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Galileo Was Wrong: The Hubris of Anti-Science

1356

Posts

  • LindenLinden Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    It's not live cells as far as I know, but live virus which has been genetically engineered to have a weakened infection vector I think? Possibly not genetically engineered - I imagine somewhere out there they just throw it in bleach or something.

    In this case, yes (given that all are caused by viral particles) – Y. pestis is bacterial, and the only true live cell vaccine I can think of in common use. There's enough conceptual overlap between a virus particle and cell for it to not be overly confusing, and in the mentioned case, I probably wouldn't bother with the distinction.

    Classically, attenuation is performed by taking advantage of mutation rates – when introduced into a novel cellular environment, a pathogen will (eventually!) adapt to it, which tends to limit its virulence in humans.

    The whole thing is an enormous field, though, and conjugate vaccines are particularly fascinating.

    Linden on
    What if this weren't a rhetorical question?
  • MalkorMalkor Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Hamurabi wrote: »
    Anyone want an equally scary, non-religious version of this thought?

    The anti-vaccination movement.

    Scary, scary shit.

    My grandmother knew people who died of Measles!

    Depending on the demographics, this is still a Real Thing.

    I also know at least one young person who doesn't get vaccinated because he had a reaction to a flu shot and got sick.

    I'm talking about the crazies who don't believe they are necessary or cause Autism.

    I've had two flu shots and was bedridden with the flu exactly twice.

    It seems to work well for everyone else in my family though.

    Pretty sure that it means that I'll be in the hospital if I ever contract it naturally. But I won't be surprised!

    Malkor on
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  • Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Hamurabi wrote: »
    Anyone want an equally scary, non-religious version of this thought?

    The anti-vaccination movement.

    Scary, scary shit.

    My grandmother knew people who died of Measles!

    Depending on the demographics, this is still a Real Thing.

    I also know at least one young person who doesn't get vaccinated because he had a reaction to a flu shot and got sick.

    I'm talking about the crazies who don't believe they are necessary or cause Autism.
    Some vaccines aren't really all that necessary anymore. But that's because we've basically wiped out the relevant diseases through past mass vaccinations of the population. I got the smallpox vaccine when I was a kid, but that's because I was born in Eastern Europe. I don't know of any Americans my age or younger who received that vaccine.

    Modern Man on
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  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Hamurabi wrote: »
    Anyone want an equally scary, non-religious version of this thought?

    The anti-vaccination movement.

    Scary, scary shit.

    My grandmother knew people who died of Measles!

    Depending on the demographics, this is still a Real Thing.

    I also know at least one young person who doesn't get vaccinated because he had a reaction to a flu shot and got sick.

    I'm talking about the crazies who don't believe they are necessary or cause Autism.
    Some vaccines aren't really all that necessary anymore. But that's because we've basically wiped out the relevant diseases through past mass vaccinations of the population. I got the smallpox vaccine when I was a kid, but that's because I was born in Eastern Europe. I don't know of any Americans my age or younger who received that vaccine.

    Smallpox is pretty definitively gone as far as I know.

    People don't get vaccinated for polio in western countries anymore, but I think isolated regions of Asia still have outbreaks every now and again?

    EDIT: The Australian vaccination schedule also doesn't include the Hep A vaccination, even though it exists - apparently because it's hard to contract and needs a lot of repeats to remain effective?

    electricitylikesme on
  • Edith_Bagot-DixEdith_Bagot-Dix Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    How can they call themselves Catholics when they are, quite literally, going against church teachings? I mean I don't expect the church to stop them or anything, but the church accepted heliocentrism and the fundamental correctness of the scientific method quite officially.

    One of the many "fun" things about Catholicism are the small minority of lay members who seem to take the whole thing more seriously than the Pope. My dad served for about a decade on the parish council in the town where he lives, and during that time had the unpleasant task of chairing the council while they were downsizing from two churches to one. This was for entirely practical reasons, like not having two priests and not having enough people contributing to pay to heat both churches (and associated buildings) during the winter. That's a fairly crappy thing to have to do (essentially confronting that the faith is dying in that area), and yet you would have people showing up to meetings demanding that they keep both churches open (just turn the heat off during the winter in Canada - Jesus didn't have indoor heating!), that they have masses in the Extraordinary Form (essentially the Pre-Vatican II Latin Mass), and writing weekly letters to the Archbishop citing every perceived fault and doctrinal error of the one remaining priest and demanding his removal and/or excommunication (where exactly they think they're going to get another priest is a mystery to everyone).

