As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/

Limp [DOODLE]

1444547495062

Posts

  • LeggraphicsLeggraphics Registered User
    edited June 2009
    The dino looks like he's crouching to get into shot.

    He is photogenic haha nah

    mmm Thanks mustang. I get ya. I might expand the canvas to show his upperbody a bit more. If i enable myself to draw the whole body it might make it more balanced I really just wanted his neck and head to apear like they are coming down out of nowhere but it looked crap so I needed to add a body to balance. I see what you mean now

    Leggraphics on
  • MustangMustang Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    If you keep the head the same size you could put 95% of the body out of frame.....maybe just part of the chest and dingly arms in the top right.

    Mustang on
  • winter_combat_knightwinter_combat_knight Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Prison_Concept_1_by_WinterCombatKnight.jpg

    I don't care what Manon says, the perspective on that glass part makes me twitch in discomfort just looking at it.
    I actually don't dig either of the blue ones, there's a difference between not trying for accurate perspective, and trying, but not quite getting it right. These seem more like the latter where the earlier piece I was talking about was more like the former.

    I do however really dig the last one- the lobby-ish area. I think it'd be better with a hand-drawn texture on the ground plane.

    I hope you fellas realised those are from a year ago. though id like to re-visit the concept again. I think at the time i was playing too much bioshock.

    winter_combat_knight on
  • LeggraphicsLeggraphics Registered User
    edited June 2009
    mm a little better?
    dinoriver23.jpg

    Leggraphics on
  • winter_combat_knightwinter_combat_knight Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    little more work on it. I'm trying a few new things I have lernt in magazines and in the traditional painting I recently did. Not happy wih the dinosaur yet. Spent about 2- 2.5 hours on it
    dino_attack_by_Leggraphics.jpg

    man, this is better than the last progress shot. i think youre heading in the right direction with your crazy ideas. Its just a matter of practicing. Keep it up and i reckon you'll be producing some freaking sweet badass work within another year. Your progress is already great.

    winter_combat_knight on
  • MustangMustang Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Ja, much better.

    I have to ask, how the fuck did you do that rock effect?
    dinoriver23.jpg
    It's pretty sweet.

    Mustang on
  • LeggraphicsLeggraphics Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Mustang wrote: »
    Ja, much better.

    I have to ask, how the fuck did you do that rock effect?
    dinoriver23.jpg
    It's pretty sweet.

    mmm i bought a few digital art magazines for the first time this week just to have a squizz.. Turns out allot of pros get other pictures of rocks and make their own texture out of them. Which is what I did. And then I used the rubber stamp tool to transfer it over my colours as a black and white overlay using 'overlay' as the layer setting. Then adjust the overall look to match the light source and angle of rock using transforms and distorts. it looks great doesnt it. I just did a bit to see what it looked like. Ill use it for all the rock faces when im done laying out

    Leggraphics on
  • RubberACRubberAC Sidney BC!Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Tam wrote: »
    progress!

    6rj1iq.jpg

    OH i remember her now!

    yessss

    RubberAC on
  • MustangMustang Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Nice, I've got a big piece I've been working on and off for about 2-3 months with a lot of rock face, I'll have to give this a go.

    Mustang on
  • LeggraphicsLeggraphics Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Mustang wrote: »
    Nice, I've got a big piece I've been working on and off for about 2-3 months with a lot of rock face, I'll have to give this a go.

    lets have a look what you have so far? :) a couple of months.... wow I wish i had much time:s between my two jobs i dont have allot of time

    Leggraphics on
  • TamTam Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Well, kiss your mothers because here comes Armageddon:

    finished

    n3rj36.jpg

    Tam on
  • ManonvonSuperockManonvonSuperock Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    is the split-color girl with phantom arms a pop culture reference that's slipping by my outdated ass?

    ManonvonSuperock on
  • TamTam Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    is the split-color girl with phantom arms a pop culture reference that's slipping by my outdated ass?

    the split hair color is a straight rip-off of Terry Pratchett's Susan (Death's granddaughter), but other than that, no.

    Tam on
  • desperaterobotsdesperaterobots perth, ausRegistered User regular
    edited June 2009
    It's delightful Tam.

