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Harper Politics: Opposition Mustache, Iggy-popped

RobmanRobman Registered User regular
edited May 2011 in Debate and/or Discourse
octoharper%2521.jpg

TRY AND STOP ME

Robman on
«13456763

Posts

  • enlightenedbumenlightenedbum Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Who would be PM if you guys elected the Canadian national team? Yzerman for putting it together, Crosby for scoring the gold winning goal, or Luongo? Or Rick Nash for being a murderbeast in the Olympics?

    I kid because I love. Good luck being smarter than us, Canada.

    enlightenedbum on
    Herbert Hoover got 40% of the vote in 1932. Friendly reminder.
  • blkmageblkmage Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Journalist talk on twitter is suggesting that things may not be so hot for the Liberals in Newfoundland and Labrador now that Danny Williams isn't around anymore to get angry at the federal Conservatives. There's this along with the new premier letting her caucus campaign with the Conservatives.

    blkmage on
  • quovadis13quovadis13 Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    No way in hell do I want Chris Pronger running this country. That guy is a major douche.

    quovadis13 on
  • AegisAegis Not Quite TorontoRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I'd normally ask if that's really a picture of Layton, but the 'stache just doesn't lie.

    Aegis on
    We'll see how long this blog lasts
    Currently DMing: None :(
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  • RikushixRikushix Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    You fools, this is our future PM:

    dryden_ken_1.jpg

    Also I'm more than a little appalled by that picture of Layton.

    Rikushix on
    StKbT.jpg
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Layton is a red-shirt eh?

    There's a joke here about elections, away-missions and who never comes back [strike]alive[/strike]as PM.

    shryke on
  • Torso BoyTorso Boy Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    OP contains the word "election" once, but "secret," and "gay cowboy" each twice.

    The honourable leader of the opposition is depicted the same number of times as Uhura.

    8/10. Needs more pictures of Jack Layton, though.

    Torso Boy on
    Rent wrote: »
    So that's what having no idea what you are talking about looks like
  • LoklarLoklar Registered User
    edited March 2011
    Torso Boy wrote: »
    OP contains the word "election" once, but "secret," and "gay cowboy" each twice.

    The honourable leader of the opposition is depicted the same number of times as Uhura.

    8/10. Needs more pictures of Jack Layton, though.

    jack-layton1.jpg?w=300&h=200

    Loklar on
  • JeanJean Soon to be papa bear Gatineau, QuébecRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Who would be PM if you guys elected the Canadian national team? Yzerman for putting it together, Crosby for scoring the gold winning goal, or Luongo? Or Rick Nash for being a murderbeast in the Olympics?

    I kid because I love. Good luck being smarter than us, Canada.

    Crosby for PM, Toews as second in command. Joe Sakic and Mario Lemieux as advisers. Can't go wrong with that.

    Jean on
    "You won't destroy us, You won't destroy our democracy. We are a small but proud nation. No one can bomb us to silence. No one can scare us from being Norway. This evening and tonight, we'll take care of each other. That's what we do best when attacked'' - Jens Stoltenberg
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Good news everyone! My brother is no longer voting Conservative!

    You ask what scandal, what abuse, what horrible dishonourable act Harper committed that cost him the support of the last, ultra-conservative member of my family?
    He made federal post-doctoral grants taxable. He created a new tax on my brother's only and previously non-taxable source of income. The only reason my brother is no longer voting Conservative is because they raised taxes his taxes.

    Still, don't look a gift horse in the mouth, I guess.

    Richy on
    sig.gif
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    You should probably punch that gift-horse in the mouth though.

    Just don't look while you are doing it.

    shryke on
  • enlightenedbumenlightenedbum Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Richy, are you sure he's not an adopted American? We have lots of those.

    enlightenedbum on
    Herbert Hoover got 40% of the vote in 1932. Friendly reminder.
  • ueanuean Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    A link on facebook just told me I agree with the politik of 57% of the Liberals, 55% Conservative, 54% NDP, 53% Green Party, and 26% BlocQ.

    Either that survey is busted or I've got some serious issues come voting time.

