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Penny Arcade - Comic - Blood Price

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Blood Price!

Penny Arcade - Comic - Blood Price

Videogaming-related online strip by Mike Krahulik and Jerry Holkins. Includes news and commentary.

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    TyintheronTyintheron Registered User new member
    I looked up their announcement video about Ghostwriter, and by far my favourite thing about it was the expression on Horrified Bearded Dude's face, center screen at the 1:03 mark.

    That's the expression of a man who has just opened a prank email from a colleague titled "URGENT: NEED FEEDBACK" that contains a GIF of something disgusting. You can really SEE him saying "OHHHHEEEEWWWW!" and regretting his decisions. Why did he click on that email? What is WRONG with the dude that sent it?

    We've all been Horrified Bearded Dude at some point.

    It's great.

    I hope he's okay, though.

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    hiraethhiraeth SpaceRegistered User regular
    These ones are always my favourite comics.

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    LttlefootLttlefoot Registered User regular
    Do you think we are going to see an influx of indie games using AI generated code and assets?

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    edited March 2023
    Lttlefoot wrote: »
    Do you think we are going to see an influx of indie games using AI generated code and assets?

    For sure. It's something that will put a certain type of game within reach of people who it wouldn't otherwise be.

    dennis on
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    thorkosthorkos Registered User regular
    Penny Arcade Podcast, Ep. 25 - The Spore Cult, February 15, 2008:

    @~4:40

    Mike: ...how far away can procedurally generated writing be?
    Jerry: Procedurally generated writing would be an improvement in most games.

    I know it was a joke, but...just saying.

    NOLITEACTVMIRI
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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    edited March 2023
    I think most of the time, writing for videogame is to an actual writer what testing videogames is to an actual gamer. Not nearly as rad as you might imagine. Mostly mundane and tedious, and does nothing to advance your craft. I don't think have them computer generated, with humans to look them over afterwards is a terrible thing.

    There have been very, very few games that I would ever say had great writing. I'm sure there were but I can't think of them off the top of my head. And not even that many that I would say have good writing. The peak for most games is competent.

    dennis on
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    Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Lttlefoot wrote: »
    Do you think we are going to see an influx of indie games using AI generated code and assets?

    Given that one of the benefits of the Unreal (and I believe Unity) engines is the ability to purchase use rights of assets created by others (there's an entire section on the Epic Launcher for it that predates the Epic Game Store), it's likely inevitable whether to create something not on offer or to try and bypass that process entirely.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
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    v2miccav2micca Registered User regular
    edited March 2023
    So, going to go against the grain a little here and state my belief that the introduction of AI to game dialog could and should be an incredible development. Right now, in RPG games we get the classic wheel tree of Dialog. We select one of 3, maybe 4 canned responses. Maybe they effect the NPC response, maybe they don't. When they do, you get various canned dialog replies.

    Now, imagine a game where instead you are allowed to write any kind of dialog (more likely any reply that doesn't violate the terms of service agreement you signed when buying the game) and the game uses and AI bound to various predicate logic rules assigned to that specific NPC based on their personality traits and now instead you get a exponentially larger range of replies. This could legitimately improve gameplay via NPC interaction. You could build entire mini-games off of AI generated conversations, bargaining, outwitting, seduction. It opens entire worlds of possibilities.

    And yes, you still need traditional writers, for the world building, story-telling, character creation, ect. But you can leverage the power of AI to make interactions with those NPCs so much more meaningful.

    v2micca on
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    Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    v2micca wrote: »
    So, going to go against the grain a little here and state my belief that the introduction of AI to game dialog could and should be an incredible development. Right now, in RPG games we get the classic wheel tree of Dialog. We select one of 3, maybe 4 canned responses. Maybe they effect the NPC response, maybe they don't. When they do, you get various canned dialog replies.

    Now, imagine a game where instead you are allowed to write any kind of dialog (more likely any reply that doesn't violate the terms of service agreement you signed when buying the game) and the game uses and AI bound to various predicate logic rules assigned to that specific NPC based on their personality traits and now instead you get a exponentially larger range of replies. This could legitimately improve gameplay via NPC interaction. You could build entire mini-games off of AI generated conversations, bargaining, outwitting, seduction. It opens entire worlds of possibilities.

