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Jobs

Professor SnugglesworthProfessor Snugglesworth Registered User regular
edited February 2008 in Debate and/or Discourse
That pretty much says it, doesn't it? I tried to think up a witty quote, but I must confess that I've never seen Clerks. Sorry.

In this thread, I'd like all participants to list your current employment, how you got there, and what you'd like to do next, if applicable.

My highest education as of now is an Associates in Arts degree at community college, and I currently work at a major credit card company (hint: seinfeld starred in their commercials) as a customer service rep who also sells ticket information for exclusive events.

The job is a fulltime position that offers a modest salary and several perks, including paid vacaction, health insurance, and even tuition reimbursment. It's a far cry from any previous job I've ever had, and I'm very thankful I was given the oppurtunity.

There's just one problem: I'm growing very sick of the job. It's only been six months but all I can think of is doing something else. This has nothing to do with the work environment (it's very nice and everyone is nice), or the long hours (I'm sitting in front of a PC, not much different from what I do at home): I'm just sick of working with customers.

Some days, I hardly get any calls at all, so it's nice and quiet. Other days, the majority of customers are kind old gents who thank you for the assistance and rate you accordingly (those ratings go toward a monthly bonus that increases or decreases as such).

But other days, the calls are nonstop and the customers as a majority are a bunch of angry, middle american ungrateful shits. I've gotten pretty tired of buttering up these assholes that call up and tell me to fuck off when I can't comply with their ludicrious demands, or when they're told of the very obvious consequences of not being able to manage a card that they were too stupid to use in the first place.

Bottom line, I hate customer service. I hate having to jump hoops to get some stranger's approval and sit there and let him bitch endlessly into my ear. I feel that I'm too old and too intelligent to make this a permanent career. My collegues are all a bunch of great folks, but I can tell that they come from a poorer upbringing and don't have the same education I do.

I feel I can do better. I want to do better. But the biggest factor that prevents me from doing so is that I just can't decide what I want to enroll in, either for a bachelor's degree or a certification. I'm currently researching some courses I could take online (since this job has me working until night), but it could still take a while until I decide on what I want to do.

Until then, I have no idea if I could find a non-customer related job with the same perks and benefits as my current job. I have an AA degree, and I was hoping that could qualify me for something higher profile, but I went through hell and half a year trying to find a job until I walked right into this company's job fair one weekend. But I do know that customer service isn't for me, and I'll continue to stick with this job until I find something better despite the stress of dealing with these assholes.

But hopefully I can get some ideas what to do with my life when I see what jobs you guys are doing, or what you plan to do in the future.

Professor Snugglesworth on
«1345

Posts

  • Satan.Satan. __BANNED USERS regular
    edited January 2008
    AV Aide I, Instructional Media Center/Academic Computing and Network Services at Michigan State University.

    I got the job by waking up that morning and knowing how to work a VCR/DVD player, powered speaker and video projector in tandem. No, seriously.


    I'm just a student right now but hey, I want to keep tabs on the thread.

    Satan. on
  • amateurhouramateurhour One day I'll be professionalhour The woods somewhere in TennesseeRegistered User regular
    edited January 2008
    IT Technician for a state government organization, pretty much the middle end of the IT totem pole.

    I got the job by deciding that I hated my degree in criminology, and I hated being a corrections officer. I knew I was good with computers so I took the IT test and did well on it and here I am.

    I'd like to move into media focused IT, like setting up cameras and doing mixer work and special effects. I need a lot more school for that though, which is a problem right now. Also, I'd like to see any of the things that i've written and/or filmed make it into the public domain and gain notoriety.

    amateurhour on
    are YOU on the beer list?
  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I got the job by deciding that I hated my degree in criminology, and I hated being a corrections officer.
    You're a former prison guard? That explains so much.

    I'm a Project Manager for a transition project for a medical software company. It's a one-year temp-to-hire position, and I started less than a week ago. I see myself hopefully working here in a year. So far, I really like both the people and the work environment.

    Thanatos on
  • Satan.Satan. __BANNED USERS regular
    edited January 2008
    IT Technician for a state government organization, pretty much the middle end of the IT totem pole.

    I got the job by deciding that I hated my degree in criminology, and I hated being a corrections officer. I knew I was good with computers so I took the IT test and did well on it and here I am.