    Are you... are you sure it's finished?

    desperaterobots on
  • ManonvonSuperockManonvonSuperock Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    color that muh' fucka

    ManonvonSuperock on
  • TamTam Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    my coloring is awful

    Tam on
  • MustangMustang Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I expect..nay, demand colour!

    Mustang on
  • RubberACRubberAC Sidney BC!Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Tam have you ever held a teapot like that
    it's pretty hot man

    RubberAC on
  • TamTam Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I'm not a hat monster familiar

    Tam on
  • ManonvonSuperockManonvonSuperock Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    outsource it.

    ManonvonSuperock on
  • LeggraphicsLeggraphics Registered User
    edited June 2009
    I dont think ill have much time to work on it this weekend so I will post it now. :)
    Still a WIP

    The dino doesnt really match the scenery at the moment, I will try to adjust the colours later. Mustang. That rock technique works really well. I havnt finished yet but its coming up a treat
    dino_running_wip_by_Leggraphics.jpg

    Leggraphics on
  • GodfatherGodfather Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Those rocks are so realistic looking it's scary.

    That's a nice hat trick you've pulled off.

    Godfather on
  • srsizzysrsizzy Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    That "rock trick" is "cheating." I really don't think imposing textures over rocks as well as the dinosaur helps develop any kind of skills except for shortcutting. It works with someone who can make a pretty good picture without resorting to photo textures and who does it pretty creatively when they do, but for learning how to speed paint or color digitally at all, it's not going to help with anything other than you feeling good that it looks more realistic.

    Not trying to sound like a dick, I just think it's not helpful.

    srsizzy on
    BRO LET ME GET REAL WITH YOU AND SAY THAT MY FINGERS ARE PREPPED AND HOT LIKE THE SURFACE OF THE SUN TO BRING RADICAL BEATS SO SMOOTH THE SHIT WILL BE MEDICINAL-GRADE TRIPNASTY MAKING ALL BRAINWAVES ROLL ON THE SURFACE OF A BALLS-FEISTY NEURAL RAINBOW CRACKA-LACKIN' YOUR PERCEPTION OF THE HERE-NOW SPACE-TIME SITUATION THAT ALL OF LIFE BE JAMMED UP IN THROUGH THE UNIVERSAL FLOW BEATS
  • desperaterobotsdesperaterobots perth, ausRegistered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I agree with srsizzy. It's just like people who don't grind their own pigments out of rocks in the earth and 'buy' them from a 'store'.

    Cheating.

    desperaterobots on
  • ManonvonSuperockManonvonSuperock Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    in this case it depends on what's more important: process or product? journey or destination?

    ManonvonSuperock on
  • srsizzysrsizzy Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I agree with srsizzy. It's just like people who don't grind their own pigments out of rocks in the earth and 'buy' them from a 'store'.

    Cheating.
    Cheating was in quotes. I know it's not actually cheating. Plus, if you don't see that what you said is not at all analogous to what I said, I'm shocked.

    And Manon, I said that when I said "it's not going to help with anything other than you feeling good that it looks more realistic."

    Anyways, I do the same thing in photo manipulation/graphic design because I'm lazy. But I'll admit it: I'm lazy, I need to get something done or I'm just doing it because I'm bored. Legg, if you know you aren't really gaining much skill from doing it, then more power to you.

    srsizzy on
    BRO LET ME GET REAL WITH YOU AND SAY THAT MY FINGERS ARE PREPPED AND HOT LIKE THE SURFACE OF THE SUN TO BRING RADICAL BEATS SO SMOOTH THE SHIT WILL BE MEDICINAL-GRADE TRIPNASTY MAKING ALL BRAINWAVES ROLL ON THE SURFACE OF A BALLS-FEISTY NEURAL RAINBOW CRACKA-LACKIN' YOUR PERCEPTION OF THE HERE-NOW SPACE-TIME SITUATION THAT ALL OF LIFE BE JAMMED UP IN THROUGH THE UNIVERSAL FLOW BEATS
  • desperaterobotsdesperaterobots perth, ausRegistered User regular
    edited June 2009
    It's really about the application of the technique more than cheating, or laziness. Because, you know, if it winds up looking shit hot, who cares if it's a short cut. Inversely, I often feel poorly toward artists who pursue photo-realistic naturalistic stuff through traditional media. Just take a photo.

    desperaterobots on
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Inversely, I often feel poorly toward artists who pursue photo-realistic naturalistic stuff through traditional media. Just take a photo.