    And yes, you still need traditional writers, for the world building, story-telling, character creation, ect. But you can leverage the power of AI to make interactions with those NPCs so much more meaningful.

    Some people are already experimenting with this: https://arstechnica.com/gaming/2023/03/ai-voice-generation-helps-mod-fallout-4s-narrow-dialogue-choices/
    Roleplayer's Expanded Dialogue (RED) is listed in the NexusMods catalog as a "Massive expansion of vanilla dialogue," adding more than 300 entirely new lines of dialogue to the game. Those lines aim to solve an issue near to the hearts of fans of Fallout 1, 2, and New Vegas: role-playing. If you're playing as a ruthless jerk, a brilliant nuclear scientist, or a strong but dimwitted dolt, you'll see more dialogue options that reflect this. Mechanically, the roll-the-dice speech "checks," which are based solely on your charisma level in the default game, can now be unlocked using related traits or skills.

    They're not just new labels on existing dialogue, either. RED, created by NexusMods user ProfMajowski (and first seen by us at PCGamesN), says it used ElevenLabs voice AI to generate its more in-character lines. The results can sometimes "sound a little 'emotionless,'" the creator writes, but "otherwise they basically sound like the real thing." Nothing your character can newly say now will change the game's mechanics or reactions, but it should sound a bit more in character.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    edited March 2023
    Yeah, I think that's actually closer to what Jerry has expressed, @v2micca . I've experimented some with making ChatGPT tuned to processing one snippet of input dialogue and outputting just one snippet of response. I got it working really well. I've also found that it's REALLY good at figuring out the tone of a bit of writing (though not great on sarcasm). This would make it even more likely to hook up to a text-to-speech system that understands tone, like Play.ht.

    dennis on
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    YoungFreyYoungFrey Registered User regular
    I for one can't wait until every NPC sounds like they are BSing their way through an essay on dialectical empiricism.

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    YoungFrey wrote: »
    I for one can't wait until every NPC sounds like they are BSing their way through an essay on dialectical empiricism.

    From my very first attempt to do something like this with ChatGPT:
    Pretend to be an elderly goblin who has spent his life digging tunnels. I ask you if you have ever seen a gremlin. Gremlins have been known to appear in the mine and steal gold nuggets. They are very small, primitive animals that are hard to glimpse due to their speed. Respond to the following prompt in dialogue like a goblin of low intelligence: Have you ever seen a gremlin in these mines?

    Greetings, traveler! Me goblin, me dig tunnels long time. Gremlins, eh? Me heard of them, but me never seen one with me own eyes. They're sneaky little buggers, they are, always causing trouble for us hardworking goblins. Me heard they like to steal gold nuggets, but me never caught one in the act. Me reckon they're too quick for me old eyes to keep up with. Have you seen one of them gremlins around here?

    Pretend that this is my response and reply. "I have never seen one, but I have heard that your friend George has seen one. He said he saw one carrying a gold nugget. I have heard that he often has too much goblin ale. I am afraid he might be imagining it. Do you think George an be trusted?"

    Ah, George, that old drunkard! Me heard he's been seeing things lately, but me can't say for sure if he's telling the truth about seeing a gremlin with a gold nugget. Me reckon it's possible that he's imagining things, especially if he's been having too much goblin ale. Me wouldn't trust him too much, but it wouldn't hurt to ask him about what he saw. Maybe he did see something, or maybe he's just trying to impress the other goblins with his tall tales. It's hard to say for sure, but me always take what George says with a grain of salt.

    When I type dialog in quotes, pretend to respond as this goblin would. This goblin's name is Terry. "Is it hard working in the mines?"

    "Aye, it's hard work indeed! Digging tunnels all day long can be tough on the back and the arms, but us goblins are a hardy bunch. We don't mind a bit of hard work, as long as we get to keep our gold nuggets at the end of the day. Plus, we get to spend time with our fellow goblins and tell stories about our adventures. It's not a glamorous life, but it's an honest one. And it keeps us busy, so we don't have to think too much about the outside world."

    "Can you tell me a story about your most fantastic adventure?"