    I'd like to move into media focused IT, like setting up cameras and doing mixer work and special effects. I need a lot more school for that though, which is a problem right now. Also, I'd like to see any of the things that i've written and/or filmed make it into the public domain and gain notoriety.
    Not as much as you think. A branch of IMC/ACNS does work like this and they're mostly electricians.

    Satan. on
  • Professor SnugglesworthProfessor Snugglesworth Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    IT Technician for a state government organization, pretty much the middle end of the IT totem pole.

    I got the job by deciding that I hated my degree in criminology, and I hated being a corrections officer. I knew I was good with computers so I took the IT test and did well on it and here I am.

    I'd like to move into media focused IT, like setting up cameras and doing mixer work and special effects. I need a lot more school for that though, which is a problem right now. Also, I'd like to see any of the things that i've written and/or filmed make it into the public domain and gain notoriety.

    Now this is very interesting, because I'm juggling with those two very subjects right now. I can't decide whether to take a profession in IT or Criminology.

    For the latter, the only thing I have to go by is shows like Law and Order, but I've always been fascinated with the idea of contributing to catching the bad guys out there. My only concern is that many careers require you to spend some time as a cop. And well, I'd like to not get shot.

    As for IT, I tried to get a certification in Managment Information Systems, but I hit a snag where the classes suddenly changed from "retard easy" to "now I'M the retard" hard. I want to finish it, but my community college only has the courses at night, which I can no longer take now that I have this job. I'm trying to see if I can finish the courses in another school, preferably online, but so far I haven't found anything. There's a lot of IT specific careers and I have no idea which one appeals to my online talents, if any.

    Professor Snugglesworth on
  • LaOsLaOs SaskatoonRegistered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Thinatos wrote: »
    I got the job by deciding that I hated my degree in criminology, and I hated being a corrections officer.
    You're a former prison guard? That explains so much.

    I'm a Project Manager for a transition project for a medical software company. It's a one-year temp-to-hire position, and I started less than a week ago. I see myself hopefully working here in a year. So far, I really like both the people and the work environment.

    Hey man, congrats on the job!


    I currently work as an Administrative Officer at a livestock genetics diagnostic laboratory. I started as a temp-to-perm position with Kelly Services and got hired on officially with this company two months into that position. I have been here with the company for a year but have started looking for other opportunities in the city. My wage is low for the position and field and the wage progression/advancement opportunities are quite disappointing. Hopefully I can line something up here in the next little while.

    LaOs on
  • amateurhouramateurhour One day I'll be professionalhour The woods somewhere in TennesseeRegistered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Thinatos wrote: »
    I got the job by deciding that I hated my degree in criminology, and I hated being a corrections officer.
    You're a former prison guard? That explains so much.

    I'm a Project Manager for a transition project for a medical software company. It's a one-year temp-to-hire position, and I started less than a week ago. I see myself hopefully working here in a year. So far, I really like both the people and the work environment.

    for the record, I only took the job because I was too young out of college to get into FBI or US marshalls or the like, and I couldn't get a job as a local cop because departments are only hiring returning war vets right now since it's cheaper and they're already trained.

    amateurhour on
    are YOU on the beer list?
  • TheMarshalTheMarshal Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I'm a senior J2ME engineer. In other words, I make games for cell phones. I graduated with a CS degree back in '03 and then waited tables for a year 'cause I couldn't find any companies who were hiring. I got a break in the form of a QA job at Sony, which I was planning on using to shoehorn my way into the video game industry. After exhausting my year-long contract there, I got a QA job at the company I currently work for, who is many times smaller than Sony.

    A few months in, I caught wind that they were looking for engineers. So I borrowed someone's J2ME book and applied. I don't think I wow-ed anyone with my skills, but I managed to prove that I could pick this stuff up quickly. I was the 4th engineer on staff and now we have close to 30, so I've definitely got the "seniority" bit.

    I don't know what I'd like to do next. I can see myself programming for at least a few more years, but part of me wants to get out. Maybe make the move to management, maybe change industries altogether. Law school has been an idea I've been toying with for a while. My girlfriend is about to start working on her Master's degree, so I'll be putting off any major career changes at least until she's out.

    TheMarshal on
  • DrezDrez Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Jobs: Not a fan.

    Drez on
    Switch: SW-7690-2320-9238Steam/PSN/Xbox: Drezdar
  • amateurhouramateurhour One day I'll be professionalhour The woods somewhere in TennesseeRegistered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I want to major in criminology, and it's a really really bad idea, should I do it?