    Throw another 10% at the NDP for that Ensign Layton photo at the top.

    uean on
    Guys? Hay guys?
    PSN - sumowot
  • JeanJean Soon to be papa bear Gatineau, QuébecRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    uean wrote: »
    A link on facebook just told me I agree with the politik of 57% of the Liberals, 55% Conservative, 54% NDP, 53% Green Party, and 26% BlocQ.

    Either that survey is busted or I've got some serious issues come voting time.

    Throw another 10% at the NDP for that Ensign Layton photo at the top.

    Care to share that link with us? I'd be curious to see what my results are.

    Jean on
    "You won't destroy us, You won't destroy our democracy. We are a small but proud nation. No one can bomb us to silence. No one can scare us from being Norway. This evening and tonight, we'll take care of each other. That's what we do best when attacked'' - Jens Stoltenberg
  • hippofanthippofant ティンク Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Richy wrote: »
    Good news everyone! My brother is no longer voting Conservative!

    You ask what scandal, what abuse, what horrible dishonourable act Harper committed that cost him the support of the last, ultra-conservative member of my family?
    He made federal post-doctoral grants taxable. He created a new tax on my brother's only and previously non-taxable source of income. The only reason my brother is no longer voting Conservative is because they raised taxes his taxes.

    Still, don't look a gift horse in the mouth, I guess.

    Silly question, but why would his income not be taxable? What justification for that could there be, since we poor grad students have taxable incomes too? (They just become exempt due to the low value, plus tuition deductions.) There was a lovely editorial in the Toronto Star recently that basically exemplified my "small government" beliefs... let me see...

    Ah, here. Fiscal favours are eroding our tax system:
    It is not easy to justify giving fiscal favours to some groups over others. Doing so erodes one of the most fundamental principles of our tax system: that people in similar circumstances should bear similar tax burdens. Known to policy wonks as “horizontal equity,” it is a key to ensuring that the system is not only fair but is seen as fair by those who must comply with it.

    At first glance, this newest slate of tax goodies looks benign. Who could argue with a little tax relief for volunteer firefighters or children’s art? In isolation this makes sense. But zoom out a little, and it’s not clear why we should tax one group of volunteers more heavily than another. Fighting fires is a hugely important contribution but is it more deserving of tax relief than volunteering to provide disaster relief, to build houses for homeless families or to teach new Canadians to read? ...

    Many of the tax expenditures in this budget seem like they are meant to help those in great need.... Once again, appearances can be misleading. All of these new credits are “non-refundable,” meaning they benefit only those with enough income to pay taxes. This leaves out a surprisingly large chunk of the population.

    The latest data available from the Canada Revenue Agency show that in 2009, almost 34 per cent of individuals who filed returns had no tax payable (28 per cent of men; 39 per cent of women). That means the new credits are of no help whatsoever to a full third of tax filers, most of them at the bottom of the earnings scale.

    In reality, these concessions are targeted to middle and upper earners. Perhaps we do want to help these folks with their tuition, care giving or medical expenses, but it makes little sense to exclude the neediest citizens from these programs. Yet this is so often the effect of delivering subsidies through the tax system.

    Who will evaluate the impact of these new tax expenditures to see if they are encouraging more Canadians to pursue post-secondary education or volunteer firefighting, or have other salutary effects that help to justify their costs? Most likely no one, ever. Once enacted into law, these special rules will sit in the tax code indefinitely with no need to be examined or reapproved the way a direct spending program would be.

    Lisa Philipps is a professor of tax law and policy at Osgoode Hall Law School of York University, and co-editor with Neil Brooks and Jinyan Li of Tax Expenditures: State of the Art.

    And the increasing complexity of the tax code, firstly drives up our societal expenditures on collection and administration, and secondly opens up loopholes:

    Goar: Creative use of tax loophole blunts injustice
    Touched by their generosity, but reluctant to pocket their money, Stapleton came up with an ingenious scheme. He would do what the high rollers did. First, he would turn his one-man consultancy into a “corporation.”