    Edith_Bagot-Dix on


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  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Actually, we do still have the polio vaccine, but it's also our tetanus, diphtheria and meningitis shot.

    Fencingsax on
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  • Technicus RexTechnicus Rex All your base.Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    emnmnme wrote: »
    DoctorArch wrote: »
    Things like this make me sad, because there are a multitude of people out there when confronted with this bullcrap will go "Well, let's see, you have a good point, but..." when the proper response is "I'm sorry, you're either stupid or willfully ignorant."

    Were you in orbit watching the earth move!? Were you there!? No, you weren't, you're just blindly following your textbooks.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l1msS71xL00

    *skip to 21:00*

    I love it how this guy is wearing a lab coat.

    It's as though he realises he needs to look scientific to be taken seriously.... So that he can disprove everything science has ever said ever.

    Technicus Rex on
    People like Coldplay and voted for the Nazi's. You can't trust people. - Super Hans.
  • Technicus RexTechnicus Rex All your base.Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    gotta love it when a specific group of Christians try to disprove science. these guys must be so insecure to make shit up like this,\.

    You see that bolded part right there? That's really important. In the same way that not all Muslims are fanatics, not all Christians are absurdly stupid.

    Yeah I know I was over-generalizing.

    but then again.... I actually do think that religious people are intellectually deficient. (Sorry if that includes you)

    If someone were to tell me that if they really really really pray hard enough to their best friend that they have never met in person and ask for forgiveness for every thing they have done in their life, then they will live forever (after they die), I actually am not able to take them very seriously from that point on.

    Technicus Rex on
    People like Coldplay and voted for the Nazi's. You can't trust people. - Super Hans.
  • Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Ho Ho Ho Disconnecting from Xbox LIVERegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Dude, not cool.

    Santa Claustrophobia on
  • TofystedethTofystedeth veni, veneri, vamoosi Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Mr_Rose wrote: »
    DoctorArch wrote: »
    Julius wrote: »
    DoctorArch wrote: »
    Cantido wrote: »
    turtle.gif

    Oh God, I want that on a shirt.

    <looks at the image link text> I can get it on a shirt!!! GLEEE!!!!!

    It's a sea-turtle people! GOD, THE IGNORANCE!



    (It's heresy to suggest it's a tortoise.)

    Mighty A'Tuin has a name, heathen. And it's a star turtle.

    That's "Great A'Tuin" heretic!
    Yes, but what is A'tuin's sex? I propose we build a giant bathyscaphe and lower it over the edge on a huge crane to find out.

    Tofystedeth on
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  • TachTach Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
  • AtomikaAtomika Brought to you by Technicolor™ Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Dude, not cool.

    Why? It's a completely irrational thing to say. Just because there's an overwhelming popular attachment to an irrational philosophy doesn't negate its irrationality.

    Atomika on
  • Bionic MonkeyBionic Monkey Registered User, ClubPA
    edited September 2010
    Man, Columbus's trouble convincing people wasn't that he thought the Earth was round it was that he thought it was like a third of the size it actually was (and the greeks proved it to be).

    Columbus was a lucky idiot and the whole tale of daring visionary is so much misinformation because it makes a simpler story.

    I was so, so utterly pissed off when I found that out. Something I'd believed for years, only to find out school just flat out fucking lied to me.

    Bionic Monkey on
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  • GoslingGosling Looking Up Soccer In Mongolia Right Now, Probably Watertown, WIRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    emnmnme wrote: »
    This site is actually very informative on the belief.

    http://geocentricity.com/

    The motivation boils down to 'the Bible cannot be imperfect. If one part of the Bible is wrong, the whole thing is wrong.'

    This makes the assumption that the Bible is not actually a series of books crammed between a single binding written over many years by many different people who weren't all on the same page with each other.

    Gosling on
    I have a new soccer blog The Minnow Tank. Reading it psychically kicks Sepp Blatter in the bean bag.
  • AtomikaAtomika Brought to you by Technicolor™ Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Man, Columbus's trouble convincing people wasn't that he thought the Earth was round it was that he thought it was like a third of the size it actually was (and the greeks proved it to be).

