious, go with the local injection(s). (they'll probably just do it regardless as a matter of routine).

    zepherinSkeithNightDragon
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    dont let a dentist cheap out on you on novocain

    here's how it works... they largely get paid the same amount of money by insurance no matter how much they use.. so the less they use, the more cream for them

    if you want it, get it, and if they don't give it to you, find a better dentist

    schussJaysonFourNightDragonNightslyr
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    Jasconius wrote: »
    dont let a dentist cheap out on you on novocain

    here's how it works... they largely get paid the same amount of money by insurance no matter how much they use.. so the less they use, the more cream for them

    if you want it, get it, and if they don't give it to you, find a better dentist

    Yep,and if it still hurts a lot, tell them. Only one dentist I've seen has reliably nailed the nerves first try.
    Also - relaxants are a thing, but for minor fillings likely overkill (really not that bad). I don't want to think about how many fillings I have....

  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    schuss wrote: »
    Jasconius wrote: »
    dont let a dentist cheap out on you on novocain

    here's how it works... they largely get paid the same amount of money by insurance no matter how much they use.. so the less they use, the more cream for them

    if you want it, get it, and if they don't give it to you, find a better dentist

    Yep,and if it still hurts a lot, tell them. Only one dentist I've seen has reliably nailed the nerves first try.
    Also - relaxants are a thing, but for minor fillings likely overkill (really not that bad). I don't want to think about how many fillings I have....

    I'm pretty sure my teeth are approaching close to 50% fillings/crowns at this point. And I'm literally going in tomorrow to have a filling fixed which may end up requiring another crown.

    Turns out ignoring the dentist for 10ish years when you have crap teeth to begin with is not a great idea and you literally pay for doing so for years. The first time I went back the report was "You need 17 fillings, 2 crowns and a root canal" meaning I had to spread the work across three years because my dental plan would have laughed at doing all of that in a year.

  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    My issue is that my childhood dentist was dodgy, then we were poor for a while and I have soft teeth.
    Going in a few weeks to get 2 fillings and replace 2 cracked crowns in one go.

  • NightslyrNightslyr Registered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    If you just have very minor surface cavities which are nowhere near the root, then often dentists will tackle them without anaesthetic because the needle can be more painful than the drilling.

    Eh?

    Now, granted I was in middle school when I got my two fillings, but I distinctly remember the dentist putting gloop on my gums before using the needle, which made me barely feel the needle at all. Is that not/no longer a thing?

    PSN/XBL/Nintendo/Origin/Steam: Nightslyr 3DS: 1607-1682-2948
    Switch: SW-3515-0057-3813 FF XIV: Q'vehn Tia
  • CalicaCalica Registered User regular
    Nightslyr wrote: »
    tynic wrote: »
    If you just have very minor surface cavities which are nowhere near the root, then often dentists will tackle them without anaesthetic because the needle can be more painful than the drilling.

    Eh?

    Now, granted I was in middle school when I got my two fillings, but I distinctly remember the dentist putting gloop on my gums before using the needle, which made me barely feel the needle at all. Is that not/no longer a thing?

    It is, but it only numbs the surface. Apparently the pain is actually from the novocaine entering the tissue, or so Google tells me.

    Jedoc wrote: »
    The GOP cares about babies until they're born, soldiers until they're in need of care, and families until they interfere with stockholder dividends.
  • MegaMan001MegaMan001 CRNA Rochester, MNRegistered User regular
    Calica wrote: »
    Nightslyr wrote: »
    tynic wrote: »
    If you just have very minor surface cavities which are nowhere near the root, then often dentists will tackle them without anaesthetic because the needle can be more painful than the drilling.

    Eh?

    Now, granted I was in middle school when I got my two fillings, but I distinctly remember the dentist putting gloop on my gums before using the needle, which made me barely feel the needle at all. Is that not/no longer a thing?

    It is, but it only numbs the surface. Apparently the pain is actually from the novocaine entering the tissue, or so Google tells me.

    There's a difference between topical and local anesthetics. Well, mostly its a nomenclature thing.

    Gels or sprays are topical anesthetic preparations that numb the superficial tissue. Injections are local anesthetic preparations that will numb deeper nerve structures.

    Same drug, different routes.

    I am in the business of saving lives.
    dispatch.ozepherin
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    If you just have very minor surface cavities which are nowhere near the root, then often dentists will tackle them without anaesthetic because the needle can be more painful than the drilling.
    But if they're anywhere near a nerve then you definitely want to be numbed up, and some people find just the vibration from the drill to be discomforting. So if they ask and you're at all anxious, go with the local injection(s). (they'll probably just do it regardless as a matter of routine).

    Yep I got two fillings last year that weren't anywhere near a nerve so the dentist just drilled and filled. Honestly the cleaning beforehand hurt more, with all the picking and scraping.

  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    It occurs to me now that this thread about dental anxiety probably isn't very calming.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    zepherindispatch.oJaysonFourSkeithschussStabbity Style
  • CalicaCalica Registered User regular
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    Calica wrote: »
    Nightslyr wrote: »
    tynic wrote: »
    If you just have very minor surface cavities which are nowhere near the root, then often dentists will tackle them without anaesthetic because the needle can be more painful than the drilling.

    Eh?

    Now, granted I was in middle school when I got my two fillings, but I distinctly remember the dentist putting gloop on my gums before using the needle, which made me barely feel the needle at all. Is that not/no longer a thing?

    It is, but it only numbs the surface. Apparently the pain is actually from the novocaine entering the tissue, or so Google tells me.

    There's a difference between topical and local anesthetics. Well, mostly its a nomenclature thing.

    Gels or sprays are topical anesthetic preparations that numb the superficial tissue. Injections are local anesthetic preparations that will numb deeper nerve structures.

    Same drug, different routes.

    Yes. The question, as I understand it, was about the topical anesthetic they apply so the local anesthetic shot won't hurt (as much).

    Jedoc wrote: »
    The GOP cares about babies until they're born, soldiers until they're in need of care, and families until they interfere with stockholder dividends.
    Nightslyr
  • NightslyrNightslyr Registered User regular
    Calica wrote: »
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    Calica wrote: »
    Nightslyr wrote: »
    tynic wrote: »
    If you just have very minor surface cavities which are nowhere near the root, then often dentists will tackle them without anaesthetic because the needle can be more painful than the drilling.

    Eh?

    Now, granted I was in middle school when I got my two fillings, but I distinctly remember the dentist putting gloop on my gums before using the needle, which made me barely feel the needle at all. Is that not/no longer a thing?

    It is, but it only numbs the surface. Apparently the pain is actually from the novocaine entering the tissue, or so Google tells me.

    There's a difference between topical and local anesthetics. Well, mostly its a nomenclature thing.

    Gels or sprays are topical anesthetic preparations that numb the superficial tissue. Injections are local anesthetic preparations that will numb deeper nerve structures.

    Same drug, different routes.

    Yes. The question, as I understand it, was about the topical anesthetic they apply so the local anesthetic shot won't hurt (as much).

    This. My dentist put the topical gloop on first, waited a few minutes, then injected me with the local anesthetic. Didn't feel much of anything for either filling. Keeping my mouth open and having cotton wedged into my cheek was more uncomfortable than the actual filling process.

    PSN/XBL/Nintendo/Origin/Steam: Nightslyr 3DS: 1607-1682-2948
    Switch: SW-3515-0057-3813 FF XIV: Q'vehn Tia
    zepherinschuss
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