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[Dogs in the Vineyard] - OOC Thread: shit and the fan it hits

"Be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap."

- - -

"We went west. We went through massive canyons, dryer than they were deep. We roughed mountains, so high they held the angels. We knew fields so long they must've surely circled the Earth their length over. We saw oceans and sinkpits, we drank from His pools, and we felt their cool refrain on our faces. We walked until our horses gave out, and our feet went ragged, and we knew, yet, we were not but a fraction of the road to be traveled, a bead of sweat towards the work that had to be done."

- - -

"You got two choices, boy - I'm'll count to three, and you either got that gun on the ground and you're prayin' to the King I don't blow yer head off right here, or you still standin' on the shoulders of demons. Either way, that thing's still pointed at me in three seconds, I'm gonna get real ornery, boy, REAL ornery. Look me in the eyes - God's will is in these eyes. You know it, Praise Be.

Don't make me waste a bullet.

One.

I'm countin', boy.

Two."


- - -

DOGS IN THE VINEYARD

dogs.jpg

Dogs in the Vineyard is about God’s Watchdogs, young men and women called to preserve the Faithful in a hostile frontier territory. They travel from town to isolated town, carrying mail, news, and doctrine, healing the sick, supporting the weary, and pronouncing judgment upon the wicked. Sharpshooters, Cowboy-Priests, and Holy Horsemen alike - a town welcomes you with celebration and honor, but what you’re there to do is stir up its dirt and lay bare its sins.

The setting is a fantasy inspired by pre-statehood Utah, the Deseret Territory, toward the middle of the 19th century. Picture a landscape of high mountains, icy rivers and cedar woods, falling away westward into scrublands, deserts, buttes and swells. The summer skies are heartbreaking blue, but the winters are long and killing. "Mountain Men", ancestors of those who properly own this land before it was ravaged from them, maintain an uneasy truce with the frontiers in some places, and outright wage war with them in others,

Picture religious pioneers, fleeing persecution and violence in the East. They’re trying to establish a society based on faith and righteousness out in this frontier. They’ve made the long trek westward but they’re still in danger: their towns are small and isolated, vulnerable to attack from without, sin and corruption within. Under pressure, their pride becomes sin, their anger becomes violence, their resentments become hate. Winter and the demons howl...

You are God’s Watchdogs, holding the Faith together.
- - -

"Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversaries are demons, as roaring lions they walketh about, seeking whom they may devour."
- - -

Cornelius patrolled, shotgun slung over his shoulder, coat rusting about his ankles but not once touching the dust road. He had but two more days before he was due out, after the marriage he was asked to bless. All the mail had been sorted, and his belongings were packed into the small rucksack he kept tied to Bessie's saddle.

He heard footsteps, then, and from the corner of his eye, he saw it - a tall, dark man, standing idle, under hat and coat, no weapon at his side. None that could be seen, anyway.

The Dog kept walking, wiggling his fingers along the hold of his gun. His eyes locked straight ahead to where he planned to call rest before checking the far end of town. He was steel, full and focused.

From his left came a sound: a sort of low, crackling growl, and a hiss, and the tall man who was there was not upright and imposing, but instead hunched over, wringing his hands together... except his hands were dark red, bruised and scratched, long, broken claws jutting from the tips. His face had become a snout, his eyes dark as the night air around him. The demon's long coat ripped open at the back, revealing a ridged, humped spine full of quills.

It ran straight for Cornelius, yet he did not blink - he hadn't the time to, his body whipping around to face thing, firing before he had even come to a stop. The evil beast went flying against the wall of the saloon, ragged holes ripped out of him from the blast.

Yet still it rose back, growling and drooling, and behind Cornelius, he heard the scampering of many a like beast, cackling and whispering. He didn't know how many rounds he had left on him.


- - -

Old_Cross.jpg

Each session is a single town, where the Dogs arrive to deliver mail, perform ceremony, preach wisdom, and, most importantly, deal with any problems that may arise. The Watchdogs have unspoken authority to drag sinners out into the street and shoot them, convert them to the Faith, or try to ease them of their hardships (even if their authority is sometimes challenged by non-believers, or the local Law who doesn't want any trouble in his town).

The Dogs must deal with the sin, they must lay Judgement, but how they do that is up to them: do they preach and speak wisdom? Are they diplomatic? Are they fair? Or will all sins meet the same fate at the end of a gun?

The ethics and moral problems of how to deal with each case are what makes Dogs in the Vineyard so fun to watch. One Dog is out for blood, the other seeks to find a more peaceful solution: how will things resolve?
- - -

"To the law and to the testimony: if they speak not according to this word, it is because there is no light in them."

- - -

THE FAITH
The whole name of the Faith is the Faith of All Things in the King of Life, Reborn.
The whole name of the Dogs is the Order Set Apart to the Preservation of Faith and the Faithful. Casually, the King’s Dogs or Life’s Watchdogs. Dogs are always called Brother or Sister by their first name: Brother Jeremiah, Sister Patience.
The Faith is the only true religion in the world. All other religions are a) actively demonic, cults created by Faithful leaders fallen into sin; b) corrupt and decadent, like the majority religions of the East; or c) idle nonsense, like most of the religions in the wider world.

TERRITORIAL AUTHORITY
Representatives of the Territorial Authority will generally be either a claims officer or other bureaucrat, or a circuit rider not unlike you Dogs. Only larger towns will have any sort of Territorial law enforcement — a sheriff — but he’s most likely to be Faithful, elected to the job by his congregation. The Territorial Authority’s real concern is that taxes are paid and nobody interferes with the mail — it worries about “keeping the peace” only insofar as lawlessness interferes with taxes and mail.
It’s worth pointing out that the Dogs are authorized by the Faith to do some things — like shoot sinners in the street — that are against the law. Exercise your authority cautiously.
- - -

We need three players - we've got one in reserve, whose ready, but she may not be able to play. So even if we fill up and you want to play, Reserve a spot and we'll let you in if we can. Sign up in something colorful, and the next post shows how to make a character, so you can go ahead and do that, if you'd like!

You don't need the rulebook: The requisite rules are below.

FAITHFUL WATCHDOGS UNTO THE SERVICE (if the King of Life hath wronged thy gender, sendeth unto him a notice that thou art pissed)
1. Brother Shinyo
Brother Jacob Robertson

Strong History
(13d6 in Stat dice, 3d6 4d8 3d10 in Trait dice, 1d4 3d6 2d8 in Relationship dice)

Stats:
Acuity 2d6
Body 4d6
Heart 2d6
Will 5d6

Traits:
1d6 - My family wanted this for me; I do it not for them, but for the Lord my Master.
2d6 - I'm a decent shot
1d8 - My faith is unshakable
1d8 - My face just looks scary in order to frighten evil
2d8 - I'm good at fist fighting should it come to that
1d10 - I'm terrifying with a knife
1d10 - I love children
1d10 - I'm a dog

Relationships:
2d6 Father Daniels
1d8 God

Possessions:
1d6 Coat - It looks professional and cleanly made, but it has few colors and is somewhat uncomfortable to wear. This coat has no compassion sewn into it, only expectations. There's a large Sign of the Tree pattern stitched onto the back, and another of a dog onto the right breast pocket. This could easily be a much nicer coat with a bit of elbow grease.
2d4 Six Shooter - The barrel needs to be cleaned, the sights realigned, and the trigger is a little sticky.
2d8 Hunting Knife - Well made, well polished. Serrated edges halfway down, and a fitted grip.
1d6 Book of Life - Standard Print version from the Temple of Life with a couple circled passages.
1d6 Jar of Consecrated Earth - Woops, how'd that worm get in there?
1d6 Horse - His age is starting to show, but he's no where near done yet.

My Accomplishment:
"I hope that this miserable creature can now be a good enough dog for the Lord."

2. Brother Kay
Brother Caleb Dunn - Well-Rounded History

Statistics - 17d6
Acuity - 5
Body - 3
Heart - 6
Will - 3

Traits - 1d4, 4d6, 2d8
Boyish Good Lucks - 1d4 - Being a pretty boy can get you in trouble, as well as help out.
When I speak, people listen - 2d8 - Caleb is an excellent public speaker and negotiator.
Horsemanship - 1d6
I'm a Dog - 1d6
I never miss a tin can - 1d6 - Caleb is a good shot, in theory. He's never shot at a real target before.
Quick and Quiet - 1d6 - Caleb knows when it's best to stay quiet, and even be a little sneaky.
I done made daddy proud o' me - 1d6

Relationships - 4d6, 2d8
Charity Dunn (Mother) - 2d6
Abigail Allen (Schoolmistress) - 1d8

Possessions
Caleb's coat is exceptionally well-made, all the womenfolk in his family put their love and respect into the garment, embroidering bright patterns in red, yellow and gold with care and skill. On the left breast, there is a glorious sun, rays of orange and yellow illuminating a stylised furrowed field. The remainder of the coat has rows of geometric patterns, zig-zags, stripes and waves. The colours are warm and vibrant - reds, yellows, oranges and earth tones. There is but one 'flaw', a simple black cross at the collar - his father's stitch. 2d8
A Colt revolver - 1d6 1d4
A stationary set - 1d6
Tempest (his horse) - 1d6
Jar of Consecrated Earth - 1d6
Book of Life - 1d6
A worn photo of his family - 1d4

My Accomplishment
"I hope this makes daddy proud of me."

3. Brother Neaden
Status
6 Acuity
4 Heart
3 Body
2 Will
Traits:
I know the Book of Life like the back of my Hand. 2d10
I can shoot a varmint 1d6
I'm a Dog now 1d6
I've seen a Demon 2d4
I love animals 2d4

Relationships:
Steward Ryder 2 d8
My Mule Patrick 1 d6

Possessions:
Coat. Eleazar's coat is as unremarkable as the rest of him visually. It is not that the colors are especially drab or that the stitching is badly done. It is just neither good nor bad. 2d6
Book of life. Eleazar carries a battered Book of Life on him at all times though the Steward used to joke that he did not need it as he had most of it in his head. 2d6
Old Knife. The knife that was found next to Eleazar when the faithful saved him. 1d4
Patrick My Mule. Patrick the Mule was the Stewards gift to Eleazar when he left his town. Eleazar raised him from a foal and frequently spent his time not working brushing or riding him. 2d6
Hunting Rifle. 1d6 1d4

My Accomplishment. "I hope that fear of my past will not run my life forever."