    "A story, eh? Me got plenty of those! Let me think for a moment... Ah, yes! Me once went on a grand adventure with me old friend, Drog. We heard that there was a secret cave filled with the most beautiful crystals you've ever seen. Me and Drog decided to go find it and claim the crystals for ourselves. We traveled through dark and dangerous tunnels, fighting off giant spiders and dodging falling rocks. It was a perilous journey, but we finally found the cave. And let me tell you, the crystals were even more beautiful than we had imagined! We filled our sacks with as many as we could carry and started to make our way back to our own tunnels. But just as we were leaving the cave, we heard a loud rumble. It was a giant troll, and he was blocking our way out! Me and Drog had to use all our wits and strength to defeat the troll and make it back to our tunnels safely. But we did it, and we had the most beautiful crystals to show for it. It was a grand adventure, one me will never forget!"

    What did you do with the crystals?

    "Well, me and Drog split the crystals between us, and we each kept some for ourselves. Me used some of me crystals to decorate me own tunnel, and me even traded a few of them with other goblins for some new tools and equipment. But most of them me kept as a reminder of our great adventure. Whenever me look at me crystals, me remember the dangers we faced and the treasures we won. It was a great accomplishment, and me and Drog were very proud of ourselves."

    How is Drog these days?

    "Ah, Drog... Me haven't seen him in a while, but me heard he's doing well. Last me heard, he had moved to a different part of the mine to dig for precious gems. He was always one for adventure, that Drog. Me reckon he's still out there, exploring new tunnels and finding new treasures. Me hope he's doing well, and me look forward to catching up with him someday."

    What's the best way to deal with a troll?

    "Trolls, eh? They can be tough customers, but us goblins have some tricks up our sleeves for dealing with them. The best way to deal with a troll is to outsmart it. Trolls are big and strong, but they're not always the brightest. Me and me fellow goblins like to set traps for them, like digging pits or hiding behind boulders and ambushing them. If that doesn't work, we use our sharp pickaxes to jab them in the soft spots, like the belly or the eyes. It's not pretty, but it gets the job done. And if all else fails, me and me friends will work together to distract the troll while someone sneaks behind it and lands a killing blow. It's dangerous work, but us goblins are a brave and resourceful bunch."

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    v2miccav2micca Registered User regular
    I mean, for a very quick and dirty ChatGPT setup, that's actually not bad dialog for an NPC goblin. Like I said, as the technology develops, you can use this kind of setup for dialog based mini-games, Like shop keepers that have predefined knowledge of various goods that you can now barter with, or NPCs that have access to specific knowledge, but will not reveal it unless you are able to successfully question them, or make romance options more immersive by making you actually woo the target of your affection.

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    edited March 2023
    v2micca wrote: »
    I mean, for a very quick and dirty ChatGPT setup, that's actually not bad dialog for an NPC goblin. Like I said, as the technology develops, you can use this kind of setup for dialog based mini-games, Like shop keepers that have predefined knowledge of various goods that you can now barter with, or NPCs that have access to specific knowledge, but will not reveal it unless you are able to successfully question them, or make romance options more immersive by making you actually woo the target of your affection.

    Yep. Like I said, that was my very first attempt to use ChatGPT. I was curious how it'd do as a sort of "dungeon master bot." I've gotten a lot better at fine tuning it since then. One of my main problems back then was it'd run away with the conversation and I'd have to tell it "No, we did NOT wrap up and say goodbye. I have more questions!" :lol:

    dennis on
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    v2miccav2micca Registered User regular
    dennis wrote: »
    Yep. Like I said, that was my very first attempt to use ChatGPT. I was curious how it'd do as a sort of "dungeon master bot." I've gotten a lot better at fine tuning it since then. One of my main problems back then was it'd run away with the conversation and I'd have to tell it "No, we did NOT wrap up and say goodbye. I have more questions!" :lol:


    Exactly, I could see competent developers building a hierarchical array of character objects to represent the NPCs, with each object containing trait, knowledge, relationship, and ability data for each NPC then letting the AI generate their reactions to the player character using those character objects. This could possibly extend beyond simple dialog interaction and truly make each NPC much more like interacting with a character.

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    MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    The "great" thing about all this is it will continue to re-enforce stereotypes and biases like certain fantasy classes sounding like offensive caricatures of real groups.

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    MichaelLC wrote: »
    The "great" thing about all this is it will continue to re-enforce stereotypes and biases like certain fantasy classes sounding like offensive caricatures of real groups.

