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Mark Waid back on the Flash

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Posts

  • BlankspaceBlankspace __BANNED USERS regular
    edited June 2007
    MuddBudd wrote: »
    I'm kind of disappointed by Bart at the end there.
    Trying to kill Inertia at the last second so the Black Flash will take him instead? That's not very heroic. Or cop-like (even for an LA cop).
    I took it as he was thinking that the Black Flash was there for Inertia, not him. He wasn't trying to substitute himself, he was trying to do what he believed was supposed to happen.

    Blankspace on
    SIG.gif
  • LuxLux Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    blankspace wrote: »
    MuddBudd wrote: »
    I'm kind of disappointed by Bart at the end there.
    Trying to kill Inertia at the last second so the Black Flash will take him instead? That's not very heroic. Or cop-like (even for an LA cop).
    I took it as he was thinking that the Black Flash was there for Inertia, not him. He wasn't trying to substitute himself, he was trying to do what he believed was supposed to happen.

    Even then, if he didn't, Val wouldn't be able to succeed in her plans and the west coast would have exploded.

    Or whatever.

    Lux on
  • MuddBuddMuddBudd Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    blankspace wrote: »
    MuddBudd wrote: »
    I'm kind of disappointed by Bart at the end there.
    Trying to kill Inertia at the last second so the Black Flash will take him instead? That's not very heroic. Or cop-like (even for an LA cop).
    I took it as he was thinking that the Black Flash was there for Inertia, not him. He wasn't trying to substitute himself, he was trying to do what he believed was supposed to happen.
    Still, not a seconds hesitation when he thought that he was destined to beat someone to death. It still bugs me, just a bit. It just seemed a bit more violent than necessary.

    MuddBudd on
    There's no plan, there's no race to be run
    The harder the rain, honey, the sweeter the sun.
  • BlankspaceBlankspace __BANNED USERS regular
    edited June 2007
    MuddBudd wrote: »
    blankspace wrote: »
    MuddBudd wrote: »
    I'm kind of disappointed by Bart at the end there.
    Trying to kill Inertia at the last second so the Black Flash will take him instead? That's not very heroic. Or cop-like (even for an LA cop).
    I took it as he was thinking that the Black Flash was there for Inertia, not him. He wasn't trying to substitute himself, he was trying to do what he believed was supposed to happen.
    Still, not a seconds hesitation when the thought that he was destined to beat someone to death. It still bugs me, just a bit.
    Just because someone is willing to kill doesn't make them any less of a hero, despite what Superman and Batman think. See: Wonder Woman and Aquaman.

    Blankspace on
    SIG.gif
  • HooraydiationHooraydiation Registered User
    edited June 2007
    Just to be clear, we aren't supposed to sympathize with Inertia, right? Because shooting up just to be Bart's equal, on top of his appearances in Impulse, kind of push me in that direction, and yet Bart's been pretty ruthless towards him after the aging.

    Hooraydiation on
    Home-1.jpg
  • MuddBuddMuddBudd Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Just to be clear, we aren't supposed to sympathize with Inertia, right? Because shooting up just to be Bart's equal, on top of his appearances in Impulse, kind of push me in that direction, and yet Bart's been pretty ruthless towards him after the aging.

    That's part of my problem here. Inertia is Bart's 'cloned' twin brother. He only turned out that way because they raised him as a weapon against Bart. I feel sympathy for him.

    MuddBudd on
    There's no plan, there's no race to be run
    The harder the rain, honey, the sweeter the sun.
  • OwenashiOwenashi Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    An interview with Mark Waid has been put up on Wizard's web-site, going over his feelings on the Flash-related events this week as well as what he has planned for for All-Flash and the next issue of the regular series.
    http://www.wizarduniverse.com/magazine/wizard/004909187.cfm
    Wizard: All that fun stuff being said, being the co-creator of Bart Allen and seeing all of the things that have happened to him since you left the book—through Teen Titans, through to becoming the Flash and now dying—does it get to a certain point where you kind of accept that these characters have a life of their own? When you first heard that Bart was going to die in this story, what was your reaction?

    WAID: Honestly, I have to say that there was almost a sense of relief to it because I think that some real missteps….Look, a lot of good people handled Bart after Humberto [Ramos] and I left. There were a lot of good writers who handled it. I think that on an editorial level, there was some panic on the Impulse series about the back half of it where they didn’t quite know what to do with it, and so they decided that it was a superhero book. It was never a superhero book. It was a comedy. So the moment that you made it a superhero book, then you run into the problem that we ran into originally when we created the character, which was, “How can this be different than Flash?” So once you make it a superhero book, then it’s Flash. Nice going. Ever since then, I think that the character has been through so many different hands, both good and bad, that now it’s really hard to get a fix on the character, and he just doesn’t seem like the same guy to me anymore. So, I will miss Bart. I will miss the royalties stream—thanks, Dan. But these stories aren’t necessarily over yet either.