    Next he would deposit his friends’ contributions in a special fund. Then his corporation would use the fund to buy “flow through” shares, then donate them to charity. As its sole owner, he would be eligible for a tax credit worth 95 per cent of the donation. The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals — the charity chosen by the woman he helped — would get a windfall.

    hippofant on
  • Descendant XDescendant X Hank Facepunch Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Robman wrote: »

    I fucking hate my riding. Our MP is stepping down and the polls are still fixed for the Conservative candidate.

    [looks at story re: conservative candidate]

    Oh FUCK ME.

    He went to Trinity Western University.

    This guy is gonna be a total fucking train wreck if he wins the seat.

    Descendant X on
    Something used to be here. It's gone now.
  • AzioAzio Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I missed this while I was in New York City, and with a federal election going on I dont know if it came up in the previous thread. But apparently the Reform party alumnus and former Conservative MP for Delta-Richmond, John Cummins, has announced his candidacy for leadership of the BC Conservative Party. He claims that he hates Gordon Campbell and the BC Libs so much that he voted NDP in the 2009 election. He also dismissed concerns about vote splitting on the right, saying that there are right wing non-voters who would go for a revitalized Tory party, led by him of course. Also some ominous stuff about "common sense". He is clearly not a fan of the Harper-era Conservative beast. I hope it goes well for him, ie just well enough to give us a 10 year NDP majority with a split opposition.

    Azio on
  • AzioAzio Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Robman wrote: »

    I fucking hate my riding. Our MP is stepping down and the polls are still fixed for the Conservative candidate.

    [looks at story re: conservative candidate]

    Oh FUCK ME.

    He went to Trinity Western University.

    This guy is gonna be a total fucking train wreck if he wins the seat.

    Yeah no big surprise there. Cummins fancied himself a maverick so he's being replaced with a docile backbencher who will do as he's told without complaint. They took all of one week to pick the new candidate so they obviously want a stooge to represent us, not a real politician. Also this place is full of senile old people, petit-bourgeois baby boomers and stupid unengaged teenagers who don't vote. I you want to help the NDP or the Liberals federally your best bet is to volunteer for a campaign in Vancouver Centre or Surrey where the races are closer.

    Azio on
  • hippofanthippofant ティンク Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Oh Jesus Christ, one of my friends is running for the Greens. Given that he's going to get crushed, am I obligated to help him canvass and shit, under the principle of "put up or shut up"?

    hippofant on
  • ueanuean Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Jean wrote: »
    uean wrote: »
    A link on facebook just told me I agree with the politik of 57% of the Liberals, 55% Conservative, 54% NDP, 53% Green Party, and 26% BlocQ.

    Either that survey is busted or I've got some serious issues come voting time.

    Throw another 10% at the NDP for that Ensign Layton photo at the top.

    Care to share that link with us? I'd be curious to see what my results are.

    http://federal.votecompass.ca

    edit - you won't get the percentage points unless you take it without flash, like I did on my phone

    uean on
    Guys? Hay guys?
    PSN - sumowot
  • RikushixRikushix Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Azio wrote: »
    Robman wrote: »

    I fucking hate my riding. Our MP is stepping down and the polls are still fixed for the Conservative candidate.

    [looks at story re: conservative candidate]

    Oh FUCK ME.

    He went to Trinity Western University.

    This guy is gonna be a total fucking train wreck if he wins the seat.

    Yeah no big surprise there. Cummins fancied himself a maverick so he's being replaced with a docile backbencher who will do as he's told without complaint. They took all of one week to pick the new candidate so they obviously want a stooge to represent us, not a real politician. Also this place is full of senile old people, petit-bourgeois baby boomers and stupid unengaged teenagers who don't vote. I you want to help the NDP or the Liberals federally your best bet is to volunteer for a campaign in Vancouver Centre or Surrey where the races are closer.

    Wait. Are you from his riding? I grew up in Richmond and Ladner, Cummins has always struck me as pretty uninspired. He gets the votes from the farmhouse geriatrics in Delta, much the same way that Lois Jackson repeatedly wins as Mayor of Delta because North Delta overpowers Ladner and Tsawwassen.