    Yes, it's based on existing writing. But I'm pretty sure I could have very easily have gotten it to change to a different "sound" if I had one in mind. But it's really no different than existing writing. The people who are writing it - or really the people hiring them to write - have to make that change.

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    v2miccav2micca Registered User regular
    MichaelLC wrote: »
    The "great" thing about all this is it will continue to re-enforce stereotypes and biases like certain fantasy classes sounding like offensive caricatures of real groups.

    I mean, that is all on the developers. If the devs tell the AI to make their dwarves sound like drunken Scottish Highlanders, that is what the AI will attempt to do. So yeah, if the devs can't be bothered to actually write character motivations and background that the AI can use as parameters for generating dialog, it will default to prevalent archetypes. Which is why this will not replace writers, but actually make them more necessary.

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    edited March 2023
    I took a swing at getting it to tone it down.
    Pretend to be an elderly goblin who has spent his life digging tunnels. "Have you ever seen a gremlin.?" Gremlins have been known to appear in the mine and steal gold nuggets. They are very small, primitive animals that are hard to glimpse due to their speed. Respond in grammar and spelling as found in standard modern American English dictionaries.

    Well, hello there, young traveler! I am an old goblin who has spent his entire life digging tunnels. If you're curious about gremlins, I can tell you a thing or two. Have you ever seen a gremlin? They are quite the pesky creatures, let me tell you.

    Gremlins have been known to appear in the mine and steal gold nuggets. They are very small and primitive animals that are hard to glimpse due to their incredible speed. These little critters are quite the troublemakers and can cause a lot of mischief if you're not careful.

    I remember one time, a group of gremlins snuck into our mine and caused a huge commotion. They stole some of our most valuable gold nuggets and left us scrambling to recover our losses. It took us weeks to repair the damage they caused and get everything back to normal.

    So, if you ever come across a gremlin, be sure to keep your wits about you and watch your belongings closely. They may be small, but they can cause a lot of trouble if given the chance.

    It took a bit of fiddling to figure out how to get it to do what we mean by "avoid offensive caricatures of real groups."

    Of course, the more "neutral" I tried to make them sound (and really, that means trying to make them sound like a straight white male from the midwest, which carries its own bias of what's assumed to be "standard"), the more and more they all sounded alike. I feel like you'd get a roomful of people that sounded pretty interchangeable.

    I found this response interesting, when I gave it the previous criticism almost verbatim:
    Pretend to be an elderly goblin who has spent his life digging tunnels. Gremlins have been known to appear in the mine and steal gold nuggets. They are very small, primitive animals that are hard to glimpse due to their speed. Response to "Have you ever seen a gremlin.?" Avoid offensive caricatures of real groups.

    Ah, young adventurer, you ask about gremlins, do ya? I've spent my entire life digging tunnels in these mines, and I can tell ya that those little critters are real troublemakers. They may be small, but they're quick as lightning, and they've stolen many a nugget from me over the years.

    Now, I don't mean to offend anyone with what I'm about to say, but those gremlins are just like any other wild creature in these mines. They have their own habits and ways of surviving, and they don't mean to cause any harm to us goblins. They're just trying to get by like the rest of us.

    I can't say that I've seen a gremlin with my own two eyes, as they're quite elusive and quick. But I've certainly felt their presence and seen the evidence of their mischief. It's best to keep a sharp eye out for them when you're in the mines, as you never know when they might strike.

    dennis on
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    MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    dennis wrote: »
    MichaelLC wrote: »
    The "great" thing about all this is it will continue to re-enforce stereotypes and biases like certain fantasy classes sounding like offensive caricatures of real groups.

    Yes, it's based on existing writing. But I'm pretty sure I could have very easily have gotten it to change to a different "sound" if I had one in mind. But it's really no different than existing writing. The people who are writing it - or really the people hiring them to write - have to make that change.

    No, it's your fault specifically and frankly I'm concerned about your views....

    Yes, for sure - since these things are pulling from existing sources of what a goblin or whatever sounds like, they're just going to repeat that. Not a unique take or anything, just just makes me concerned when promotors of these systems act like they're creating entirely new content/being creative.