    I've heard a lot of people say this...and although this is neither here nor there - the purpose is not to just "have an image of the object"...at least, when I get involved in doing photoreal stuff, I do so because it's extremely technically challenging, and extremely satisfying if you're able to achieve even somewhat photoreal results. I mean, you could even say that about figure drawing in graphite, really - you get better and better and better, until, hypothetically, you get good enough to make it look photorealistic. Why stop before that? Why not work towards this goal? It's just skill development.
    twocents.gif

    NightDragon on
  • winter_combat_knightwinter_combat_knight Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I have no beef with the use of photos. Hell, it's 'illustration' not 'fine art'. But i agree that in terms of improving skills, photos don't help. Thats why i like to do acrylic and oil painting in my spare time, away from the computer.

    anyway. some sketches done this arvo...
    i got lazy with the last one so did it digitally rather than with watercolour

    b81nvq.jpg

    winter_combat_knight on
  • LeggraphicsLeggraphics Registered User
    edited June 2009
    umm not to burst bubbles here but in 3D bump maps are used all the time and they are just computer generated textures for most of the time. And in This case I made my own tileable texture before applying it to the canvas. I made my own texture out of parts of 5 or 6 phot0s and stuck them together and Then applied that texture over what I had already drawn. I dont think that is at all 'Cheating' and I think if you end up choosing to limit yourself to 'im living in the 1920's art will never progress.

    Dont get me wrong. Learning to draw that sort of rock formation texture by hand would be incredible but You would be there for a week solid doing it and to achieve nothing more than what I have. apart from some RSI.

    I think learning correct steps , fundamentals and techniques are important but also utilizing what you have including technology. Cheating is the completely wrong choice of word for it and I think it is very disrespectful and hurtful as the word is designed to be...

    anyway ... I learnt the technique from a magazine that has some of the best concept artists in the world posting and it was a tutorial sort of thing. Take this cheating up with them..

    Leggraphics on
  • OrikaeshigitaeOrikaeshigitae Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited June 2009
    Which magazine?

    Orikaeshigitae on
  • mattharvestmattharvest Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    umm not to burst bubbles here but in 3D bump maps are used all the time and they are just computer generated textures for most of the time. And in This case I made my own tileable texture before applying it to the canvas. I made my own texture out of parts of 5 or 6 phot0s and stuck them together and Then applied that texture over what I had already drawn. I dont think that is at all 'Cheating' and I think if you end up choosing to limit yourself to 'im living in the 1920's art will never progress.

    Dont get me wrong. Learning to draw that sort of rock formation texture by hand would be incredible but You would be there for a week solid doing it and to achieve nothing more than what I have. apart from some RSI.

    I think learning correct steps , fundamentals and techniques are important but also utilizing what you have including technology. Cheating is the completely wrong choice of word for it and I think it is very disrespectful and hurtful as the word is designed to be...

    anyway ... I learnt the technique from a magazine that has some of the best concept artists in the world posting and it was a tutorial sort of thing. Take this cheating up with them..

    Your attitude here is really quite extreme.

    No one in their right mind would suggest that bump mapping isn't appropriate in 3D art, but that's because the purpose of 3D art is not the same as painting. Each medium has a set of purposes which derives from the characteristics of the medium.

    In photography, the primary elements contributed by the artist are the composition, the lighting, and the general subject matter. The textures of particular elements are not crafted by the artist, but rather composited to create the texture of the finished piece.

    By contrast, in oil painting, the artist has to contribute all the visual elements, which means we generally judge the oil painting against a different standard of photorealism than we would for photography.

    With 3D animation/stills, it is more akin to photography in a lot of ways: the creation of a beautiful final image is a different skillset than the creation of the model or the textures involved. When we critique such work, we tend to break those skills apart in our analysis.