    I've always been leery of anyone who was deeply involved with the Alliance Party. Chiefly because it was the Stockwell Day Show when I was in elementary and middle school and we got to see all sorts of ridiculous zealotry and xenophobia.

    edit: I should point out that Cummins is pretty well qualified. He has a diverse background. But it's clear where and why he gets his votes and how he keeps getting re-elected.

    Rikushix on
    StKbT.jpg
  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I live in James Moore's riding. I pretty much might was well not vote. :/

    Corvus on
    :so_raven:
  • Descendant XDescendant X Hank Facepunch Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Azio wrote: »
    Robman wrote: »

    I fucking hate my riding. Our MP is stepping down and the polls are still fixed for the Conservative candidate.

    [looks at story re: conservative candidate]

    Oh FUCK ME.

    He went to Trinity Western University.

    This guy is gonna be a total fucking train wreck if he wins the seat.

    Yeah no big surprise there. Cummins fancied himself a maverick so he's being replaced with a docile backbencher who will do as he's told without complaint. They took all of one week to pick the new candidate so they obviously want a stooge to represent us, not a real politician. Also this place is full of senile old people, petit-bourgeois baby boomers and stupid unengaged teenagers who don't vote. I you want to help the NDP or the Liberals federally your best bet is to volunteer for a campaign in Vancouver Centre or Surrey where the races are closer.

    Heh. Wrong riding.

    I'm actually in Prince George-Peace River. Pat Bell was our MP for what seemed like aeons until he finally stepped down.

    The main positive of him leaving is that we've stopped getting leaflets about how everything is going to go to hell in a handbasket unless we get tough on crime.

    EDIT: Is there a site anywhere that could tell me voter turnout? I'm going to be a broken record on Facebook trying to get everyone I know out to vote, even if it is for the Cons.

    EDIT2: Found a map. Turns out only 48% of the assholes in my riding bothered to vote in 2008.

    Descendant X on
    Something used to be here. It's gone now.
  • JeanJean Soon to be papa bear Gatineau, QuébecRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    For those interested : Jack Layton will be on tout le monde en parle at the SRC (french CBC) this Sunday, 7PM EST.

    This show regularly gets over 1 million watchers so if he does well it could really help him.

    Jean on
    "You won't destroy us, You won't destroy our democracy. We are a small but proud nation. No one can bomb us to silence. No one can scare us from being Norway. This evening and tonight, we'll take care of each other. That's what we do best when attacked'' - Jens Stoltenberg
  • RikushixRikushix Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Michael Ignatieff was at Langara yesterday - I missed him but I saw the CBC and CTV vans and both chartered busses :P

    Rikushix on
    StKbT.jpg
  • AzioAzio Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Rikushix wrote: »
    Wait. Are you from his riding? I grew up in Richmond and Ladner, Cummins has always struck me as pretty uninspired. He gets the votes from the farmhouse geriatrics in Delta, much the same way that Lois Jackson repeatedly wins as Mayor of Delta because North Delta overpowers Ladner and Tsawwassen.

    I've always been leery of anyone who was deeply involved with the Alliance Party. Chiefly because it was the Stockwell Day Show when I was in elementary and middle school and we got to see all sorts of ridiculous zealotry and xenophobia.

    edit: I should point out that Cummins is pretty well qualified. He has a diverse background. But it's clear where and why he gets his votes and how he keeps getting re-elected.
    He was a Reform guy back when Preston Manning ran the show. Day and Harper have a much different agenda than Preston Manning and I don't think Cummins is a fan. But who knows, maybe he is just an opportunist.
    Heh. Wrong riding.

    I'm actually in Prince George-Peace River. Pat Bell was our MP for what seemed like aeons until he finally stepped down.
    Oh, sorry. My mistake. I just assumed you were talking about Kerry-Lynne Findlay, the new new candidate for Delta-Richmond. She has a BA in history from UBC.

    The previous replacement candidate, Dale Saip, was fired over his troubled financial history. He filed for creditor protection in 1993, and in 2005 he had to cut a deal with Canada Revenue over $90,000 in unpaid taxes. When this became public the Tories fired him. Well it turns out that Findlay, his replacement, has also had to file for bankruptcy in the past. It doesn't look like they're going to fire her over it though. What the fuck. The worst part is she'll probably win because this place is a fucking suburban shithole that is named after the type of geographical feature it sits on.