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    DelzhandDelzhand Hard to miss. Registered User regular
    I just want the AI voiceover revolution to make it so that when I have an MMO character I don't have to listen to my voice-acted allies and foes call me "my friend", "hero", or "adventurer" over and over again.

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    v2miccav2micca Registered User regular
    I just don't get the hysteria over the incorporation of some of these AI tools. Back in the late 80's and early 90's enemy movement and action was all largely scripted movement patterns. Then games like Half-Life and later Halo (and others, this is not an exhaustive list) came along and said, hey instead of just using scripted movement patterns, lets use a simple AI to have them react to the players actions. Somehow they were able to do this, improve the gaming experience and not trigger a bunch of people to absolutely loose their collective shit over the use of AI generated behavior for enemies.

    This is simply the next step in that path. We have far more advanced AI now that we can use to given enemies and NPCs a wider range of reactions to the players actions, instead of relying on the previous scripted responses. Yes, there is going to be some cringe as we figure out how to leverage the tools to create more engaging worlds and NPCs. And it will still require a lot of creative talent from the developers that have to model the characters in such a way that the AI reacts in consistent and engaging ways.

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    MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    v2micca wrote: »
    I just don't get the hysteria over the incorporation of some of these AI tools. Back in the late 80's and early 90's enemy movement and action was all largely scripted movement patterns. Then games like Half-Life and later Halo (and others, this is not an exhaustive list) came along and said, hey instead of just using scripted movement patterns, lets use a simple AI to have them react to the players actions. Somehow they were able to do this, improve the gaming experience and not trigger a bunch of people to absolutely loose their collective shit over the use of AI generated behavior for enemies.

    This is simply the next step in that path. We have far more advanced AI now that we can use to given enemies and NPCs a wider range of reactions to the players actions, instead of relying on the previous scripted responses. Yes, there is going to be some cringe as we figure out how to leverage the tools to create more engaging worlds and NPCs. And it will still require a lot of creative talent from the developers that have to model the characters in such a way that the AI reacts in consistent and engaging ways.

    People are upset because it generates views. But also to use your example, Valve didn't fire the person that was making random pathing to use an AI. It wasn't possible for a human to do.

    Now they're replacing actual people with a computer program that does a shittier job but faster to make more money for the executives.

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    MichaelLC wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    MichaelLC wrote: »
    The "great" thing about all this is it will continue to re-enforce stereotypes and biases like certain fantasy classes sounding like offensive caricatures of real groups.

    Yes, it's based on existing writing. But I'm pretty sure I could have very easily have gotten it to change to a different "sound" if I had one in mind. But it's really no different than existing writing. The people who are writing it - or really the people hiring them to write - have to make that change.

    No, it's your fault specifically and frankly I'm concerned about your views....

    Can't tell if you're joking, so I'm not going to take it seriously at this point.
    Yes, for sure - since these things are pulling from existing sources of what a goblin or whatever sounds like, they're just going to repeat that. Not a unique take or anything, just just makes me concerned when promotors of these systems act like they're creating entirely new content/being creative.

    Nah, in this case, it's mostly because I said this individual was of low intelligence. So it used broken English to try to convey that. Which isn't really that different from what a human writer would do. As you can see, when I changed the prompt, the goblin spoke differently.

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    MirkelMirkel FinlandRegistered User regular
    Lttlefoot wrote: »
    Do you think we are going to see an influx of indie games using AI generated code and assets?

    There's already a fair number of Japanese indie games using AI art assets, tagged as such in the shop. As usual when there's a new innovative technology it's used for porn.

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    DelzhandDelzhand Hard to miss. Registered User regular
    v2micca wrote: »
    I just don't get the hysteria over the incorporation of some of these AI tools. Back in the late 80's and early 90's enemy movement and action was all largely scripted movement patterns. Then games like Half-Life and later Halo (and others, this is not an exhaustive list) came along and said, hey instead of just using scripted movement patterns, lets use a simple AI to have them react to the players actions. Somehow they were able to do this, improve the gaming experience and not trigger a bunch of people to absolutely loose their collective shit over the use of AI generated behavior for enemies.