    Columbus was a lucky idiot and the whole tale of daring visionary is so much misinformation because it makes a simpler story.

    I was so, so utterly pissed off when I found that out. Something I'd believed for years, only to find out school just flat out fucking lied to me.

    Well, it does sound better than the truth, though.

    "See, children, Columbus was trying to find a cheaper way to exploit India for European royalty, but everyone back then was too chickenshit to go eastward in a boat, except the Vikings, but we don't talk about them because all they did was loot and pillage the Canadian coast. Anyway, Columbus didn't have a fucking clue where he was going, but was lucky enough to discover the Caribbean, which had something better than cheap peppercorns and cumin: a population of ignorant savages! Thanks to the brave efforts of Columbus, Spain was able to brutally exploit and rape the New World for almost 300 hundred years, bringing annihilation to at least 4 separate millenia-old cultures, not to mention paving the way for further exploitation by the English, French, and Dutch! Which is why you now have a three-day weekend every year to celebrate this fact."

    Atomika on
  • GoslingGosling Looking Up Soccer In Mongolia Right Now, Probably Watertown, WIRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Well, the first step is ceasing to glorify him as a hero. You can portray Columbus as a stupid conquistador while still sparing the kiddies from some of the gorier details.

    I would suggest starting with 'Now, Timmy, he didn't 'discover' anything. The natives were there first.' You can simply say 'enslaved some of the natives' without telling them how he cut off the hands of the natives that didn't find him enough gold. Just get the basic framework introduced and they can ask for details at their leisure.

    Gosling on
    I have a new soccer blog The Minnow Tank. Reading it psychically kicks Sepp Blatter in the bean bag.
  • AtomikaAtomika Brought to you by Technicolor™ Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Gosling wrote: »
    Well, the first step is ceasing to glorify him as a hero. You can portray Columbus as a stupid conquistador while still sparing the kiddies from some of the gorier details.

    I would suggest starting with 'Now, Timmy, he didn't 'discover' anything. The natives were there first.' You can simply say 'enslaved some of the natives' without telling them how he cut off the hands of the natives that didn't find him enough gold. Just get the basic framework introduced and they can ask for details at their leisure.

    Exactly. If we could just make sure that Columbus is no longer taught as, "The Guy Who Discovered America!," that would be a good start.

    For young kids, I would settle for, "The Guy Who Accidentally Discovered The Bahamas While He Was Looking For India."

    Atomika on
  • tehmarkentehmarken BrooklynRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Actually, to his credit, I don't think Columbus enslaved many natives. He did however kill a bunch intentionally to take their land and resources, and many other were unintentionally killed by disease. Europeans had a lot more disease and immunities built up than the natives, so when a flu was brought over that didn't do much more than a days bedrest to Europeans, it wiped out a few million native americans.

    tehmarken on
  • CervetusCervetus Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    tehmarken wrote: »
    Actually, to his credit, I don't think Columbus enslaved many natives. He did however kill a bunch intentionally to take their land and resources, and many other were unintentionally killed by disease. Europeans had a lot more disease and immunities built up than the natives, so when a flu was brought over that didn't do much more than a days bedrest to Europeans, it wiped out a few million native americans.


    http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/1017/p05s01-woeu.html
    Columbus was also a strong supporter of slavery, refusing to baptize the indigenous people of Hispaniola so that he could enslave them (Spanish law prohibited the enslavement of Christians), and auctioning Spaniards into slavery, including a young boy caught stealing, as punishment.

    He was basically an asshole in every way possible.

    Cervetus on
    The libertarian response to anything is, "Sure, that works fine in practice, but it doesn't fly in theory."
  • EWomEWom Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    emnmnme wrote: »
    DoctorArch wrote: »
    Things like this make me sad, because there are a multitude of people out there when confronted with this bullcrap will go "Well, let's see, you have a good point, but..." when the proper response is "I'm sorry, you're either stupid or willfully ignorant."

    Were you in orbit watching the earth move!? Were you there!? No, you weren't, you're just blindly following your textbooks.

    ***SNIP***

    *skip to 21:00*

    I love it how this guy is wearing a lab coat.

    It's as though he realises he needs to look scientific to be taken seriously.... So that he can disprove everything science has ever said ever.