Some Helpful Things
Antique Guns
Appropriate clothing for the era (and again)
Fiery Words for a Dog to say, from the Book of Life

robotsunshine on
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Posts

  • edited March 2009
    CHARACTERS

    You play one of God's Watchdogs, called to service in the Faith. You travel between isolated congregations called "Branches" and hold the Faith together. You have a long coat - colorful, beautiful, hand-pieced and quilted by your friends and family back home. It is your badge, a powerful symbol of your authority. You represent Judgment and Mercy on behalf of God, whom we call The King of Life.

    Starting characters can be male or female, but are between 18-23. They've had two months or so in training, education, and ceremony to prepare, and they know one another. They are unmarried virgins, trusted to travel in mixed company.

    When your character arrives at a Branch and finds a problem, he or she can take whatever steps are necessary, and non one can justly complain. Your character acts on behalf of the King of Life - if anyone has a problem, they can take it up with Him.

    Does this mean you can't sin? No. But you're the only one allowed to judge your character's actions. Your conscience is in your own hands - are you a remorseless monster, or a destroying angel? The game can't tell the difference.

    STEP ONE: What's your background?
    - Well-Rounded: Your character is straightforward, balanced, and effective, a good choice for men born into the Faith.
    17d6 in Stat dice, 1d4 4d6 2d8 in Trait dice, 4d6 2d8 in Relationship dice

    - Strong History: Your character has a good education, lots of experience, or specialized training.
    13d6 in Stat dice, 3d6 4d8 3d10 in Trait dice, 1d4 3d6 2d8 in Relationship dice

    - Complicated History: Your character had a troubled, dangerous, or challenging upbringing. It's a good choice for those converted into the Faith.
    15d6 in Stat dice, 4d4 2d6 2d10 in Trait dice, 5d6 2d8 in Relationship dice

    - Strong Community: Your character is socially adept, and from a strong, caring family. It's a good choice for women born into the Faith.
    13d6 in Stat dice, 1d4 3d6 2d8 in Trait dice, 4d4 4d8 3d10 in Relationship dice

    - Complicated Community: Your character is socially vulnerable, or from a broken or destructive family.
    15d6 in Stat dice, 6d6 2d8 in Trait dice, 4d4 2d6 2d8 2d10 in Relationship dice

    STEP TWO: Place your stats
    Divvy up those Stat dice between your stats (don't roll them!). If you had, say 10d6 in Stat dice, you could put 2d6 in one Stat, 3d6 in another, another 3d10 in a third Stat, and the last 2d6 in another.

    The minimum for each stat is 2d6, with no maximum.

    ACUITY - You are perceptive, alert, educated, clever, savvy, or well-read.
    BODY - You are big, healthy, strong, wiry, muscular, tall, graceful, quick, or steady.
    HEART - You are compassionate, attractive, charming, gentle, courageous, enduring, faithful, or likable.
    WILL - You are tenacious, aggressive, confident, unflinching, strong-willed, or unshakable.

    STEP THREE - Traits!
    You get to make these up. Whatever you think would be relevant or interesting to your line of work: Horsemanship is a good one, and so is Preaching and Biblical Lore. But you can also word them to be little tidbits of history, like, "My mama used to read to me from the Book of Life every night before bed" could be a Trait. Or it could be facts about yourself - "I taught myself how to shoot a gun".

    Either way, give yourself some and assign your Trait dice to them. You can double up dice as much as you want, but only one type of die per Trait (you can have Horsemansip 1d6 or 7d6, but you can't have Horsemanship 1d6 1d10 or anything like that). If you need some Trait inspiration, write "I'm a good shot" as your first Trait, and then use that to branch out - where did you learn to shoot? From whom? Why did you learn to shoot? etc.

    When assigning dice, don't match die size to Traits by competence (higher die sizes are better), but by how important or interesting that Trait is to your character. "I can shoot a can from a mile away 1d4" versus "I'm not sure about my line of work, and I doubt myself 3d10" means that the latter is a lot more important to you, and factors in prominently to how things will unfold.

    d4 - such Traits make it more likely you'll suffer consequences in conflicts. Take them as disadvantages, but also as complications: "I'm a good shot 1d4" means that you can shoot, but when the guns come out, your life gets more complicated.

    THE RULE - You HAVE to either take "I'm a Dog" as a Trait, or in the next step, take a Relationship with the Dogs. Your choice.

    STEP FOUR - Relationships
    Name a couple of people your character has some sort of relationship with and assign them dice (following Trait dice rules above). Don't make many, save the dice for later on in play, when you can make new Relationships on the fly.

    Blood - when you meet kin, you get then as a Relationship for fre at 1d6. You can spend dice if you want to change that.

    STEP FIVE - Belongings
    Name some things you carry with you. If you decide they need dice, give them to them (as in, do you imagine they'll come up in a relevant way in conflict with other characters? Weapons will, and so may bibles. Use your judgement, but don't worry - you can improvise their dice on the fly if you need to). There's no limit, just what you could reasonably carry with you. We won't get picky.

    Dogs might carry books, stationary and pens, a water flask, or other things. They definitely carry their coat, a gun, the Book of Life, a horse, and a jar of consecrated earth,

    Giving them dice - give them the appropriate dice if normal.

    Normal thing - 1d6
    Excellent things - 2d6
    Big things - 1d8
    Excellent and big - 2d8
    Crap things - 1d4

    A good knife 2d8
    Old boots 1d6
    An old, bad revolver 2d4 (1d4 for being crap, +1d4 for being a gun)
    Massive shotgun 1d8 1d4

    If the thing is a gun, it gets an additional 1d4 no mater what it is.

    Your coat - give this dice, and write down what patterns and colors it has. Most coats start at 2d6, being excellent. Feel free to change that though.

    SIXTH AND FINAL STEP - Your accomplishment
    Say something that you have your character accomplished duirng initition into being a Watchdog. (Maybe it's, "I hope I earned the respect of my peers," or, "I hope I learned to solve conflicts without violence," or, "I hope I shook my fear of all things demonic and corrupt." Don't pick something that'll break your character if it goes sour.)

    Next, you and the GM (hey, me!) will have a mini-conflict, which will perfectly explain the dice rolling rules of the game to you (if you can tell if one number is higher than another, you can do this). At the end of it, we'll discover how your accomplishment went, and you'll get a new d6 Trait for it, even if it went bad.

    HELPFUL RESOURCES
    Your name is going to be Brother or Sister something. Here's some great names, just for Dogs in the Vineyard: http://www.bullypulpitgames.com/projects/names/milk_and_honey2.pdf

    BACKGROUND
    By the time you're 12 or 13, your Branch Steward is possibly considering you to be a Dog. The Steward guides and watches you up until about age 17. At 18-20, the Steward interviews you and asks you to be a Dog. You say your goodbyes, pack, and head East to the Dogs' temple in Bridal Falls City. You train for two months, along with about 15 others, depending on the spiritual haul.

    Your teachers' goal isn't to make you a Dog - that's your job. They are there to:
    - prove or cull you
    - train you
    - educate you
    - initiate you
    - inspire you,
    and what you do with that is up to you.

    Meanwhile, at home, your family and town are busy making your coat. Everyone comes to ceremoniously give a stitch. The condition and beauty of your coat reflects those back home. Afterwards, it is blessed with consecrated earth and a laying-on of hands. Towards the end of your training regimen, you receive mail from home, and it's your coat, along with letters and notes.

    You serve as a Dog for about three or four years. Your coat gets damaged, and the communities you serve will repair it or replace it out of respect. This is a typical case, and your Dog's mileage may vary.

    Next, you get a route and companions. You return to the Temple about twice annually.

    Your duties:
    - deliver mail and news
    - participate in local ceremony or office
    - deliver doctrine or interpretation to the Branch and its Steward
    - preach
    - participate in (but hold yourself away from) social functions and celebrations
    - help out with physical work

    It goes without saying that Dogs don't drink (booze, coffee, or black tea - instead, they go for herbal tea or soft drinks), and only old people smoke anyways.

    robotsunshine on
  • edited March 2009
    Here's how the rules work: Say yes or roll the dice. Repeat that to yourself every second of every scene. Look at what's happening - the cobbler's wife seems unhappy. Say yes, or roll the dice. She's ducking out of service, saying she feels ill. Say yes, or roll the dice. She's been doing this for weeks now.

    Say yes (I agree, that is acceptable, it makes sense) or roll the dice (oh-no-you-fucking-don't, I don't want the scene to go this way, it would be better if someone intervened)

    You constantly want to move towards the next conflict (conflict, here, means when we roll dice to see what happens). See, here, you don't roll the way you do in say, D&D or White Wolf. If you want to do something, then you do it. Do you see the ambush before it happens? Depends - is it dramatically appropriate? Does the rest of the group care? Say yes or roll the dice. You have the option to interrupt anything, even what the GM says, and force it into a fight. So look for the next possible conflict. Be aggressive! You don't have to roll to see if you can pick a lock, or things like that. It's on a grander scale. Let's look at how to do a conflict, first, and this will make more sense.

    There's a problem. Someone didn't say Yes. The GM decided to pick on you. Something's wrong.
    1. Establish what's at stake, anyone can suggest this. The stakes are what the conflict is about, what we're fighting over, what's so important.
      - What's at stake is, does your brother shoot the woman?
    2. Set the stage. Fancy up the scene and get everyone in the mood.
      - Dust swirls around our feet, only to spiral down the road behind me. I've got my finger on the trigger and I'm shaking my head. It's unbearably hot, everyone's sweating. By now, school's out, and the kids nearby are wise that something's up - they're crowding around. The woman's crying, and my brother's pointing his gun straight at her.
    3. Who's participating in this conflict?
    4. Take up dice depending on how you want to enter the conflict (these are called Arenas):
      - We're just talking (Acuity + Heart)
      - Things are getting physical, but we're not fighting (Body + Heart)
      - Fist-fights (Body + Will)
      - We pulled out the guns (Acuity + Will)

      You can roll your Relationship dice if the Relation is what's at stake or is your opponent.
    5. Everyone rolls their dice for all to see.
    6. Take turns Raising and Seeing.
      To Raise, say what your character does and put two dice forward. Do something your opponent can't ignore.
      - (dice: 5, 6) I stare him down, not even flinching when he shifts the gun to me. I act like I hadn't even noticed. "Jed. Stop this. You ain't got it in ya, and there ain't no reason for all this. Put it away. I don't wanna have to put my hands on you, but I will if I gotta."