    Don't do it. Stick with IT, for the love of god. I left IT to get into crim with these delusions of grandeur and now I'm 25 and I don't even know if I could still get into law school and even if I could I can't afford it.

    If you want law and order, get a degree in history or english lit and go to law school, unless your college has pre-law, and do that instead.

    Otherwise stick with IT.

    amateurhour on
    are YOU on the beer list?
  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    For the latter, the only thing I have to go buy is shows like Law and Order, but I've always been fascinated with the idea of contributing to catching the bad guys out there. My only concern is that many careers require you to spend some time as a cop. And well, I'd like to not get shot.
    The list of jobs more dangerous than "cop" is massive. "Cop" doesn't even make the top ten. Statistically speaking, you're way more likely to be killed in a car wreck on your way to the station than be shot as a cop.

    Thanatos on
  • QuidQuid Definitely not a banana Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    We've had a similar thread, but this seems more thorough, so why not?

    I'm a Personnel Specialist Third Class in the U.S. Navy. Not that that means much specifically outside of making me a desk monkey that probably knows about pay. My specific job right now is to get activated reservists onto active duty pay accounts, and separating active duty reservists from active duty. It's frustratingly complicated at times since we use computer programs either decades old or brand new based and completely unusable in some cases. In my 3.5 years in I've gotten at least a little experience in almost everything my job is supposed to entail.

    Of course, being military my job means I ended up inadvertently getting extra training in things not related to what I normally do in any way possible. I've received experience setting up and operating a hurricane shelter, driving a Humvee in a convoy or on its own off road, navigating with a compass and degree points, how and when to use advanced combat medic techniques (fortunately just the training), how to aim and shoot a grenade launcher (expert!), etc. I also spent nearly a year in Iraq as a detainee guard, both maintaining and updating the database for our 1k+ detainees and also physically guarding and escorting them. This was, by far, the worst part of my job that at times made me act like a worse person than I am, but I still don't regret volunteering to do it. If I hadn't someone much worse than me most likely would have gone and it's also given me a massive appreciation for how nice I have it at even the worst of times.

    I got in to the Navy because despite what libertarians believe the free market hates poor people. The best I could manage at 19 was busboy and I didn't have any options. One of the guys I knew at work left for the Navy and it seemed like he was already accomplishing more than myself at that point. Also, one tooth had already rotted out of my mouth and I had an abscessed wisdom tooth so that helped decide too.

    Sadly, during my in processing I didn't get any sleep one night and fell asleep during an important test so I got stuck with the above job(s) for my first four years. Furthermore, by freak chance I was put on shore duty in Gulfport fucking Mississippi for my first duty despite explicitly requesting anything overseas or on a ship.

    The good news is that in the next few months (Presumably. We'll know for certain when when the actual orders arrive) I'll be leaving for Monterrey California for the job I initially planned on going in to. I'll receive training in a foreign language (Probably Chinese or Arabic), a sizable bonus depending on the language, and a high clearance along with some nice orders to pick from since I'll have prior naval service already. It'll be a very nice change of pace from data entry I've been stuck with. After that I'll most likely be separating from the Navy barring making officer since civilian jobs for interpreters with clearances pay way better than enlisted.

    Quid on
  • DortmunderDortmunder Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I'm a web developer for a company near Montreal that runs several business-to-business websites, including the two that I work on.

    I started off not knowing what the hell I wanted to do with my life, danced briefly with architectural drawing before I discovered the wonderful world of coding. Took a year-and-a-half intensive to get my certificate, worked a bit developing software for travel agencies and then landed this job when a friend of mine called me up.

    What would I like to do next? Write fantastic fiction.

    Dortmunder on
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  • amateurhouramateurhour One day I'll be professionalhour The woods somewhere in TennesseeRegistered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I wish I could have gotten into the military, but I've got three metal screws in one of my ankles.

    amateurhour on
    are YOU on the beer list?
  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I'm a University drop out, originally studied Mech Eng with Aeronautics. Got some way into the subject and realised it really wasn't for me.

    I'm studying Web Application Development via distance learning, intending to make it a prelude to studying Comp Sci proper, though ideally I'd like to get into a position where I can work part time and devote more of my time to study. Don't know how feasible that's going to be, though.