    A lab coat, and a tie with a dinosaur. And his entire argument is based off of "LOL u werent ther! only god knowz"

    We have a group show up at our county fair every year and they get a booth and they do combination of screaming and preaching about how the world is only 6,000 years old, and how jesus didn't ride a donkey but rode around on dinosaurs, because dinosaurs and people were around at the same time. Their evidence for this is that there is a beetle that produces two chemicals , and when it shoots them out its ass they mix and burn things. This means, obviously that there were dragons, and if there were dragons, then there were also dinosaurs who let people ride them around.

    In addition, every single religious belief that has ever been around, came after Christianity and is just trying to copy it to make a quick buck.


    People like this should be considered terrorists, they are waging war on the US and their weapon is stupidity.

    EWom on
    Whether they find a life there or not, I think Jupiter should be called an enemy planet.
  • tehmarkentehmarken BrooklynRegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    The only thing missing is him embezzling royal families.

    tehmarken on
  • Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Ho Ho Ho Disconnecting from Xbox LIVERegistered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Dude, not cool.

    Why? It's a completely irrational thing to say. Just because there's an overwhelming popular attachment to an irrational philosophy doesn't negate its irrationality.

    Belief in god doesn't make people 'intellectually deficient'. And saying so kind of makes the speaker a silly goose. About the least effective way to win people over is to call them stupid and condescend to them.

    Just sayin'.

    Santa Claustrophobia on
  • Zilla360Zilla360 21st Century. |She/Her| Surreal. Immersive. Earth.Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Dude, not cool.

    Why? It's a completely irrational thing to say. Just because there's an overwhelming popular attachment to an irrational philosophy doesn't negate its irrationality.

    Belief in god doesn't make people 'intellectually deficient'. And saying so kind of makes the speaker a silly goose. About the least effective way to win people over is to call them stupid and condescend to them.

    Just sayin'.
    "Religion is a great force — the only real motive force in the world; but what you fellows don't understand is that you must get at a man through his own religion and not through yours. Instead of facing that fact, you persist in trying to convert all men to your own little sect, so that you can use it against them afterwards. You are all missionaries and proselytizers trying to uproot the native religion from your neighbour's flowerbeds and plant your own in its place. You would rather let a child perish in ignorance than have it taught by a rival sectary. You can talk to me of the quintessential equality of coal merchants and British officers; and yet you can't see the quintessential equality of all the religions. " - George Bernard Shaw.

    Zilla360 on
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  • ElitistbElitistb Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Dude, not cool.

    Why? It's a completely irrational thing to say. Just because there's an overwhelming popular attachment to an irrational philosophy doesn't negate its irrationality.

    Belief in god doesn't make people 'intellectually deficient'. And saying so kind of makes the speaker a silly goose. About the least effective way to win people over is to call them stupid and condescend to them.

    Just sayin'.
    So long as you say the exact same thing about every belief ever invented (such as ice cream and computers go great together, spoon it right in), you are not being hypocritical.

    That is my dick answer.

    My non dick answer is:

    Being irrational simply means they are being irrational and has no bearing on their intellectual prowess.

    Elitistb on
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  • AtomikaAtomika Brought to you by Technicolor™ Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Elitistb wrote: »
    Being irrational simply means they are being irrational and has no bearing on their intellectual prowess.

    Prowess? No. Practical ability? Indubitably.

    Most religious people are capable of being objective and reasonable, until objectivity and logic get in the way of pre-established values containing magical thought.

    In those instances, the result is virtually similar to what you would receive from a wholly irrational and ignorant person, so I see little reason to treat it differently.

    If a man put his hand in a fire because he was stupid, or if he put it in a fire because he figured God would protect him, the hand is burnt either way.

    Atomika on
  • Technicus RexTechnicus Rex All your base.Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Dude, not cool.

    Why? It's a completely irrational thing to say. Just because there's an overwhelming popular attachment to an irrational philosophy doesn't negate its irrationality.

    Belief in god doesn't make people 'intellectually deficient'. And saying so kind of makes the speaker a silly goose. About the least effective way to win people over is to call them stupid and condescend to them.

    Just sayin'.

    I know this. I wouldn't say it out loud to someone without considering the future social effects.

    I'm not shy about sharing my opinions on the subject though.