    Wizard: Once Wally is fully reintegrated into the DCU, does the book pick up by saying, “Here’s a family of folks who can run fast”?

    WAID: Oh, no. Not even remotely, and that was the last thing that we were interested in. The kids who are now—the girl is 10 and the boy is 8, at least physically. They’re fraternal twins, but at this point the Speed Force, the way that it’s interacted with their young bodies, has just kind of catapulted them up in age, as with Bart, in a very short period of time. So they’re now 8 and 10. They have speed powers, but they’re not running powers. They manifest themselves in different ways.

    Wizard: So, how do you think fans are going to respond to all of this? It seems like it took Wally so long to become the one true Flash and then we lost him. Are you expecting joyous jumping in the streets with his return, or are you expecting people scratching their heads, or are you just going to stay off the Internet for a while?

    WAID: Dude, believe me, I’m staying off the Internet. I’m actually having the DSL modem taken out of my house. I don’t know. It’s a complete crapshoot. We live in a world where people are celebratory about the fact that Tony Stark is a villain. I just can’t worry about that. All I can do is be true and faithful to how I perceive the characters. All I can really do is try to make something interesting out of Wally’s new status quo and try to give you stuff that you’ve never seen before in a Flash book. The shortfall to my coming back is if it had been, “Okay, I’m coming back and everything is going to be exactly the same as it was when I left except that they have two newlywed kids” or whatever…then why am I bothering to come back? What can I possibly say about these characters that I haven’t said over the last hundred issues that I did? So the new status quo is a whole new approach.

    Owenashi on
  • BriareosBriareos Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    blankspace wrote: »
    MuddBudd wrote: »
    blankspace wrote: »
    MuddBudd wrote: »
    I'm kind of disappointed by Bart at the end there.
    Trying to kill Inertia at the last second so the Black Flash will take him instead? That's not very heroic. Or cop-like (even for an LA cop).
    I took it as he was thinking that the Black Flash was there for Inertia, not him. He wasn't trying to substitute himself, he was trying to do what he believed was supposed to happen.
    Still, not a seconds hesitation when the thought that he was destined to beat someone to death. It still bugs me, just a bit.
    Just because someone is willing to kill doesn't make them any less of a hero, despite what Superman and Batman think. See: Wonder Woman and Aquaman.

    See also: Hal Jordan in DC The New Frontier. Survival is a powerful instinct.

    Briareos on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Devlin_DragonusDevlin_Dragonus Gorgeous Dallas, TXRegistered User regular
    edited June 2007
    GimpyBoy wrote: »
    Squashua wrote: »
    Briareos wrote: »
    Yeah, I read the whole Lightning Saga, it just made no damn sense to me at all. Thanks for explaining it, because I really though the whole point was
    to bring Wally back, not capture someone else.

    Nah.
    Wally was 100% side-effect. In fact, if you read Brainiac 5's words carefully "West?", it looks like Wally was almost completely unexpected. Then-again, lumped with Timber Wolf's comments about Hal no longer having to be alone, it's a tad confusing.
    It seems a bit coincidental that they would come back in time to the exact moment that Bart dies and releases the speed force to bring back Barry. Besides, isn't there a DC rule that no matter what happens Barry has to return to the run that killed him?

    Maybe I'm just holding on to hope that Bart's not dead. Enough Titans have died lately.

    I dont know if anyone noticed this, but i think that the part in where
    Bart is dying in Vals arms, he starts saying wally, like he sensed the moment he returned, meaning that wallys return in JLA#10 coincides with Flash #13.


    Also about the Brainiac comment, i was confused when he said that Hal will "No longer be alone", because it was Wally who returned. I was like " but The Flash that Hal was closest to was Barry".

    And then you guys told me who was in the lightning rod and it all made sense.

    Devlin_Dragonus on
    I got nothing for you now. Try again later.