    At the moment I'm a claims handler for a home insurance company, the company is huge so there's a lot of wiggle room if I want to change roles, and it's interesting enough to keep me going for the moment. I basically decide who gets what and how much of it, within a fairly broad and flexible set of guidelines. From what I hear, that's unusual enough within the Financial Services industry to make it worth hanging around.

    japan on
  • ZahaladeenZahaladeen Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I'm a writer for a newspaper in the Seattle, WA. area. I was a writer in L.A. (don't ask, a dark and evil time of my life) and eventually moved here. A friend of mine knew my work and hired me at a weekly that I still contribute to with political op/ed and hard news stories.

    I got my big break while doing an investigative piece on a fellow - Bob - who escaped from police custody and was eventually shot and killed in a small town. This town was also where the prison where he had been held for several years was kept, and in that prison was his uncle. His uncle's girlfriend lived in the same town, and when Bob escaped he fled to her apartment. Anyway, cops raided the house, Bob was shot and an officer actually lost a finger due to friendly fire. I did a records request and found that the Department of Corrections had the uncle talking with his girlfriend on the phone about the escape, even putting Bob on the phone. So DOC knew about the escape, where he was held up, and never told the town's police. A lot of misery could have been avoided if DOC did their job. In the end the warden was ousted.

    Now I work at a paper owned by the Washington Post, which is pretty exciting sometimes. My beat at the moment is religion, though I try and do as much video game/gamer culture pieces as possible.

    My dream ("That lives in me like a golden, flaming hawk") is to be a video game journalist. And by journalist, I mean in the traditional sense of the word. I am sure there are some good video game journalists out there, but not enough by my count. I'd like to be one of the people who goes in and contributes to fixing the problems that exist in the industry, specifically in regards to a true lack of objectivity (especially when you are reviewing the very game that is paying $ for ads on your site).

    So yeah... video game journalism. That, or help produce a few games. I can has writing job kkthx.

    Zahaladeen on
  • LewieP's MummyLewieP's Mummy Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Parenting coordinator for local govt. I train staff to deliver courses/support parents, evaluate the impact of their work, write policy, coordinate stuff, manage a poxy budget and work directly with parents. Its the best job I've ever had, I work 1/2 time, which is good cos I'm busy away from work.
    Before this I was a management development trainer for a different local govt.. for a long time.
    I've a teaching degree, a post grad diploma and a master's in HR - evaluation of training, and have just had to defer a Ph.D cos my dad is sick.
    I started as a volunteer working with parents for a national charity, discovered I loved training, and am good at it, then found out it was a real career, so went for it. My employer paid for the master's.

    Find out what you enjoy the most, see if you can do it as a volunteer when you're not at work. Look around in your company, is there something you could do as a secondment/temporary post - that's how I found out I didn't like employee relations work in a heavily unionised business.

    I'm planning to finish the Ph.D at some point, but I'm only doing it cos I want to, it won't help me progress in my current job, its because I love learning stuff (and LewieP says its just so I can be called Dr Procter before him!).

    LewieP's Mummy on
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  • GooeyGooey (\/)┌¶─¶┐(\/) pinch pinchRegistered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I am a Project Manager for a small (Relative to Exxon. We're a Fortune 250 company.) independent oil company. I do "project manager stuff" which at times amounts to "baby sitting".

    I'm in the process of rolling off my current project of implementing an IT-centric portfolio management tool and internationally-aligned project management methodology. I've got a few blips coming up around q2 of this year, and in q3 we should be ready to start my next project on the next phase of the umbrella program I've been working under for the last year. That is if we can get executive comittment.

    I recieved a degree in Information Management in college and promptly decided that I absolutely did not want to work in IT for a living, so I got myself onto a project management track. PM is a core competency that spans all business. Running an IT project really isn't too much different than running an offshore well project other than the costs, risks, manpower and terminology involved.

    Within 5 years I plan on getting my MBA with a specialization in marketing or entrepeneurship and creating my own startup - probably in the tech sector because that is where the majority of my personal network lies. I'm thinking something like a small, localized business process/program management/project management consulting company utilizing my contacts in Energy for high profile/profit margin contracts. Anyway, the catch is that since oil is $100/bbl and the energy industry is aging rapidly (average age is 44 or so) energy companies are paying out the wazoo to keep young guys like myself. Which makes it hard to leave.

    Gooey on
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  • Satan.Satan. __BANNED USERS regular
    edited January 2008
    Quid... I had no idea. I'm really impressed!

    Satan. on
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I got my PhD in Computer Engineering a couple of months ago. Right now I'm doing a post-doc.