      To See, put forward any amount of dice that equals or exceeds the standing Raise (less dice is better). So, the current Raise is 5 and 6 (above), with is 5 + 6 = 11. So you need to put forward some of your dice that equals or betters 11.
      - (4, 3, 3, 2) I see he's not kidding. And, honestly? I don't have it in me. I can't shoot my brother. I couldn't shoot this woman... I won't say it out loud, but I'm afraid. My gun lowers to my side, and I take a few steps back, not wanting to get tackled right off. "Alright, Samuel. Alright. We gotta talk, though, okay...?" I'm almost in tears. "She done me wrong, brother..."
      • When you See, if you can do it with one die, that's Reversing The Blow. You turn the Raise back on your attacker somehow (he swings, but you grab his fist and squeeze, forcing him down; he tells you the King of Life has a place for him, and you remind him how the Steward said Heaven had no place for a sinner such as he). Keep your See die - you get to (and have to) use it for your next Raise!
      • If you See with two dice, that's a Block or a Dodge. Say how you defend against the attack.
      • If you See with three or more dice, that's Taking The Blow. Say how the blow lands and how your charater reacts. You also get Fallout Dice, which will later on change and affect your character, possibly for the worse. You take a number of dice equal to how many you used to See, and set them aside - if the blow wasn't physical, those dice are d4s. If they were physical, then they're d6s. If a weapon was used against you, it's a d8, and if it was a bullet, it's a d10.
      • If you don't want to See, you can Give. This is a pretty standard action, don't be afraid to do it. You lose the Stakes and the conflict, but you get bonus dice for a follow-up conflict! You do NOT Take the Blow or anything, you basically get out of the conflict free, and you don't win it. Take your single highest die and keep it for a follow-up conflict. A follow-up conflict's stakes follow directly from the previous conflict's resolution. You can actually try the exact same Stakes again, but to do so, the number of participants, the location, and the opening arena (Just Talking, Fist-Fighting, etc.) must be different, all three.

    Follow-up conflicts and Giving are important parts, and we will all be pushing towards them. Fight with all your heart, but don't be afraid if you need to Give.

    That's the structure:
    - Stakes?
    - Stage?
    - Who's involved?
    - Roll dice
    - I Raise, you See.
    - You Raise, I See,
    - etc., until someone doesn't have the dice to See

    Also, if more than people need to See a given Raise, that's acceptable. Their Sees are different and exclusive, though - they don't add their dice to beat yours. They beat you separately. And yes, you will sometimes be Raising and Seeing against each other as players!


    ESCALATING
    That's all well and good. Let's say we're Just Talking, and I'm about to run out of dice. What I can do is Escalate, and move out of Just Talking into, let's say, Fist-Fighting (the arenas are Just Talking, Physical but not fighting, Fist-Fighting, and Guns). I get to roll my Stats for Fist-Fighting and add those dice to my already standing dice, and of course, the conflict's taken a turn, where we're not just talking, we're actually fighting.

    You can only roll a Stat once per conflict, so if an escalation calls for you to roll Acuity + Heart, and you've already rolled Heart, just roll Acuity.

    TRAITS AND THINGS
    When you use one of your Traits as a Raise or See, you get to to roll its dice. Same for a Belonging. You can only roll a Trait / Belonging once per conflict. You can keep using in the conflict as much as you want, you just don't get the dice for it.

    You roll their dice before putting them forward, and you don't have to use them if you don't like them. You can even use them for a separate See or Raise.

    CEREMONY
    You can do neat spiritual things, like Call someone by their True Name (said to summon demon's attention and obedience), Sing Praise, Recite from the Book of Life, or Make the Sign of the Tree (right hand, palm out, shoulder level, fingers wide spread) as part of a Raise or See, especially against demons. It looks badass.

    FALLOUT
    Nasty stuff!
    - Roll all your Fallout dice after conflict. Add the two highest together.
    - You'll be presented with a list of Fallout Consequences according to the sum, and you get to pick something to add to your character. Less than 8 is pretty safe, with only short-term damage. More than 8 is lasting harm, bad stuff, and more than 12 is injured. 20 or higher, and your character is dead.
    - Fallout will be dealt with as it happens, since it's not immediately relevant. Just know that it's bad.

    robotsunshine on
  • delrolanddelroland Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Didn't we already have a thread on this once?

    Also, I heard that instead of grit you get multiple wives.
    :P

    delroland on
    EVE: Online - the most fun you will ever have not playing a game.
    "Go up, thou bald head." -2 Kings 2:23
  • edited March 2009
    delroland wrote: »
    Didn't we already have a thread on this once?

    Also, I heard that instead of grit you get multiple wives.
    :P

    It didn't go anywhere. So here it is, only better.

    robotsunshine on
  • Kay2Kay2 Registered User
    edited March 2009
    This looks and sounds absolutely awesome, though I'm a touch intimidated by the apparent complexity. When it comes to new rulesets I'm not familiar with, I'm terrified of 'doing it wrong'.

    Is this going to be 100% play by post, or are there going to be scheduled IRC/Skype/etc meetings to play? Being on GMT, I wouldn't want to hold anyone up if you required realtime interactions in the middle of my nights.

    Kay2 on
  • ShinyoShinyo Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Sounds awesome, I'm in. Sign Up

    Shinyo on
  • edited March 2009
    Kay wrote: »
    This looks and sounds absolutely awesome, though I'm a touch intimidated by the apparent complexity. When it comes to new rulesets I'm not familiar with, I'm terrified of 'doing it wrong'.

    Is this going to be 100% play by post, or are there going to be scheduled IRC/Skype/etc meetings to play? Being on GMT, I wouldn't want to hold anyone up if you required realtime interactions in the middle of my nights.

    I'm really up for either, but I planned on it being 100% play by post. If a chat-type thing comes up and we can do that, cool beans - if not, no big deal, and we'll stay here.

    Also, the rules are very forgiving. Part of making a character is going into them, baby-steps, and when you're done you'll be more confident. It only LOOKS complex because of your options, but the core of it is very simple: I put forward some dice, you equal or beat them, and then YOU put forward some dice, and we keep on going back and forth. There's only one mechanic you ever use, and that's rolling dice for conflict. Here's a clear, concise guide to it, in the spoiler. Just a transcript.
    The players are A, B, and C.

    An NPC does something that A doesn't like, and B is ready to back up his fellow player in resolving the matter. C, however, thinks what the NPC is doing is the right course of action! So we go to conflict.
    • 1. The Stakes

      The Stakes need to be small. You shouldn't say, "Our stakes are, do we find out the truth that the NPC is hiding from us?" That's too grand, too make-or-break. You want smaller stakes that breed follow-up conflicts. Instead, good stakes for that situation would be, "Do we get the NPC to believe we're on his side?" And then you keep going over time, more and more conflicts, until you get that truth. Honestly, setting proper Stakes is going to be the hardest part. But don't worry - it's my duty as GM to say, "Those are too big. Why not this, instead?" Don't take it as me trying to rob you of your ideas ro railroad you - you chose the Stakes, I'm just trying to help put them in scale.

      A: "The Stakes are, Do we let him skirt his duty in town, since this 'Need to pray more' is obviously a bunch of crap?"
      GM: "That's a little much - how about, instead, the Stakes are, do you prove your authority to the NPC? Then you can grill him about his duties and needs after that."
      A: "Sounds good."

      The Stakes are: Do we prove our authority to NPC?
    • 2. Set the Stage.

      B: "I'll do it. It's mid-morning, and a cool breeze is mercifully present, helping all those out slaving in the fields to get this harvest in before the celebration. Everywhere, there's a crowd - the streets are alive, everyone cooperating, everyone lending a hand: except for NPC. He strolls towards the empty church, hands in pockets, his cart left by the wayside. The dust starts to kick up, and we are ignored amidst a sea of responsibility."
    • 3. Who's participating in this conflict?

      GM: "A and B, and NPC."
      C: "I'm going to come in, also. I want to be the voice of dissent here, just to stir things up."
      GM: "Cool."
    • 4-5. Take up dice depending on the conflict's opening arena, and roll.

      We're all just talking, so we all roll Acuity + Heart, for now.

      A: 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 4, 5, 5, 6
      B: 2, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5, 5
      C: 1, 2, 2, 3, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6
      NPC: 1, 2, 2, 4, 4, 5, 6, 6
    • 6. Raise and See

      Usually it's obvious who goes first, but if it's ever in question, add your two highest dice together to make an initiative, then keep going to your next highest die to break ties.

      - A: "I'll go. Here's my raise: I call out after NPC as he's strolling, clearly a bit agitated, 'Say, son, don't you got some boards need be mendin'? How 'bout you come on back here and get the stuff you just left lyin' 'round?'" (dice: 4, 5) Now, I also name who has to See my Raise, and that's NPC - and C, you said you were cool with what he was doing, so you need to See as well.

      - NPC: "The total raise is 4+5=9, so I'll reply in kind. With two dice, that's a Dodge. "He stops and turns his head, calling back, 'Maybe a little later. Got some business with a higher power." (dice: 4, 5)
      - C: "I'll also Dodge, since I want to save my 6's. 'Let the man be. You can't always know when the Good King's gonna call ya. I'd go with 'im myself, and I just may.'" (dice: 6, 3)
      - - -
      - C: "My turn, next (ED: after whoever goes first, you go in order of Best Roll initiative). My Raise: "He walks past the other two Dogs, turning in front of them, his dusty, faded coat swirling in the wind - an impressive and familiar sight. 'Listen, Brothers - we got plenty o' people workin' out here, don't we? Things ain't gonna break if this young man ain't around. I'm gonna go pray with him myself, and you should too. You can always make time for the King of Life.' (dice: 6, 6) Just A and B have to See."