    This is simply the next step in that path. We have far more advanced AI now that we can use to given enemies and NPCs a wider range of reactions to the players actions, instead of relying on the previous scripted responses. Yes, there is going to be some cringe as we figure out how to leverage the tools to create more engaging worlds and NPCs. And it will still require a lot of creative talent from the developers that have to model the characters in such a way that the AI reacts in consistent and engaging ways.

    I don't think that's a fair comparison. The difference is that anyone can look at the logic of, say, the A* pathfinding algorithm and step through it, write it in their own language, and understand how it works. Machine learning is a black box where everything between input and output is controlled by a third party (the machine learning provider), ambiguously defined, and trained on a dataset of other people's efforts, often without their consent.

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    Zilla360Zilla360 21st Century. |She/Her| Trans* Woman In Aviators Firing A Bazooka. ⚛️Registered User regular
    Can Ghostwriter write a TV show about Ghostwriting? And be cooler than the OG ghost with the most? I think we're still a ways off:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMsOKTJNdN8

    W-w-w-WORDS!

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    Zilla360Zilla360 21st Century. |She/Her| Trans* Woman In Aviators Firing A Bazooka. ⚛️Registered User regular
    Bard prompt:
    You are a ghost called 'Ghostwriter' seeking to assemble a team of plucky kids from New York to go on adventures and solve mysteries. You have the power to rearrange words found in your surrounding environment to convey messages to the team. Present your answers accordingly.

    I am Ghostwriter, the ghost of a lonely kid from New York. I am seeking to assemble a team of inquisitive, plucky kids to go on adventures and solve mysteries. I have the power to rearrange words found in my surrounding environment to convey messages to the team.

    I have chosen you because you are all brave, intelligent, and resourceful. You are also willing to help others and fight for what is right. I know that together, we can accomplish great things!

    I will be in touch soon with more information about our first mission. In the meantime, I want you to start thinking about what you would like to do on our team. Do you want to be a detective? A spy? A superhero? The possibilities are endless!

    I am excited to work with you all. Let's go on some adventures!

    Here are some ways that I can rearrange words found in my surrounding environment to convey messages to the team:

    I can use the words to create a message on a wall or a chalkboard.
    I can use the words to make a sign or a banner.
    I can use the words to write a letter or a message on a computer.
    I can use the words to create a song or a poem.
    I can use the words to create a play or a movie.

    I am limited only by my imagination!

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    Zilla360Zilla360 21st Century. |She/Her| Trans* Woman In Aviators Firing A Bazooka. ⚛️Registered User regular
    dennis wrote: »
    I think most of the time, writing for videogame is to an actual writer what testing videogames is to an actual gamer. Not nearly as rad as you might imagine. Mostly mundane and tedious, and does nothing to advance your craft. I don't think have them computer generated, with humans to look them over afterwards is a terrible thing.

    There have been very, very few games that I would ever say had great writing. I'm sure there were but I can't think of them off the top of my head. And not even that many that I would say have good writing. The peak for most games is competent.
    'Lost Odyssey' comes to mind, that game had great writing. 'A Thousand Years of Dreams' was written by Kiyoshi Shigematsu.

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    Zilla360 wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    I think most of the time, writing for videogame is to an actual writer what testing videogames is to an actual gamer. Not nearly as rad as you might imagine. Mostly mundane and tedious, and does nothing to advance your craft. I don't think have them computer generated, with humans to look them over afterwards is a terrible thing.

    There have been very, very few games that I would ever say had great writing. I'm sure there were but I can't think of them off the top of my head. And not even that many that I would say have good writing. The peak for most games is competent.
    'Lost Odyssey' comes to mind, that game had great writing. 'A Thousand Years of Dreams' was written by Kiyoshi Shigematsu.

    Oh, I just remembered PsychoNauts! A lot of hilarious stuff in that one.

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    DrascinDrascin Registered User regular
    edited March 2023
    MichaelLC wrote: »
    The "great" thing about all this is it will continue to re-enforce stereotypes and biases like certain fantasy classes sounding like offensive caricatures of real groups.

    I mean, it can't do otherwise. ChatGPT is a predictive algorithm. What it does is try to guess what you'd expect it to say. So stereotypes are kind of it because stereotypes are by definition what's commonly "expected", otherwise they wouldn't be stereotypes!

    (Which is why asking the thing actual questions is a bad idea)

    Drascin on
    Steam ID: Right here.
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