    My ultimate goal is to get a professor job. I've applied to every university in Canada that had an opening in my field, but university recruitment is a slow process so I've got months ahead of me before I hear anything. Moreover, getting a professor job is hard; universities typically get 100 applicants for each job, and as a new graduate I can expect most of them to have more experience and publications than I do.

    Richy on
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  • quaker0quaker0 Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Currently: Executive Assistant @ BBC

    Wannabe: Firefighter. Just finished EMT school, and just getting started on the hiring process (CPAT test, written test, interview, background check, etc.)

    Reasons: I've worked since I was 16. I graduated HS early at age 15.5, started college full time at 17 with a full ride scholarship. I got very bored. I quit school, moved to CA, and have done various office jobs for the last 8 years. I hate it. I've always wanted to be a firefighter, but foolishly abandoned the pursuit when I first went into college. Now I'm back on track and actually excited about a job for the first time in my life.

    quaker0 on
  • deadonthestreetdeadonthestreet Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    My last job was an internship at the local legal services office.

    We'd go into housing court on eviction day, and try to pick up as many cases as we could. Basically, I would approach an unrepresented tenant before their trial or mediation started, and give them some legal advice. I'd go through all the possible defenses and counterclaims that can arise, and write up an answer for them. Then, usually when the landlord saw that the tenant had representation, they'd negotiate with us. So pretty much I'd try and find a resolution that didn't leave my tenant homeless. Sometimes we'd go in with a third party mediator, instead of a one on one negotiation.

    I think in the three months I was on the job I kept like ten or so people from getting evicted. It was kinda interesting, but the people were entirely too ungrateful generally for me to want to do it long term.

    I'm now finishing up my last semester of school, with no idea what I'll do after I graduate.

    deadonthestreet on
  • SevorakSevorak Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I'm a software engineer at a drilling equipment supply company. I'm usually working on a surveying program that allows drill operators to get a meaningful view of the data collected by our tools. I can't really get into anything more specific since I'm under NDA.

    I got the job by being awesome in the hardest class in the Computer Science department at my university and saying yes when the professor asked if I wanted a job. I think I was technically a consultant to the company that I now work for officially, who hired me after two years of consulting work once I graduated in December.

    I'm not sure what I want to do next. I like my job and it pays well, but there's the whole being part of the evil oil empire thing. It's also awesome in that I'm able to stay in my awesome college town with all my awesome friends, many of which will be here next year as well. But part of me wants to see how working for one of the bigger tech companies up in silicon valley is. I'll definitely be weighing my options until June when I may have to move out of my current house.

    Sevorak on
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  • QuidQuid Definitely not a banana Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Make the startup Gooey.

    I will translate for you and act as general tough guy.

    We will rule with iron fists.
    Quid... I had no idea. I'm really impressed!
    Thank you.

    Quid on
  • zakkielzakkiel Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Second lieutenant, U.S. Army, Engineer. Right now I'm on permissive TDY at Ft Lewis. I will be either finding IEDs or managing construction in the near future. I'll know which as soon as they bother to tell me what battalion I'm going to.

    zakkiel on
    Account not recoverable. So long.
  • QuidQuid Definitely not a banana Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    My brother's up there with the Green Beret. Nice place.

    Quid on
  • zakkielzakkiel Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Quid wrote: »
    My brother's up there with the Green Beret. Nice place.

    Most requested post in the Army. I had to switch assignments to get it. It's pretty awesome so far.

    zakkiel on
    Account not recoverable. So long.
  • QuidQuid Definitely not a banana Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Having experienced Fort Bliss/Camp McGregor, I'm not surprised.

    Quid on
  • werehippywerehippy Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Software analyst getting a electronic health record (EPIC) care into the local medical conglomerate (3 hospitals with another coming up and 20 odd clinics). I ended up getting the job because it was 5 minutes from my house in the sticks and they desperately needed any engineer they could get their hands on.

    Going forward, it depends whether my PhD applications go anywhere or not. If so, I'll be a dirt poor graduate student until sometime into the next decade at which point I'll probably head into an NGO or a teaching/research position. If not, I'll probably sign on with a consulting firm, because trained engineers who know my system are in absurd demand.

    werehippy on
  • cyphrcyphr Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I'm currently a software intern with a local communications company whose bread and butter is handling power outage calls for electric companies. Right now I'm doing Java development, rewriting some apps that visualize information from the billing database and are generally intended to look sexy for potential clients. Aside: we're using the Spring framework for dependency-injection and probably DAO management, and after only a few weeks of using it I'm beginning to wonder why it isn't used for every non-trivial Java application in existence. It's so nice.