      - A: "I'll have to use 3 dice for this, so I'm Taking the Blow, I guess. 'I stop and give a rough sigh, looking past to NPC, seeing a little of myself in him during initiation. Funny how these things come up... 'I guess he's right, isn't it? Gotta make time for God.' (dice: 6, 5, 1)"
      - B: "Fuck that, I'm rolling for my 'Biblical Knowledge' Trait, which is 2d8. (rolled: 3 and a 7.) I'll use that 7 and a 5 (dice: 7, 5) for a Dodge. 'You done lost yer head, man? That ain't how we worship! What's the main tenet of Verse 17, Song 3? Or weren't you listening that day in class? "Let us not refuse our work, our need; it is to us as Praise is to Him."'.
    - - -

    At any time, somebody could Escalate: somebody get shoved or grabbed; a punch gets thrown; a gun gets whipped out. It gets you more dice, but things get more dangerous - somebody's going to lose, and there's as good a chance it'll be you as anyone else. The more you escalate, the worse your Fallout gets, and the bigger chance you'll come out bleedin' and dyin'.

    At any time, someone can roll one of their Traits or Belongings: "I can stare a man down," or "I won't lose an argument", or "I can't let an innocent strat from the Path." Or maybe, your "Book of Life," or your "Coat," to show off that you know more than NPC here does about worshiping the King, or even a big branch from off the ground ("I said you's GOIN' to work!...").

    At any time, someone can Give: "This isn't going well for me. I really can't risk the Fallout. I'll Give." or, "I'm not going to win this one, am I? That's fine, I'm gonna go get some people from the farm to back me up for a follow-up conflict, and we'll see what you have to say then! " or maybe even, "I want you to win this one. But see this 9 I rolled? I'm Giving, so I keep that for the next conflict, and that's what I want to win."

    Player 1: Raise
    - Player 2: See
    - Player 3: See

    Player 2: Raise
    - Player 3: See

    Player 3: Raise
    - Player 1: See
    - Player 2: See

    ...adding in extra dice whenever you care to risk it.


    ALSO! Our reserve player has indeed dropped, so we need three players (minus those who have signed up). Kay, I'll assume your interest is piqued and put you down for a "maybe", and if you change your mind let me know.

    robotsunshine on
  • ShinyoShinyo Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Couple questions:
    Before a person goes to have dog training, they still live and work in their home town? Or in a church or something? Should Relationships starting out generally be people from there? Or would they more likely be from somewhere else (like the temple in Bridal Falls?)

    What would a coat be like if a person had a bad relationship with their family? Few colors/patterns and poorly made I assume? What, if any, are the ramifications of that?

    Shinyo on
  • edited March 2009
    Shinyo wrote: »
    Couple questions:
    Before a person goes to have dog training, they still live and work in their home town? Or in a church or something? Should Relationships starting out generally be people from there? Or would they more likely be from somewhere else (like the temple in Bridal Falls?)

    What would a coat be like if a person had a bad relationship with their family? Few colors/patterns and poorly made I assume? What, if any, are the ramifications of that?


    From young adulthood until just before senior age, you work. That is just the way of life - for everyone. It is a sin against the Faith to not pull your own weight and not work to help the community. Dogs live in town and work just like everyone else, but they have something about them that makes the Steward of their Branch say, "He would make a good Watchdog." Maybe particularly pious, maybe good with a gun, maybe very responsible, whatever. They live in any ol' town, and then the Steward sends them to the Temple at Bridal Falls.

    Starting Relationships will probably only come into question ever as Stakes, and yeah, they'd be either from the Temple or from back home. I've personally only ever seen people pick family who they can summon up in a conflict in regards to the stakes (like, Did what my father teach me really matter?)

    A bad relationship with the family would be the Complicated History option, usually. It would indeed be poorly made, and the poor craftsmanship would reflect on the people back home. People can sort of tell who's from a broken family that way, like seeing the kid at school with strange bruises and un-washed clothes. It's likely not to be excellent, and just normal (or maybe big, or even 1d4-crap!), as far as Belongings dice go, but the majority of it is fluff - a big thing could be a new town repairing it and prettying it up for you, to symbolize a new, better family. Onlookers can tell the difference between a coat that's seen battle and was once beautiful, and just a piece of crap, and you might lose respect, with favor towards other Dogs present. At the Temple, you probably got your feelings hurt about it, as the instructors like to test your mettle about such things, and it will most likely be a constant sore spot for your character.

    robotsunshine on
  • ShinyoShinyo Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Thanks, that helps.

    Also, would it be redundant or weird to put 'God' down as a relationship?

    Shinyo on
  • edited March 2009
    Shinyo wrote: »
    Thanks, that helps.

    Also, would it be redundant or weird to put 'God' down as a relationship?

    No, actually. Though it'd be more versatile to make it a trait, like, "I have strong Faith" or something. You could use it more often and accentuate that relationship more. Just opinion, though - it wouldn't be weird or redundant at all as a Relationship.

    robotsunshine on
  • ShinyoShinyo Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    How's this look then?
    Brother Jacob Robertson

    Strong History
    (13d6 in Stat dice, 3d6 4d8 3d10 in Trait dice, 1d4 3d6 2d8 in Relationship dice)

    Stats:
    Acuity 2d6
    Body 4d6
    Heart 2d6
    Will 5d6

    Traits:
    1d6 - My family wanted this for me; I do it not for them, but for the Lord my Master.
    2d6 - I'm a decent shot
    1d8 - My faith is unshakable
    1d8 - My face just looks scary in order to frighten evil
    2d8 - I'm good at fist fighting should it come to that
    1d10 - I'm terrifying with a knife
    1d10 - I love children
    1d10 - I'm a dog

    Relationships:
    2d6 Father Daniels
    1d8 God

    Possessions:
    1d6 Coat - It looks professional and cleanly made, but it has few colors and is somewhat uncomfortable to wear. This coat has no compassion sewn into it, only expectations. There's a large Sign of the Tree pattern stitched onto the back, and another of a dog onto the right breast pocket. This could easily be a much nicer coat with a bit of elbow grease.
    2d4 Six Shooter - The barrel needs to be cleaned, the sights realigned, and the trigger is a little sticky.
    2d8 Hunting Knife - Well made, well polished. Serrated edges halfway down, and a fitted grip.
    1d6 Book of Life - Standard Print version from the Temple of Life with a couple circled passages.
    1d6 Jar of Consecrated Earth - Woops, how'd that worm get in there?
    1d6 Horse - His age is starting to show, but he's no where near done yet.

    My Accomplishment:
    "I hope that this miserable creature can now be a good enough dog for the Lord."

    I'm thinking this character didn't really have that poor of a relationship with his family. They kind of forced him towards the path of being a dog against his will, but the more he did it, the more purpose he found in it and the more he liked it. Though he's still resentful at the feeling that they didn't want it for his own good.

    I also wanted to play up the 'dog' thing a bit in both his purpose and appearance. So he looks a bit ugly and really scruffy, which would be kinda disconcerting to people at first. A shave and a wash would probably do him a world of good, but he wants to look like he's scary and on the edge.

    Shinyo on
  • edited March 2009
    Shinyo wrote: »
    How's this look then?
    Brother Jacob Robertson

    Strong History
    (13d6 in Stat dice, 3d6 4d8 3d10 in Trait dice, 1d4 3d6 2d8 in Relationship dice)

    Stats:
    Acuity 3d6
    Body 6d6
    Heart 4d6
    Will 8d6

    Traits:
    1d6 - My family wanted this for me; I do it not for them, but for the Lord my Master.
    2d6 - I'm a decent shot
    1d8 - My faith is unshakable
    1d8 - My face just looks scary in order to frighten evil
    2d8 - I'm good at fist fighting should it come to that
    1d10 - I'm terrifying with a knife
    1d10 - I love children
    1d10 - I'm a dog

    Relationships:
    2d6 Father Daniels
    1d8 God

    Possessions:
    1d6 Coat - It looks professional and cleanly made, but it has few colors and is somewhat uncomfortable to wear. This coat has no compassion sewn into it, only expectations. There's a large Sign of the Tree pattern stitched onto the back, and another of a dog onto the right breast pocket. This could easily be a much nicer coat with a bit of elbow grease.
    2d4 Six Shooter - The barrel needs to be cleaned, the sights realigned, and the trigger is a little sticky.
    2d8 Hunting Knife - Well made, well polished. Serrated edges halfway down, and a fitted grip.
    1d6 Book of Life - Standard Print version from the Temple of Life with a couple circled passages.
    1d6 Jar of Consecrated Earth - Woops, how'd that worm get in there?
    1d6 Horse - His age is starting to show, but he's no where near done yet.

    My Accomplishment:
    "I hope that this miserable creature can now be a suitable dog for the Lord."

    I'm thinking this character didn't really have that poor of a relationship with his family. They kind of forced him towards the path of being a dog against his will, but the more he did it, the more purpose he found in it and the more he liked it. Though he's still resentful at the feeling that they didn't want it for his own good.

    I also wanted to play up the 'dog' thing a bit in both his purpose and appearance. So he looks a bit ugly and really scruffy, which would be kinda disconcerting to people at first. A shave and a wash would probably do him a world of good, but he wants to look like he's scary and on the edge.

    Real quick - for stats, you went over. There's a minimum of 2d6 per Stat, not a bonus of +2d6 to each Stat on top of what you put in. You only get 13d6, and from that, you need to put at least 2d6 in each stat.

    And the accomplishment might need to be changed just a little. Because it's really a 50-50 chance you could fail at your accomplishment with every player, and how you have it written implies that he wouldn't make it as a Dog if he failed. Unless you were trying to say, "I hope I make a GOOD Dog," and not "I hope I can be a Dog". You could win or lose the first one and still be a Dog, and if you win, you're a little more confident, more zealous maybe, filled with Holy Spirit - and if you fail, it's a blow to all that you've worked for. You're a Dog, but by name alone, you know? Then throughout the game, you've got something to prove, and you're trying to say, "I'm better than what you think I am."

    Am I way off base with what you intended? The only restriction is that if your accomplishment fails, your Dog still has to be 100% completely playable.