  • mugginnsmugginns Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    blankspace wrote: »
    MuddBudd wrote: »
    blankspace wrote: »
    MuddBudd wrote: »
    I'm kind of disappointed by Bart at the end there.
    Trying to kill Inertia at the last second so the Black Flash will take him instead? That's not very heroic. Or cop-like (even for an LA cop).
    I took it as he was thinking that the Black Flash was there for Inertia, not him. He wasn't trying to substitute himself, he was trying to do what he believed was supposed to happen.
    Still, not a seconds hesitation when the thought that he was destined to beat someone to death. It still bugs me, just a bit.
    Just because someone is willing to kill doesn't make them any less of a hero, despite what Superman and Batman think. See: Wonder Woman and Aquaman.
    I definitely was convinced he thought that the Black Flash was there to take Impulse. Pretty cool death I thought, kinda old school.

    mugginns on
    E26cO.jpg
  • FuruFuru Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Owenashi wrote: »
    An interview with Mark Waid has been put up on Wizard's web-site, going over his feelings on the Flash-related events this week as well as what he has planned for for All-Flash and the next issue of the regular series.
    http://www.wizarduniverse.com/magazine/wizard/004909187.cfm
    Wizard: All that fun stuff being said, being the co-creator of Bart Allen and seeing all of the things that have happened to him since you left the book—through Teen Titans, through to becoming the Flash and now dying—does it get to a certain point where you kind of accept that these characters have a life of their own? When you first heard that Bart was going to die in this story, what was your reaction?

    WAID: Honestly, I have to say that there was almost a sense of relief to it because I think that some real missteps….Look, a lot of good people handled Bart after Humberto [Ramos] and I left. There were a lot of good writers who handled it. I think that on an editorial level, there was some panic on the Impulse series about the back half of it where they didn’t quite know what to do with it, and so they decided that it was a superhero book. It was never a superhero book. It was a comedy. So the moment that you made it a superhero book, then you run into the problem that we ran into originally when we created the character, which was, “How can this be different than Flash?” So once you make it a superhero book, then it’s Flash. Nice going. Ever since then, I think that the character has been through so many different hands, both good and bad, that now it’s really hard to get a fix on the character, and he just doesn’t seem like the same guy to me anymore. So, I will miss Bart. I will miss the royalties stream—thanks, Dan. But these stories aren’t necessarily over yet either.

    Wizard: Once Wally is fully reintegrated into the DCU, does the book pick up by saying, “Here’s a family of folks who can run fast”?

    WAID: Oh, no. Not even remotely, and that was the last thing that we were interested in. The kids who are now—the girl is 10 and the boy is 8, at least physically. They’re fraternal twins, but at this point the Speed Force, the way that it’s interacted with their young bodies, has just kind of catapulted them up in age, as with Bart, in a very short period of time. So they’re now 8 and 10. They have speed powers, but they’re not running powers. They manifest themselves in different ways.

    Wizard: So, how do you think fans are going to respond to all of this? It seems like it took Wally so long to become the one true Flash and then we lost him. Are you expecting joyous jumping in the streets with his return, or are you expecting people scratching their heads, or are you just going to stay off the Internet for a while?

    WAID: Dude, believe me, I’m staying off the Internet. I’m actually having the DSL modem taken out of my house. I don’t know. It’s a complete crapshoot. We live in a world where people are celebratory about the fact that Tony Stark is a villain. I just can’t worry about that. All I can do is be true and faithful to how I perceive the characters. All I can really do is try to make something interesting out of Wally’s new status quo and try to give you stuff that you’ve never seen before in a Flash book. The shortfall to my coming back is if it had been, “Okay, I’m coming back and everything is going to be exactly the same as it was when I left except that they have two newlywed kids” or whatever…then why am I bothering to come back? What can I possibly say about these characters that I haven’t said over the last hundred issues that I did? So the new status quo is a whole new approach.

    Goddamn Mark Waid is good people.

    Furu on
  • MuddBuddMuddBudd Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    That answers a question I had... With all that exposure to the speed force, will his family have powers?

    Now I know :)

    MuddBudd on
    There's no plan, there's no race to be run
    The harder the rain, honey, the sweeter the sun.
  • SalmonOfDoubtSalmonOfDoubt Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    1182534223662zu6.jpg

    SalmonOfDoubt on
    heavensidesig80.jpg
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    killing children would be hilarious
    Olivaw wrote: »
    HELLO AND WELCOME TO THE PENNY ARCADE FORUMS

    PLEASE ENJOY YOUR STAY

    AND THIS PENIS
    Man, I don't want to read about this lady's broken vagina.
    NotACrook wrote: »
    I am sitting here trying to come up with a tiered system for rating child molesters.
    cock vore is fuckin hilarious
  • Garlic BreadGarlic Bread Registered User, Disagreeable regular
    edited June 2007
    oh man i totally forgot about that

    i love you salmon

    Garlic Bread on
  • Sars_BoySars_Boy Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    hell yes

    Sars_Boy on
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