    Before that, I worked at Lexmark last summer in another internship. You have no idea how much code is behind that stupid Print dialog box.

    I plan on graduating in June, continuing my internship through the summer until my lease runs out on my apartment, and hopefully by then I'll have a job lined up somewhere other than Ohio. In the long run, my girlfriend and I have toyed with the idea of someday moving overseas. Sweden seems lovely.

    cyphr on
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  • BelketreBelketre Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Suckers!
    As of 2 weeks ago, I'm retired. A man of leisure.
    Now my only job is keeping those damn kids off my lawn.

    Belketre on
  • IreneDAdlerIreneDAdler Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I'm a first-year biology grad student at UCSD. Hopefully I'll get out in another 4.5 to 5 years with my PhD. I have no personal goals for my life or anything. I've known I wanted a PhD ever since I was a little kid. After I get that, I don't really know what I'll do. I might get a post-doctoral scholar position, which is kinda like grad student ++, and most people do it as a step towards a faculty position. I don't know if I really want to become a professor, though. It seems like a lot of responsibility :P

    IreneDAdler on
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  • Professor SnugglesworthProfessor Snugglesworth Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I want to major in criminology, and it's a really really bad idea, should I do it?

    Don't do it. Stick with IT, for the love of god. I left IT to get into crim with these delusions of grandeur and now I'm 25 and I don't even know if I could still get into law school and even if I could I can't afford it.

    If you want law and order, get a degree in history or english lit and go to law school, unless your college has pre-law, and do that instead.

    Otherwise stick with IT.

    Wow. When you're talking about how criminology is a bad choice, is it because you haven't been able to find work for it, or that it's overall a shitty subject to enroll in? Is there a difference between criminology and criminal justice?

    It's funny you bring up english lit, since I've been told several times that I should pursue it due to my writing skills and love of fiction. Problem is it doesn't look like a high paying job. And ultimately I want to make a lot of money whatever I do.

    As for IT, I'm not sure exactly what I could qualify for. I use a PC extensively, I've messed around with my router, windows vista, etc. I installed all my PC parts into my tower recently too. When I was taking those previous classes I held out pretty well until I reached a point that involved calculations and....ugh.

    But I finished over half of those classes, so I want to make use of those credits one way or the other. I'm just not sure what kind of IT program is up my alley.

    Professor Snugglesworth on
  • Evil_ReaverEvil_Reaver Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Currently: I am a "System Analyst II" for the IT department of a private Jewish school / temple in Los Angeles. "System Analyst" equates to being the second lowest ranking person the office, which means that myself and the SA I (who is below me) do all of the bitch work that no one else wants to do.

    I moved to LA in August 2006 because my (then) girlfriend is going to Pepperdine to finish her Masters degree in Public Policy. Having already graduated college and working a dead end job in the cable company's call center, I decided that moving with her would be the best thing for me to do. Upon arriving in LA, I worked at the temple for two weeks under the guise of a "working interview;" meaning that I would work and get paid and my supervisor would observe how I fit in with the rest of the team. I originally applied for the assistant web developer position at the temple's high school campus, but after a real interview with the administration, I decided I didn't want to get a job only to leave it 2 weeks later. Fortunately, my supervisor at the temple kept the System Analyst job open for me just in case I didn't take the web job.

    This job was great for the first year, but I have since become one of those people who hates going to work every day. My immediate IT co-workers are great and my boss is the best supervisor I have had in a long time, but I hate everything else about this place. The clergy are some of the biggest assholes I have ever met and their assistants think they are the proverbial shit because they assist the clergy. Most of the teachers and staff that work here clueless as to what happens in the real world, since all of them come from wealthy families and have never really left the "Beverly Hills Bubble." It also goes without saying that their religious doctrine is shoved in my face on a daily basis because this is a religious organization.

    I'm under-paid (by my boss' own admission), over worked, and under appreciated by the rest of the organization.

    My wife (same girl) is graduating in April and is looking for jobs back in the mid-west and I can't wait to get the hell out of here.

    What I Want To Do: I was *this* close to joining the Marines right after high school. I regret not joining the military, but with the current state of affairs, I'm kind of glad I didn't.

    I graduated with a BA in History in 2005. I'd love to be a history professor, but that would require more schooling, which I can't afford right now.