    He looks very well-equipped and ready for what's gonna go down, and sounds like he's going to have all sorts of drama if family or destiny or things like that come up. I'm diggin' it.

    robotsunshine on
  • ShinyoShinyo Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Yes, that was spot on. I'll edit things accordingly.

    Shinyo on
  • NeadenNeaden Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    I think I'd be up for this. My schedule it pretty hectic but so long as its PBP I should be able to check multiple times throughout the day.

    Neaden on
  • edited March 2009
    Neaden wrote: »
    I think I'd be up for this. My schedule it pretty hectic but so long as its PBP I should be able to check multiple times throughout the day.

    perfect! go ahead and make your character. something encouraged in the rules is player-to-player feedback and suggestion on characters, if you guys are up for that.

    robotsunshine on
  • ShinyoShinyo Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Sure, sounds good.

    Shinyo on
  • NeadenNeaden Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Here are my stats. Character fluff and goal for training will probably go up tomorrow when I have a chance to work on them a bit more.
    Eleazar Ryder:

    Complicated History: 15d6 in Stat dice, 4d4 2d6 2d10 in Trait dice, 5d6 2d8 in Relationship dice
    Status
    6 Acuity
    4 Heart
    3 Body
    2 Will
    Traits:
    I know the Book of Life like the back of my Hand. 2d10
    I can shoot a varmint 1d6
    I'm a Dog now 1d6
    I've seen a Demon 2d4
    I love animals 2d4

    Relationships:
    Steward Glass 2 d8
    My Mule Patrick 1 d6

    Possessions:
    Coat 2d6
    Book of life 2d6
    Old Knife 1d4
    Patrick My Mule 2d6

    Neaden on
  • Kay2Kay2 Registered User
    edited March 2009
    Okay, I've been thinking about this for a while now. Sorry if I seemed quiet!
    Brother Caleb Dunn - Well-Rounded History

    Statistics - 17d6
    Acuity - 5
    Body - 3
    Heart - 6
    Will - 3

    Traits - 1d4, 4d6, 2d8
    Boyish Good Lucks - 1d4 - Being a pretty boy can get you in trouble, as well as help out.
    When I speak, people listen - 2d8 - Caleb is an excellent public speaker and negotiator.
    Horsemanship - 1d6
    I'm a Dog - 1d6
    I never miss a tin can - 1d6 - Caleb is a good shot, in theory. He's never shot at a real target before.
    Quick and Quiet - 1d6 - Caleb knows when it's best to stay quiet, and even be a little sneaky.
    I done made daddy proud o' me - 1d6

    Relationships - 4d6, 2d8
    Charity Dunn (Mother) - 2d6
    Abigail Allen (Schoolmistress) - 1d8

    Possessions
    Caleb's coat is exceptionally well-made, all the womenfolk in his family put their love and respect into the garment, embroidering bright patterns in red, yellow and gold with care and skill. On the left breast, there is a glorious sun, rays of orange and yellow illuminating a stylised furrowed field. The remainder of the coat has rows of geometric patterns, zig-zags, stripes and waves. The colours are warm and vibrant - reds, yellows, oranges and earth tones. There is but one 'flaw', a simple black cross at the collar - his father's stitch. 2d8
    A Colt revolver - 1d6 1d4
    A stationary set - 1d6
    Tempest (his horse) - 1d6
    Jar of Consecrated Earth - 1d6
    Book of Life - 1d6
    A worn photo of his family - 1d4

    My Accomplishment
    "I hope this makes daddy proud of me."

    Born into the Faith of All Things in the King of Life Reborn, Caleb was well-liked within his town, at school, and in his family. At least, amongst the womenfolk. His father always wanted him to be stronger, more assertive, more of a man, while Caleb was kind, soft and gentle. His calm and inoffensive demeanor charmed his mother, aunts and teachers, but caused him grief amongst his peers - the other boys at school. However, once the girls (including his schoolmistress, Abigail Allen) started sticking up for him, things calmed down somewhat. But having a woman defend a man forever marked him as weak in the eyes of others.

    That's when the Branch Steward, Brother Robert Cape, stepped in. He recognised the potential in young Caleb to calm the angry, to present the Words of the Faith of All Things to recalcitrant ears, and to tell the stories of the King of All Life. All he had to do was instill some steel in the boy's spine.

    Now, Caleb was far from stupid. Naive, yes, but not dumb. He recognised what Brother Robert was doing soon enough, and urged the Watchdog to pick someone stronger. "Teach Alice!" he told her. "She can fight as well as any of the boys! Or teach Joseph! There's no meanness in him, just strength and kindness!" "But Caleb," Brother Robert insisted. "Neither of them can spread the Word, like you."

    Caleb's tutoring continued, and jealousy had a habit of rising in the other kids in town. Smarts and social warmth were Caleb's strengths, his physical strength and confidence were his flaws. But Brother Robert was convinced that this boy had what it took. At sixteen, when he was first taught to shoot a pistol, his natural skill with the firearm boosted his conviction, though he was still far from a doughty brawler.

    Three days before his eighteenth birthday, Caleb was asked.
    "Caleb Dunn, the King of All Life needs you to be his Watchdog."
    "Brother Robert, I'll do all I can in his service, the King be willin'."
    He left, to start his training.

    Caleb did well in his study of the book, academic subjects and excelled at holding a crowd's attention. His tutors considered him gifted with Word, and just about adequate on Brawn and Mettle. When his coat arrived, his spirits soared, though the black stitch at the collar brought him down again.

    Well, consider this a first draft. I'm thinking about changing his background to 'Complicated History' to fit in with his relationship with his father, but as he was born into the faith, I'm not sure that's a great idea. It'd certainly allow me to flesh out his Traits a little, as there are a few things in there I wanted to pick, but couldn't really take within the allowance I had.

    Kay2 on
  • edited March 2009
    Kay wrote: »
    Okay, I've been thinking about this for a while now. Sorry if I seemed quiet!
    Brother Caleb Dunn - Well-Rounded History

    Statistics - 17d6
    Acuity - 5
    Body - 3
    Heart - 6
    Will - 3

    Traits - 1d4, 4d6, 2d8
    Boyish Good Lucks - 1d4 - Being a pretty boy can get you in trouble, as well as help out.
    When I speak, people listen - 2d8 - Caleb is an excellent public speaker and negotiator.
    Horsemanship - 1d6
    I'm a Dog - 1d6
    I never miss a tin can - 1d6 - Caleb is a good shot, in theory. He's never shot at a real target before.
    Quick and Quiet - 1d6 - Caleb knows when it's best to stay quiet, and even be a little sneaky.

    Relationships - 4d6, 2d8
    Charity Dunn (Mother) - 2d6
    Abigail Allen (Schoolmistress) - 1d8

    Possessions
    Caleb's coat is exceptionally well-made, all the womenfolk in his family put their love and respect into the garment, embroidering bright patterns in red, yellow and gold with care and skill. On the left breast, there is a glorious sun, rays of orange and yellow illuminating a stylised furrowed field. The remainder of the coat has rows of geometric patterns, zig-zags, stripes and waves. The colours are warm and vibrant - reds, yellows, oranges and earth tones. There is but one 'flaw', a simple black cross at the collar - his father's stitch. 2d8
    A Colt revolver - 1d6 1d4
    A stationary set - 1d6
    Tempest (his horse) - 1d6
    Jar of Consecrated Earth - 1d6
    Book of Life - 1d6
    A worn photo of his family - 1d4

    My Accomplishment
    "I hope this makes daddy proud of me."

    Born into the Faith of All Things in the King of Life Reborn, Caleb was well-liked within his town, at school, and in his family. At least, amongst the womenfolk. His father always wanted him to be stronger, more assertive, more of a man, while Caleb was kind, soft and gentle. His calm and inoffensive demeanor charmed his mother, aunts and teachers, but caused him grief amongst his peers - the other boys at school. However, once the girls (including his schoolmistress, Abigail Allen) started sticking up for him, things calmed down somewhat. But having a woman defend a man forever marked him as weak in the eyes of others.

    That's when the Branch Steward, Brother Robert Cape, stepped in. He recognised the potential in young Caleb to calm the angry, to present the Words of the Faith of All Things to recalcitrant ears, and to tell the stories of the King of All Life. All he had to do was instill some steel in the boy's spine.

    Now, Caleb was far from stupid. Naive, yes, but not dumb. He recognised what Brother Robert was doing soon enough, and urged the Watchdog to pick someone stronger. "Teach Alice!" he told her. "She can fight as well as any of the boys! Or teach Joseph! There's no meanness in him, just strength and kindness!" "But Caleb," Brother Robert insisted. "Neither of them can spread the Word, like you."

    Caleb's tutoring continued, and jealousy had a habit of rising in the other kids in town. Smarts and social warmth were Caleb's strengths, his physical strength and confidence were his flaws. But Brother Robert was convinced that this boy had what it took. At sixteen, when he was first taught to shoot a pistol, his natural skill with the firearm boosted his conviction, though he was still far from a doughty brawler.

    Three days before his eighteenth birthday, Caleb was asked.
    "Caleb Dunn, the King of All Life needs you to be his Watchdog."
    "Brother Robert, I'll do all I can in his service, the King be willin'."
    He left, to start his training.

    Caleb did well in his study of the book, academic subjects and excelled at holding a crowd's attention. His tutors considered him gifted with Word, and just about adequate on Brawn and Mettle. When his coat arrived, his spirits soared, though the black stitch at the collar brought him down again.

    Well, consider this a first draft. I'm thinking about changing his background to 'Complicated History' to fit in with his relationship with his father, but as he was born into the faith, I'm not sure that's a great idea. It'd certainly allow me to flesh out his Traits a little, as there are a few things in there I wanted to pick, but couldn't really take within the allowance I had.

    I could actually see strong community, what with the strong female support. Also might I say that Daddy's black stitch is stone cold bad ass.