    For 2D digital painting, however, it's not the same issue. In theory, a 2D digital painter should be able to accomplish all of what a physical 2D painter should be able to do (with the obvious limitations being on the ability of software to simulate physical processes, etc.). This means a 2D digital painter using a texture should be regarded the same way we regard a traditional painter who uses other graphical elements to create not a true painting but a collage.

    Collage is a beautiful skill, no doubt. For example, the work over at Obey Giant demonstrates how wonderful the work can look. But it is delusional to suggest that we cannot criticize him for using collage elements if he pretends it's just a painting. It's not. It's a collage.

    That's the mistake you're making with this attitude: by using textures in your digital painting, you're not truly painting, but rather creating a collage.

    Of course, this is a spectrum. It's not as if college is ontologicaly separate from painting, and so some works will always be on the border between them. But you're acting as if college is not different at all from painting. It is, and you sound silly in suggesting there's no difference at all.

    I suspect your misunderstanding lies in the fact that many digital artists are not looking to make paintings in particular, but rather to create images - e.g. for concept art for a film, or whatnot - and images may be paintings or collages depending on what the artist and client want.

    mattharvest on
  • mattharvestmattharvest Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Dont get me wrong. Learning to draw that sort of rock formation texture by hand would be incredible but You would be there for a week solid doing it and to achieve nothing more than what I have. apart from some RSI.

    Oh, I want to focus on this paragraph: this sort of attitude is disgusting. It shows a complete lack of ability to appreciate the skill involved in such work, because while you call it "incredible" you say there would be no value in it above a photograph.

    If you think the only value in an image is how photorealistic it is, then you're dismissing essentially the entire concept of art as a subject unto itself, and relegating it permanently to an attempt to imitate photography. I cannot imagine you'll find anyone sympathetic to the idea that this is acceptable among artists or scholars.

    mattharvest on
  • NeoRedXIIINeoRedXIII Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Tam wrote: »
    is the split-color girl with phantom arms a pop culture reference that's slipping by my outdated ass?

    the split hair color is a straight rip-off of Terry Pratchett's Susan (Death's granddaughter), but other than that, no.

    Made me think of Okage: Shadow King (2001, PS2), but this hat combo is awesome.

    What's with everyone here now painting realistic dinos. I planned on capitilazing on dinosaurs as a fine art. Please stop. D:

    I'd help you with figuring out that rex legg since I've been studying them a bit, but I don't have the time right now.

    Edit: I'll maybe draw over it if I have time tomorrow or this weekend if you'd like. I can't tell most of it right now with out the full body figure to go by. A variety of sections of the skull seem to be from different positioned viewpoints. Did you try creating basic three dimensional shapes to create the structure of the skull? The axis created between the eyes don't seem to be parallel with the axis created between the corners of the mouth. Also, some skewed foreshortening or incorrect proportions seem to be happening on the snout and bottom jaw. I'll try and help you out when I have more time.

    NeoRedXIII on
  • TamTam Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    some flats:

    24cdqnk.jpg

    see? I told you I'm shit at colors

    Tam on
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Greyscale that shit, son. They're virtually all very saturated, and very similar values.

    Unless you're going for that psychedelic vibe, of course.

    NightDragon on
  • ScosglenScosglen Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Flat, graphic coloring can work fine like what you've done, but you should still take composition into consideration. Like ND said, it's all basically different high saturation (loud) hues of the same values, and they're fighting for attention. This is a totally wasted opportunity to use contrast to direct the eye, even with flats.

    Scosglen on
  • mattharvestmattharvest Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Usually, flats like that are put down in order to allow easy separation of sections for coloring; is that what you're doing here?

    mattharvest on
  • TamTam Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I was about to change them, but I've been called away to do housework. Scos, can you point me to some examples of what you're talking about?

    Tam on
  • ScosglenScosglen Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I don't have an example on hand, but all I meant was that you should make the value range in the image much wider, and put the areas of greatest contrast on the areas of greatest compositional significance (probably your characters or their hats). In color, you can use heavily saturated colors against desaturated colors, or warm against cool to add further dimension to the contrast.

    I would do a little paintover, but I have never liked using flats and would probably change the style too much.

    Scosglen on
This discussion has been closed.