    I wanted to be a firefighter or forest ranger for a good, I don't know, 10 years of my life, but I don't know why I didn't pursue it. I think it's something I need to look in to at this point in my life.

    Evil_Reaver on
    XBL: Agitated Wombat | 3DS: 2363-7048-2527
  • MikeManMikeMan Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I'm currently employed as a "Research Analyst" for a large market research company. They sent me to London, all expenses paid, for a month-long graduate training program, which was fun as hell but as it turned out, not terribly relevant to what I ended up doing when I got back. What I do, day to day, is arrange data in tables in powerpoint, double check that data against thousands of pages of excel charts, and write headlines for it. The hours sometimes suck (I was in the office until 9 PM last friday, which translates to getting home after midnight with the commute), but the pay is more than I've ever made. As a recent grad, that's not saying much, but let's just say I'm firmly in the entry-level business pay grade, which meets my needs comfortably at the moment.

    There are three offices in my state. One of them is right next to my house. That one is, by a stroke of bad luck, not the one I am working at. No, I commute two hours each way to my other office, in the middle of my state. The commute is the worst part about my job. I hate it; it drains me physically and emotionally. Even fairly good days at work turn into depressing shitfests by the time I get home at 8 pm after waking up at 6 am.

    The good news is that, come april, I will be able to work out of the office in my town, 2 minutes away. The bad news is that day is 12 weeks away.

    I sort of fell into this job; the position was brought to my attention via a family friend and it seemed too good to pass up. I have a BA and majored in history in college. I had no idea what I wanted to do, and, depressingly, still don't.

    I figured I'd jump at this job, and make some money and save up while I figured out what i really want out of life. So far, the second part has seen no progress, and the commute is shitty enough that it's really getting to me.

    But I'm going to stick it out until April. Ah, sweet, blessed April.

    MikeMan on
  • Mullitt The WiseMullitt The Wise Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I'm an audio engineer. I work for my uncle out of his home studio. I just graduated a month and a half ago (I got a certificate), and I haven't been working on much yet, but we have a few projects lined up.
    I plan to be an engineer for the rest of my life. Music is what I love to do.

    Mullitt The Wise on
    balloonssig.jpg
  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Quid wrote: »
    Having experienced Fort Bliss/Camp McGregor, I'm not surprised.

    I say it every time, but Fort Bliss is a helluva lot better than Fort Riley. I hated that cursed place.

    Anyway, I'm a junior now in Electrical Engineering, and don't really work much of a job except over summer. I'm also in the Army National Guard, but in the "fixing radios" capacity rather than the "shooting people" capacity.

    Oddly, I'm looking at going Navy at the moment as well, and I talked to a recruiter for their officer program today that I really wish I had talked to before I re-upped Army Guard. Basically, assuming I make it in (which it seems likely I would/will), they want to pay me active duty pay (midrange enlisted pay) while I finish school, then send me to nuke school (and OCS) to be come a Nuclear Power Officer, or some such. Which is pretty much exactly what I wanted to do. Now I have to see if I can get released from the Guard earlier than I had originally planned (I told them long ago that I would be looking for a release to active duty within a couple years anyway) and get on with my actual planned career. Hopefully before we wind up back in the desert...not because I have any real aversion to going back, but because it would push back my career advancement and put at risk my chances of switching branches (age is an issue).

    Basically, there's a 90% chance that I'll wind up finishing my career in the military, the only real question is which branch and in what capacity.

    mcdermott on
  • MikeManMikeMan Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I'm an audio engineer. I work for my uncle out of his home studio. I just graduated a month and a half ago (I got a certificate), and I haven't been working on much yet, but we have a few projects lined up.
    I plan to be an engineer for the rest of my life. Music is what I love to do.

    Being that that's what I dabble in and I would love to get into that field, can you give me any tips?

    MikeMan on
  • MrMisterMrMister Jesus dying on the cross in pain? Morally better than us. One has to go "all in".Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I'm majoring in Philosophy and graduating in Spring. I just got my rejection notice from the Japanese Exchange Teacher program today, which I had hoped to do as a year off. Life sucks.

    MrMister on
  • ProtoProto Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I do .NET Web/Software development for a health care organization. It's ok for now.

    I'm working towards setting up a custom bicycle building business on the side, so we'll see where that goes.

    Proto on
    and her knees up on the glove compartment
    took out her barrettes and her hair spilled out like rootbeer
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