    Technicus Rex on
    People like Coldplay and voted for the Nazi's. You can't trust people. - Super Hans.
  • ElitistbElitistb Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    If a man put his hand in a fire because he was stupid, or if he put it in a fire because he figured God would protect him, the hand is burnt either way.
    Indeed, the hand is burnt either way, but the stupid man will hopefully learn not to put his hand in the fire anymore.

    Elitistb on
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  • AtomikaAtomika Brought to you by Technicolor™ Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Elitistb wrote: »
    If a man put his hand in a fire because he was stupid, or if he put it in a fire because he figured God would protect him, the hand is burnt either way.
    Indeed, the hand is burnt either way, but the stupid man will hopefully learn not to put his hand in the fire anymore.

    Exactly.

    At least the inherent implication with someone who is stupid is that they're capable of learning or at least basing future judgments on prior experiences. Religion, on the other hand, more closely clinically presents as insanity.

    Atomika on
  • CantidoCantido Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Elitistb wrote: »
    If a man put his hand in a fire because he was stupid, or if he put it in a fire because he figured God would protect him, the hand is burnt either way.
    Indeed, the hand is burnt either way, but the stupid man will hopefully learn not to put his hand in the fire anymore.

    Exactly.

    At least the inherent implication with someone who is stupid is that they're capable of learning or at least basing future judgments on prior experiences. Religion, on the other hand, more closely clinically presents as insanity.

    The funny thing is, such an act is called "Tempting God", and is considered a sin.

    That is, putting yourself in a situation and expecting/demanding God to miracle you out of it to prove he's real. This ties in with the anti-vaccine geese too.

    Cantido on
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  • HevachHevach Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    gotta love it when a specific group of Christians try to disprove science. these guys must be so insecure to make shit up like this,\.

    You see that bolded part right there? That's really important. In the same way that not all Muslims are fanatics, not all Christians are absurdly stupid.

    People say this a lot, but it's not really a valid comparison because of sheer scale.

    The most recent numbers I've seen for the US have 45% believing the entire world was created according to Genesis within the last 10,000 years in mostly it's present form, and even more (55%) believing man was created from nothing in his present form within a similar timeframe. Numbers that have stayed pretty much the same since the 1920's.

    Those numbers are from 2004 and 2006. Comparing to 2008 numbers, 76% of the US is Christian (less than 2% more belong to other religions that also include Genesis). Meaning on the order of 70% of Christians are creationists, 60% the young earth variety... This is higher than the percentage of Christians who actively attend church services.

    Not only that, but that 70% is growing - while Christians have dropped from nearly 90% of Americans, creationism has held steady. Just going back to 1990 numbers, only about 65% of Christians were creationists.

    It's pretty unfair to both sides of the argument to compare 70% of Christians in the country to fanatical Muslims, in their single digit percentages, or to write them off as a backwoods curiosity.

    Hevach on
  • Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Dude, not cool.

    Why? It's a completely irrational thing to say. Just because there's an overwhelming popular attachment to an irrational philosophy doesn't negate its irrationality.

    Belief in god doesn't make people 'intellectually deficient'. And saying so kind of makes the speaker a silly goose. About the least effective way to win people over is to call them stupid and condescend to them.

    Just sayin'.
    There are many highly intelligent and educated people who are also very religious. Most of us would probably be shredded by the average Rabbi in a debate. And the braintrust of the Catholic Church makes the average Ivy League professor look like a slightly dim teenager.

    Sure, there are plenty of dumb religious people. But there are also plenty of dumb atheists and non-religious folks.

    Modern Man on
    Aetian Jupiter - 41 Gunslinger - The Old Republic
    Rigorous Scholarship

  • Mr_RoseMr_Rose 83 Blue Ridge Protects the Holy Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Also fun; the deep and ironic arrogance of the "I can't figure it out therefore goddidit" stance implicit in most creationist arguments; specifically that the questioner is so incredibly smart that the only thing that could have made something they personally can't understand is (their) god. Especially since these morons mostly use teh interwubs to spread their crazy.

    Of course, not much of this applies specifically to geocentrism, but I do note a similar flavour of arrogance in their pronouncements...

    Mr_Rose on
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  • Jealous DevaJealous Deva Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Hamurabi wrote: »
    Anyone want an equally scary, non-religious version of this thought?