    The accomplishment is good, open to interpretation. If you need more Traits, yeah, I'd say go with one of the Histories.

    robotsunshine on
  • edited March 2009
    Neaden wrote: »
    Here are my stats. Character fluff and goal for training will probably go up tomorrow when I have a chance to work on them a bit more.
    Eleazar Ryder:

    Complicated History: 15d6 in Stat dice, 4d4 2d6 2d10 in Trait dice, 5d6 2d8 in Relationship dice
    Status
    6 Acuity
    4 Heart
    3 Body
    2 Will
    Traits:
    I know the Book of Life like the back of my Hand. 2d10
    I can shoot a varmint 1d6
    I'm a Dog now 1d6
    I've seen a Demon 2d4
    I love animals 2d4

    Relationships:
    Steward Glass 2 d8
    My Mule Patrick 1 d6

    Possessions:
    Coat 2d6
    Book of life 2d6
    Old Knife 1d4
    Patrick My Mule 2d6

    I particularly like, "I've seen a Demon", and it's level of 2d4. The implications of how that might have fucked Eleazar up psychologically are intriguing.

    robotsunshine on
  • ShinyoShinyo Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Hahaha, love the black stitch. Like it's some horrible mark of shame that outsiders don't understand.

    Won't comment on Eleazer until it's finished. :)

    Shinyo on
  • Kay2Kay2 Registered User
    edited March 2009
    I can see how the Strong Community background would fit, but I was being woefully chauvanistic and thinking that male opinions held more weight in this setting. Complicated History would give me some more d4 traits, which could help show his lack of confidence (boyish good looks, I never miss a tin can, and possibly something to do with a need to show himself as strong and 'manly')... but I'm not sure. 1d4 is a positive trait with a downside that could complicate things, as I read it?

    I guess I'll sleep on it, then make a decision. If I switch, it's more likely to be Complicated History than Strong Community, as I think the character's concept focuses on living up to daddy's expectations more than 'all the wimminfolk thought he was how a man should be!' The black stitch on his coat is going to fuel something of a tic, I think. He'll fiddle with it (it's thick, coarse and tactile) when under duress.

    The basic concept's not going to cause any problems though, is it?

    Echoing Robot Sunshine on the 'I've seen a demon - 2d4' trait. I love the concept of something so important to a character's psyche, yet it could work either way for him.

    I like the way Jacob seems to be fuelled by his sheer will to prove himself worthy, and the way his stats reflect that. I've always been interested in the idea of a character who gets things done because they're just so damned dedicated to doing it due to grit, resolve and faith. I can imagine him walking through some sort of hellish sandstorm, ignoring everything while just staring at his goal and getting there.

    Kay2 on
  • ShinyoShinyo Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    "Getting there...because my Master the Lord God wills it"

    Yeah, this is going to be fun.

    Shinyo on
  • edited March 2009
    Okay, so let's do initiations. Neaden, we'll save you for last to give you time. We'll do initiations here, in the OOC thread, since they're part of character creation, and when I make the IC thread, I'll post the streamlined version up for all to see.

    We'll do this one at a time, starting with Shinyo. We normally do these one at a time, but we'll start someone else's tomorrow (both if possible), and if we need to, someone else's the next day, and they'll all be simultaneous - but understand, none of you can be present at or interfere with another's Initiation.

    What we do: We both take up sides. Since your particular accomplishment is about growth or changing of the character:

    "I hope that this miserable creature can now be a good enough Dog for the Lord."

    then you play your character as he is, in need of change - as a miserable creature, unsure if he can be good enough. Spineless, not confident.

    Me, I play whatever pressures or forces exist that want you to change. Even though you want your character to change, here, you must fight against me with the same determination your character would.

    Your accomplishment is the STAKES. Who's involved, you and me. I'll be your Teachers at the Temple - remember, they don't make you a Dog, they just make sure you're prepared if you decide to be. They humiliate, train, encourage, intimidate, help, and inspire.
    - - -

    The Stage:
    "It's almost nightfall, right before supper. At Reading, they got to talking, and said, Sure, Brother Jacob's got the Faith in him, but maybe he ain't got the mettle. Maybe he ain't ready to pass Judgement instead of just preach about it.

    Or maybe he ain't a-scared. Maybe Brother Jacob just don't have the drive, don't have the Dee-vine Fire in him what makes a Dog. Maybe he's gonna make the wrong decision. Maybe kill an innocent. Maybe let the guilty go free.

    They call you out, ahead of everyone, and you don't know what to say right off. This is the first time you've heard such.

    And right before you go to Mess Hall, your Teachers block the way, Father Daniels at the head. Arms folded, long robes and ceremonial cloth adorned - official and powerful in a way you will never be - they bar you from eating.

    "This here's where the King's Watchdogs eat," one says. "It's a privilege to even be here. We don't send you on your way with the Good Book and a gun just for showing up, son."

    They stare you straight down. "Just here 'cause the family made 'im. Maybe you need to pack yer things and git on, leave Bridal Falls. Else you tell us why you deserve to eat from the same plates' God's soldiers do. You ain't nothing from miserable."

    - - -

    Dice!
    Take up dice! Right now we're just talking, so you roll Acuity + Heart. You can also roll your Relationship dice for Father Daniels at 2d6. For initiations, the GM always rolls 4d6 + 4d10. I'll start with the first Raise, and you See in response, putting dice forth (remember the rules for Seeing and the number of dice you use). You can use any Traits or Belongings, all's cool. And win or lose, you get a new d6 Trait.

    Roll your dice and post them in your response, all of them, so we can see each others. There's an element of strategy to this as well. Each time you Raise or See, post which dice you have remaining. To be uniform and convenient for all players, any dice that are part of a Raise should be colored CYAN, any that part of a See should be colored DARK ORANGE.

    Post your See, and then post again, posting your Raise.

    (dice: 4, 2, 3, 2, 9, 7, 1, 5)

    I'll start you off easy (evil cackle):

    RAISE:
    Father Daniels takes a step forward, taking a deep, heavy breath, his ancient robes hugging to his ankles. The Mark of the Tree is adorned upon the center and bottom, with a white line connecting the two marks. "I'll say it again, son - tell us, right now, in front of God and all, why we let you break bread with the real Dogs? Or best be turnin' 'round and headin' back west. Them crops ain't gonna pick themselves."
    (dice: 4, 2)

    robotsunshine on
  • edited March 2009
    Kay wrote: »
    I can see how the Strong Community background would fit, but I was being woefully chauvanistic and thinking that male opinions held more weight in this setting. Complicated History would give me some more d4 traits, which could help show his lack of confidence (boyish good looks, I never miss a tin can, and possibly something to do with a need to show himself as strong and 'manly')... but I'm not sure. 1d4 is a positive trait with a downside that could complicate things, as I read it?

    I guess I'll sleep on it, then make a decision. If I switch, it's more likely to be Complicated History than Strong Community, as I think the character's concept focuses on living up to daddy's expectations more than 'all the wimminfolk thought he was how a man should be!' The black stitch on his coat is going to fuel something of a tic, I think. He'll fiddle with it (it's thick, coarse and tactile) when under duress.

    The basic concept's not going to cause any problems though, is it?

    Echoing Robot Sunshine on the 'I've seen a demon - 2d4' trait. I love the concept of something so important to a character's psyche, yet it could work either way for him.

    I like the way Jacob seems to be fuelled by his sheer will to prove himself worthy, and the way his stats reflect that. I've always been interested in the idea of a character who gets things done because they're just so damned dedicated to doing it due to grit, resolve and faith. I can imagine him walking through some sort of hellish sandstorm, ignoring everything while just staring at his goal and getting there.

    The concept's not a problem at all! It's very well done. I'm excited about all three characters.

    Male opinions do hold more weight, but it's not actively biased. It's more of, "you cook and clean, I build and work", and everything's fine - but if a woman wants to do more than what the Faith says she should (save for a female Dog, of course), then there's problems. Defying your position in the Stewardship (the hierarchy of responsibility) is actually a transgression of the Faith. If you're a married woman and you're not tending to the family, not cooking and cleaning, out having adventure, trying to do a man's work, you can get in trouble. Same for men. The way the roles work out, they save the boring, menial stuff for the ladies, and the important stuff for the guys. I guess, in summary, it's like, "We're ALMOST equal. I'm working to put food on the table, you know!"

    A d4 trait can be either a) a negative trait or drawback, or b) a positive trait that just isn't important to your character. It's more about emphasis than anything else - it's a bad trait because your character doesn't care, and he doesn't care because of either personal reasons, or he's just inept.

    If you need more help, just let me know.

    robotsunshine on
  • NeadenNeaden Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    OK, here is a further draft of my character.
    Eleazar was raised by the mountain folk in a village nearby a Faithful town. After disputes between the village and the town escalated the mountain folk shaman cursed the town with infertility of crops and women. Eventually the Dogs came lead the faithful to victory over the mountain folk, attacking when they were in the midst of some foul ritual. The Dogs declared only the children should be spared to be raised by faithful families that had lost a child in the conflict. Eleazar was around nine years old at the time and when the faithful came he was found tied up and adorned with strange signs painted on him, a knife by his side and a terrified look on his face. He refuses to tell anyone exactly what the faithful interrupted or how the strange claw like wounds came to be on the bodies of two faithful and one mountain man nearby where he was found. He was adopted and raised by Steward Ryder of the town in place of their lost daughter.
    Eleazar grew up to be a hard working and observant, but not very bright boy. He excelled at memorizing passages from the book of life but floundered behind his peers in arithmetic and other studies. Growing up in the house of the steward and the shadow of his murdered daughter made him lack confidence and he usually ends up deferring his opinion to someone who looks like they know what is going on. He is very superstitious because of his early years with the mountain folk and has an especial fear of black cats. On the farm he was able to take care of the Stewards large cattle herd and likely would have stayed there his entire life were it not for a strange recurring dreams of scenes of peace and tranquility and chaos and war he began to have around the age of sixteen. The steward listened and interpreted these dreams as signs of some special future the King of Life had planned out for Eleazar, eventually sending him off to be trained as a Dog.

    Status
    6 Acuity
    4 Heart
    3 Body
    2 Will
    Traits:
    I know the Book of Life like the back of my Hand. 2d10
    I can shoot a varmint 1d6
    I'm a Dog now 1d6
    I've seen a Demon 2d4
    I love animals 2d4

    Relationships:
    Steward Ryder 2 d8
    My Mule Patrick 1 d6

    Possessions:
    Coat. Eleazar's coat is as unremarkable as the rest of him visually. It is not that the colors are especially drab or that the stitching is badly done. It is just neither good nor bad. 2d6
    Book of life. Eleazar carries a battered Book of Life on him at all times though the Steward used to joke that he did not need it as he had most of it in his head. 2d6
    Old Knife. The knife that was found next to Eleazar when the faithful saved him. 1d4
    Patrick My Mule. Patrick the Mule was the Stewards gift to Eleazar when he left his town. Eleazar raised him from a foal and frequently spent his time not working brushing or riding him. 2d6
    Hunting Rifle. 1d6 1d4
    My Accomplishment. "I hope that fear of my past will not run my life forever."