    The anti-vaccination movement.

    Scary, scary shit.

    My grandmother knew people who died of Measles!

    Depending on the demographics, this is still a Real Thing.

    I also know at least one young person who doesn't get vaccinated because he had a reaction to a flu shot and got sick.

    I'm talking about the crazies who don't believe they are necessary or cause Autism.
    Some vaccines aren't really all that necessary anymore. But that's because we've basically wiped out the relevant diseases through past mass vaccinations of the population. I got the smallpox vaccine when I was a kid, but that's because I was born in Eastern Europe. I don't know of any Americans my age or younger who received that vaccine.

    Smallpox is pretty definitively gone as far as I know.

    People don't get vaccinated for polio in western countries anymore, but I think isolated regions of Asia still have outbreaks every now and again?

    EDIT: The Australian vaccination schedule also doesn't include the Hep A vaccination, even though it exists - apparently because it's hard to contract and needs a lot of repeats to remain effective?

    Hep A infection is both generally non-life threatening (most cases don't even display noticable symptoms, fatality is rare), rare, and is in some cases actually beneficial (Hep A seems to have a side effect of preventing development of some allergies and lung conditions). Its generally not immunized against unless someone is in a high-risk environment. (infancy being considered to be a high risk environment in some areas because frankly young children are gross and vulnerable to spreading things around to each other via fecal-oral transmission).

    Jealous Deva on
  • PolloDiabloPolloDiablo Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    All I know is that seen from a satellite in a geostationary orbit, the Earth doesn't rotate at all. Explain that shit, science.

    PolloDiablo on
    Be excellent to each other you stupid cunts.
  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    All I know is that seen from a satellite in a geostationary orbit, the Earth doesn't rotate at all. Explain that shit, science.

    It's the Obama administration. You're heard the expression, "Money makes the world go 'round"? Well, his socialist policies are preventing the earth from turning. Vote Huckabee/Beck in 2012.

    emnmnme on
  • autono-wally, erotibot300autono-wally, erotibot300 love machine Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    emnmnme wrote: »
    This site is actually very informative on the belief.

    http://geocentricity.com/

    The motivation boils down to 'the Bible cannot be imperfect. If one part of the Bible is wrong, the whole thing is wrong.'

    I think I got their problem..

    autono-wally, erotibot300 on
    kFJhXwE.jpgkFJhXwE.jpg
  • oldsakoldsak Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    All I know is that seen from a satellite in a geostationary orbit, the Earth doesn't rotate at all. Explain that shit, science.

    Psh. You and your fancy sky demons. All you need to do is look up and you can clearly see that the sun revolves around the earth

    oldsak on
  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Let's look at a younger target audience.

    1) Go to this link http://www.famquest.com/vbstpcharacters.html
    2) Download the free sample pack
    3) Open the sample pack and skip down to the dialog for the puppet show

    A 6 year old cannot argue with the logic in the play. 'Fish have fish babies and that disproves evolution' combined with the message coming from an authority figure is a one-two knockout punch. They're convinced. Note that the character 'Doc' is also wearing a lab coat.

    emnmnme on
  • Styrofoam SammichStyrofoam Sammich WANT. 5386-8443-8937Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    emnmnme wrote: »
    Let's look at a younger target audience.

    1) Go to this link http://www.famquest.com/vbstpcharacters.html
    2) Download the free sample pack
    3) Open the sample pack and skip down to the dialog for the puppet show

    A 6 year old cannot argue with the logic in the play. 'Fish have fish babies and that disproves evolution' combined with the message coming from an authority figure is a one-two knockout punch. They're convinced. Note that the character 'Doc' is also wearing a lab coat.
    Doc is a creation scientist who knows that God created our universe just as it says in the Bible, and that science is simply the study of how this wonderful world works
    Dr. Deceit fills the role of attempting to teach the kids the so-called "proven facts" of the beginnings of the universe and evolution as Doc works to set the record straight.

    When I was a little kid our daycare took us all to a VBS thing with 1 day heads up for the parents, my parents were pissed.

    Styrofoam Sammich on
  • madnedmadned Registered User
    edited September 2010
    a star turtle would clearly need seaturtle-like flippers to facilitate space travel

    no it wouldn't.

    turtles all the way down :P

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turtles_all_the_way_down

    madned on
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