    Neaden on
  • ZombiemamboZombiemambo Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    If there's room, Sign Me Up

    Zombiemambo on
    JKKaAGp.png
  • Kay2Kay2 Registered User
    edited March 2009
    Oh, that's what I meant to ask. Do you guys use a specific dice-rolling site, application or whatever? I ask because my dice bag is someplace in the attic at my parent's place, which is about a million miles away.

    I heard good things about Magic Castle, or something? I've never used a dice-rolling site before, though.

    Neaden, I'm liking the way your character had a radically different background to the rest of us, the whole conversion to the Faith thing works really well with your 'I've seen a demon' trait. The 1d4 knife is a nice touch, too. I take it that it's important to him, but he's possibly scared of it?

    I'm off to trawl Wikipedia for information on the setting, to see if I can flesh my background out some, and gain a better understanding of the theme. A friend of mine knows the game, though. I'll see if I can chat to her about it too.

    Kay2 on
  • ShinyoShinyo Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    VERY interesting background, there. I love it.

    Also for dice rolling, I like using This if we're on the honor system.
    =========

    (Dice: 3, 1, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5, 2, 2)
    So it looks like I can dodge or block...

    See:
    Jacob thinks. It was true, at first he didn't even want to be here. But things have changed, Jacob isn't the same man he once was.
    "Why?...Because I..." Jacob gulps, "Because I can be a Dog. I can be a good Dog!"
    Dice: 1, 5

    =========

    Is that all right? I make a separate post for the raise, right?
    Could I also add my trait: 1d6 - "My family wanted this for me, but I do not do it for them, but for the Lord my Master." ?

    Shinyo on
  • El SkidEl Skid The frozen white northRegistered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Since I like making characters in new systems to try em out, let me make a character, and if you need a reserve you can give me a PM :)

    Character Name: Talitha Brown
    Age: 22
    Background: Well Rounded

    History:
    Talitha was a tomboy growing up. She never really cared for the things of women, though she learned them because her father made her. But she pushed the boundries whenever she could, learning to read and write very well, helping her brothers with some un-ladylike chores, and generally being a dissapointment to her mother.

    When she reached her 14th birthday her grandmother died and left her a very old copy of the Book of Life. Grieving for her grandmother, who had been quite close, she read through the book, and marveled at the miracles and compassion shown therin- up until that point in her life religion had been a stuffy set of rules that wanted her to do things she didn't want to. Quite quickly, though, she reformed her life, dedicating it to the Father and helping those around her to hear His message, and to better themselves so that they could serve him better.

    Being a quick learner and caring greatly about others (especially children), she finished her schooling and stayed on as an assistant to the teacher, and from there became a teacher herself. She was found to be incredibly smart and passionate about her work, and began to make a big difference in the community. Her children became well behaved and conscientious, and also started to show remarkable knowledge of- and observance to- the Book.

    Her only remaining rebelliousness was that she steadfastly refused to marry. This eventually came to the ears of a Dog, who confronted her about refusing to marry a local boy her parents had selected for her when she was getting outside of marriageable age.

    "Sir, with all due respect- that boy is not worthy of me. When I marry, it will be to a man who is intelligent enough hold to up his end of a conversation with me, and strong enough to stand by me and do what needs to be done in His name. Until then, I'll remain chaste, happily spend my life serving the Father of All Things and teaching others the joy that comes with doing so."

    Talitha is extremely compassionate and intelligent, though she doesn't like violence. Though she carries a gun with her, she rarely uses it, preferring to turn sinners onto the right path rather than to remove them from the way altogether.

    Numbers and such:
    Stats(17):
    Acuity: 5
    Heart: 8
    Body: 2
    Will: 2

    Traits: (1d4 4d6 2d8)
    I live to teach: 2d8
    I learned how to shoot if I have to: 1d6
    I've learned alot from books: 2d6
    I can do anything a man can do: 1d6
    I have a soft heart: 1d4

    Relationships(4d6 2d8):
    Father Jethro 1d6
    Mayor Thaddeus 1d6

    Belongings:

    My Coat 2d6- A suprisingly pretty coat- Her family helped half-heartedly, but her students and their families put extra care and attention into it: She was well respected, and the work and planning that went into it shows.
    Old revolver 1d6 1d4 - Hardly ever used, but a gift from the mayor of her town.
    Book of Life 1d8 1d6- A very old copy handed down to her by her grandmother
    Bessie- my Horse 1d6- A very calm mare- not the fastest, but she hardly ever starts or gets excited
    My books- 2d8- A collection of the most important books she owns and has found. Books on Math, Philosophy, Grammar, Etiquette, even one that she keeps well hidden on recognizing and dealing with demons... Whatever she is reading now, or thinks might come in handy.
    Jar of Consecrated earth 1d6
    Sewing kit- 1d6
    Pots and Pans- 1d8 Hand-made to her specifications, these are light-weight but conduct heat very well

    Accomplishment: I hope I proved that I am as deserving of the title of God's Watchdog as any man is

    El Skid on
    mrpaku wrote: »
    my name is precisionk and i'm ten tanks

    wrath God fear traitor evil
  • edited March 2009
    Kay wrote: »
    Oh, that's what I meant to ask. Do you guys use a specific dice-rolling site, application or whatever? I ask because my dice bag is someplace in the attic at my parent's place, which is about a million miles away.

    I heard good things about Magic Castle, or something? I've never used a dice-rolling site before, though.

    Neaden, I'm liking the way your character had a radically different background to the rest of us, the whole conversion to the Faith thing works really well with your 'I've seen a demon' trait. The 1d4 knife is a nice touch, too. I take it that it's important to him, but he's possibly scared of it?

    I'm off to trawl Wikipedia for information on the setting, to see if I can flesh my background out some, and gain a better understanding of the theme. A friend of mine knows the game, though. I'll see if I can chat to her about it too.

    As far as the book goes, the official rule is to emphasize the parts of the setting that are important to your group, letting other stuff simply exist. I'll add more stuff up for setting for you, though the book itself only lists the real basic things, giving you a colorful framework for you to explore yourself.

    Like, I could see for this group, that the way family works is pretty important, so I'll be posting more on gender roles and the Stewardship hierarchy.
    Is that all right? I make a separate post for the raise, right?
    Could I also add my trait: 1d6 - "My family wanted this for me, but I do not do it for them, but for the Lord my Master." ?

    A separate post would be cool, yeah. You could also just divide your post in two and mark the See part in orange and Raise part in Cyan if you're lazy.

    For your trait - you can add that if it is applicable to your Raise. If your Raise is going to be about how your family wanted you to do it, but you're doing it for the Lord your Master, then roll away. Remember the timing: roll the Trait first, then decide what dice to use. Also remember, you can only use a Trait or Belonging once per conflict (well, you can use it several times, but you only get its dice once).

    Later on today, I'll be back with my return See, everyone else's Initiation, and maybe we can see about adding another player or so depending on everyone's ability to post. The game truly shines with three players, and more than five means people are going to take the backseat.
    Also for dice rolling, I like using This if we're on the honor system.

    We totally are (on the honor system, I mean). Use Wizards', like Shinyo pointed out, or google a dice roller and try the first few links. Lots of simple stuff.

    robotsunshine on
  • Kay2Kay2 Registered User
    edited March 2009
    Okay, bookmarked a dice-roller, and reading up on here. I'm at a party tonight, so depending on how I feel afterwards, I might check in afterwards for my initiation start. I may have to leave it until tomorrow morning if I get absolutely roaring drunk, though.

    Hopefully, watching this conflict should give me an idea of how the mechanics work out - it's like betting in a card game right, but using dice for your cashmonies?

    Kay2 on
  • edited March 2009
    Kay wrote: »
    Okay, bookmarked a dice-roller, and reading up on here. I'm at a party tonight, so depending on how I feel afterwards, I might check in afterwards for my initiation start. I may have to leave it until tomorrow morning if I get absolutely roaring drunk, though.

    Hopefully, watching this conflict should give me an idea of how the mechanics work out - it's like betting in a card game right, but using dice for your cashmonies?

    Yes, except the winner doesn't get the stuff you bet. They win something else entirely. But, basically, yeah.

    robotsunshine on
  • ShinyoShinyo Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    I am lazy, so I'll just do see and raise in the same post separated from now on.

    ===
    (Dice: 3, 4, 4, 5, 5, 2, 2)
    Raise:

    Something starts to well up within Jacob's chest. It feels like justice. It feels like righteousness.
    "And...and more than that, I've earned the right to be a Dog! Y'all know damn well I've outclassed over half the people in that room in one way or another these past years!"
    Dice: 4, 5

    Shinyo on
  • edited March 2009
    INITIATIONS

    Shinyo
    (dice: 3, 2, 9, 7, 1, 5)
    See:
    One of others shakes his head - he has a gruff voice, almost raspy. "That ain't all we're lookin' for, Jacob. It ain't about who's the strongest, who's toughest. It's who's fit for it, son. It's fer who's got that special callin' with the King of Life."
    (dice: 7, 2) Dodge / Block (could've Turned the Blow, but I'll need that 9 later)

    (dice: 3, 9, 1, 5)
    Raise:
    "Look, point is... you got yer moments, but it ain't enough. Ain't Dog potential. We don't call 'em, but we know how to make 'em. Them kids in there? They done heard God almighty himself call them out and tell them they 'sposed to be here. They all done had a sign. What's your sign, Jakey?"
    (dice: 9, 3)

    Kay
    My dice rolled are: (dice: 2, 4, 3, 1, 7, 8, 1, 1) which means you will totally stomp me.

    Our stage is outside of the temple, on one of the massive cliffs at the head of one of the four waterfalls. It's after target practice, which everyone did exceedingly well at, shooting across to the other cliffs. Almost noon, warm but breezy. You've just gotten a letter that morning from home, and it's from Dad:

    "son, dont back unless you are passing thru to spread gospel. the only son i got from now on is a watchdog in service to the Lord. if you are not that then my son died at bridal falls"

    For a moment, out on that cliff, you imagine your own dead body, sprawled across the grass under the tree. You see an old, broken tombstone and a vacant funeral.

    The guy training you is some strong, tall fellow in his late 30s, burned red from working in the sun. He's got a grip like a crushing stone and just about the same demeanor. With him, it's either, you shut up and listen or you get the hell out, and he'll show you the door personally. He's had you all sit on the grass, giving you all some pep talk about family after the shooting.

    "You all got kin. They got you a coat comin', and they at home prayin' and hopin' you make them proud."

    You see Dad, scowling at you as you come back in from fraternizing with the womenfolk.

    "Each of you a family, a Mama and a Father, who raised you right since you was just a baby."

    You see yourself, flinching and holding your breath, as Dad loses his temper and screams one night. It wasn't anything you did, just stress, but he sure did say a few hurtful things.

    "Ya'll, one at a time, come up to me. Pick somebody that means a lot to ya, and pretend that's me. You come up to me and tell them what they deserve to hear! Praise God!"

    We're just talking, roll Acuity + Heart.

    Raise:
    "You first, Dunn. Knew some of your distant relations from back west." He calls you up, having you stand almost toe to toe with him. "Haven't met the family personally, but I know you'll tell me all about 'em, won't you? Spread that love, son. (a mental image: Dad seeing you off - "Don't you embarrass me, boy. I got that coat already gettin' worked on. You come back a man, y'hear?") What you got to say to me, boy?"

    And it's uncanny how much he looks and sounds just like Daddy right now.
    My Raise - (dice: 4, 2)

    Neaden
    My dice rolled are: (dice: 2, 6, 5, 6, 7, 5, 6, 6) and no I'm not kidding, and yes you are in for a world of hurt.

    The stage:
    It's late, about time for bed, and two of the other Dogs - bunch of racist jackals, you know them well - are talking loud enough for you to hear.

    "You can't trust them savages, I tell ya. Just as soon slit yer throat as steal yer packmule!"
    And the other nods.

    You got weird looks like any "civilized" Mountain Man would, but the majority of them embraced you as a blessed convert to the Faith. You were taught and treated just like any other (though your heritage has never once come up), and everything's been going good except for these two.

    Zeke and Thomas. Troublemakers, heeding the call of God.

    Again, loud enough you can hear. "I'm 'bout 'fraid to go to sleep with that one in the room. Lord knows he'd just as soon cut our throats and make off with our purses."
    And Thomas says, "You tell it, Brother."

    It's been like this non-stop, but they've been smart enough to hold their tongue in front of the Teachers. What spare free time you get is consumed by this sort of crap, though.

    Coming in the room and looking over at your bed, you can see Zeke's got his muddy old boots thrown on your sheets, dirt and grass all over the things. He's staring you down hard as you enter.

    "I tell you what, though. I ain't about to keep puttin' up with it."

    We're just talking, roll Acuity + Heart.

    Raise:
    "Speak up, injun! Heard they found you tied to a totem pole, 'bout to be sacrificed to some tiger god or some mess."

    The events of that night replay in your mind. These days, they send an eerie chill down your spine. Some of it is murky, like you're purposefully trying to block some of it out - but some parts of it, they are oh so clear.

    Thomas spits on the floor. "Know what? I heard he's next to be eaten. Them Mountain People, they eat ever' second-born son, you better believe it. Why else you think he don't wanna talk about it? He's 'shamed."

    You never do talk about it. It's your secret, yours to keep and no one else's. All anyone has to do is bring it up and you shut up, shying away from the conversation. It's been keeping you from praying and shooting straight at times, and when you dream about it, you can't summon the strength in the morning to do your share of the work. The teachers know you had a "troubled past", and they don't pretend to understand the minds of the Mountains, but you've gotten some shifty looks.

    Zeke stands up, staring you down. "Keep that mess out of here, you hear me? We don't do all that. We serve the King of Life - ever hear of 'im? Damn shame they even let you in this temple."

    You only half hear... mostly, your mind's replaying it, over and over. What's worse, you're starting to remember all those old superstitions and tribal folk sayings. You're starting to feel... not at home. More of who you are then you've let show.

    Your lips lock, and you're not sure if you can speak.
    Here's my Raise - (dice: 5, 2) Unless you roll really well or escalate like a motherfucker, things aren't looking good.

    Guys, I'll be back later tonight with more setting and family info, and some other stuff.

    robotsunshine on
  • ShinyoShinyo Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Hmm, so before I respond, I'd like to know the consequences a bit better.

    God just got dragged into the argument. Can I now roll dice as applicable to Relationship with God?
    Otherwise, I'd have to use at least 3 dice to see your raise, so what exactly do Fallout Dice do?
    If I give, is that the end of the initiation? Or is there still more to it?
    I'd also ask about escalation, but threatening/beating up on your teachers is generally a bad thing.

    Shinyo on
  • edited March 2009
    Shinyo wrote: »
    Hmm, so before I respond, I'd like to know the consequences a bit better.

    God just got dragged into the argument. Can I now roll dice as applicable to Relationship with God?
    Otherwise, I'd have to use at least 3 dice to see your raise, so what exactly do Fallout Dice do?
    If I give, is that the end of the initiation? Or is there still more to it?
    I'd also ask about escalation, but threatening/beating up on your teachers is generally a bad thing.

    You can't roll for God as a Relationship, because the only time you roll a Relationship is if God is your opponent, or if the Stakes are about God (they're not, they're about you). If you have a trait that defines you and your standing with God, though, go right ahead.

    Also, if your current dice won't work, bring a Trait or Belonging into the Raise. "My Faith is unshakable" could apply, if you show they can't get to you about what God's plan for you is. Or whip out the Book of Life and read from it for something dramatic, and get dice there. Even better, lean in and show off your scary face, getting all serious and intimidating, saying it's not their choice, it's God's, or something like that.

    If you Give, that is the end. Usually, you'd be able to come back a scene or two later for a follow-up conflict if you wanted, but not here. Winner take all.

    Okay, Fallout Dice are rolled, and then you see what the sum of your two highest numbers is. Just Talking, here, you're probably not going to get higher than 8, and that's a short term consequence.

    SHORT-TERM CONSEQUENCES
    - Subtract 1 from any Stat for your next conflict.
    - Take a new 1d4 Trait for your next conflict. (you read correctly)
    - Change a Relationship to d4 size for the next conflict.
    - Have your character leave the scene and spend some time alone.

    If it's 8 or higher, that's a Long-Term Consequence:
    - Subtract 1 from a Stat.
    - Take a new 1d4 Trait.
    - Add 1d to an existing d4 Trait or Relationship.
    - Subtract 1d from any non-d4 Trait or Relationship
    - Change the size of a Trait or Relationship to d4.
    - Lose a Belonging.
    - Rewrite your coat's description to include permanent damage. Reduce your coat's dice if necessary.

    Also, if you roll any 1s, you get something good:
    - Add 1 to a Stat.
    - Create a new Trait at 1d6.
    - Add or subtract 1 die from an existing Trait.
    - Change the d-size of an existing Trait.
    - Create a new 1d6 Relationship.
    - Add or subtract 1 die from a Relationship.
    - Change the d-size of a Relationship.
    - Get a new Belonging.

    So it's not all bad. Low-grade Fallout is actually pretty cool to have, unless you get stiffed. Higher-grade Fallout, you won't reach until the guns come out.

    Oh, and whatever you get has to make sense, and you have to justify it. You can't just pick which one you want, it has to fit the scene. That's why it's scary - sometimes it makes sense to get shot in the face, and that's the only logical choice available.

    You MAY get long-term, and that would matter, but the short-term would be completely ignored for the initiation. And yes, you can actually get a new Trait. This is taken at 1d4 and represents a new complication in your life (yes, even though, fluff-wise it's bad, you still are getting a new Trait. It's mechanically good, but character-ly bad. I know it seems a bit odd, but sometimes it totally makes sense that you get some sort of good out of your misfortune).

    You can go for Physical but not fighting, that is an arena. That could be a firm grip, grabbing someone, something dramatic and imposing like that, but not necessarily violent. But definitely bold.

    robotsunshine on
  • NeadenNeaden Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    So I roll Heart + Acuity right? That's 10 d6 which gives me 6,1,1,1,3,2,4,4,3,3.....crap.
    I'll See with 3,4
    "I..I d-don't have to l-listen to you Zeke. I'm t-training to be a Dog just live everyone else here is. You're ancestors converted to the Faith once upon a time to! I just did it a little bit later."


    Now I'm not sure how to do this next part. What if I want to invoke one of my traits here? I'm thinking specifically of "I know the Book of Life like the back of my hand" to quote some scripture here. Do I just roll those two dice and use them for my raise?

    Neaden on
  • edited March 2009
    Neaden wrote: »
    So I roll Heart + Acuity right? That's 10 d6 which gives me 6,1,1,1,3,2,4,4,3,3.....crap.
    I'll See with 3,4
    "I..I d-don't have to l-listen to you Zeke. I'm t-training to be a Dog just live everyone else here is. You're ancestors converted to the Faith once upon a time to! I just did it a little bit later."


    Now I'm not sure how to do this next part. What if I want to invoke one of my traits here? I'm thinking specifically of "I know the Book of Life like the back of my hand" to quote some scripture here. Do I just roll those two dice and use them for my raise?

    If you want to invoke your Traits, you do it as part of a Raise or a See. To do it, simply say "I'm using (whatever Trait)", and let your character use it somehow. Here's a step by step:

    1. It's your turn to Raise or See.
    2. You want to use a Trait.
    3. Say that you are using the Trait.
    4. Roll the Trait's dice before doing anything else.
    5. You now make your Raise or See as normal, involving the Trait - the only difference is you have more dice to pick from.
    6. You don't have to use the dice you rolled for the Trait. Using the Trait just gives you a better pool of dice, it doesn't give you dice you have to use.
    7. Now you can't use that Trait again this conflict.

    robotsunshine on
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