    Azio on
  • RikushixRikushix Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Yeah I should have clarified and said I know that Cummins was definitely on the Reform/PC side of things as opposed to Alliance. I know he's not happy with the way Harper has led the country.

    Rikushix on
    StKbT.jpg
  • ThisThis Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I wonder how much of a hassle it would be to vote from Australia.

    This on
  • AzioAzio Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    If you are eligible to vote in a federal general election, you can do it from anywhere in the world using this form.

    Eligible means that you:
    have lived in Canada before applying for registration
    have been living outside Canada for less than five consecutive years immediately before applying, and
    intend to return to live in Canada.

    Do it right now because it could take a while for them to process it.

    Azio on
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    hippofant wrote: »
    Silly question, but why would his income not be taxable? What justification for that could there be, since we poor grad students have taxable incomes too? (They just become exempt due to the low value, plus tuition deductions.)

    Well, his income here is not a salary, it's a research grant. Those are paid out by the Federal government to support research (in this case by supporting a researcher directly, but also more generally by purchasing equipment, paying for conferences, etc.). Having the Federal government tax it means they're taking back part of the money they gave us. In essence, it's a disguised research funding cut.

    Richy on
    sig.gif
  • Disco11Disco11 Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Well that's essentially what they do with EI. Sucks for him no doubt but if the thousands on EI have too....

    Disco11 on
    PSN: Canadian_llama
  • hippofanthippofant ティンク Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Richy wrote: »
    hippofant wrote: »
    Silly question, but why would his income not be taxable? What justification for that could there be, since we poor grad students have taxable incomes too? (They just become exempt due to the low value, plus tuition deductions.)

    Well, his income here is not a salary, it's a research grant. Those are paid out by the Federal government to support research (in this case by supporting a researcher directly, but also more generally by purchasing equipment, paying for conferences, etc.). Having the Federal government tax it means they're taking back part of the money they gave us. In essence, it's a disguised research funding cut.

    Mmm. I guess. I suppose if I got an NSERC grant, that would be untaxable... except the department would claw back almost all of it anyways.

    But it's not quite a funding cut, because he can deduct from it. Depending on his situation, it might not even affect him at all, since, as the link I posted above noted, a third of Canadians don't even pay any income tax post-deductions.

    hippofant on
  • oldmankenoldmanken Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    blkmage wrote: »
    Journalist talk on twitter is suggesting that things may not be so hot for the Liberals in Newfoundland and Labrador now that Danny Williams isn't around anymore to get angry at the federal Conservatives. There's this along with the new premier letting her caucus campaign with the Conservatives.

    It's a tough one to call, but a couple of things gives me hope.

    Let's lay down a couple of things, just to get you more familiar with the lay of the land. I would say that realistically, the Conservatives only have a shot at picking up two seats in NL... Avalon and St. John's South/Mount Pearl. Some might argue that Random/Burin/St. George's might be in play as well, but I don't really think so.

    Looking at the safe seats, Gerry Byrne in Humber/St. Barbe/Baie Verte is a beast, and will only not get elected unless he has some massive scandal or suddenly decides he couldn't be arsed. He's running against Trevor Taylor, who is a former provincial cabinet minister, but who is also a giant douche and useless (I know first hand, having dealt with him and his office while working for an MHA). Jack Harris in St. John's East, my riding, is also equally insurmountable. Scott Simms is slightly less of a lock, but again, I can't see him losing his seat in Bonavista/Gander/Grand Falls/Windsor.

    I feel Judy Foote in Random/Burin/St. George's is safe as well, though she is going up against what I would consider a heavy hitter in John Ottenheimer. He's a former provincial cabinet minister, with a far better reputation for competence than Trevor Taylor, so he'll likely give Foote a run for her money. She'll still win, but it will be closer than the previous election.

    Some Conservatives are thinking that they can pick up Labrador, but they must be smoking some powerful drugs. Todd Russell is not going to lose that seat, which has been dominated by the Liberals since 1988 when it was created. He's especially not going to lose it to Peter Penashue, who has needed to flip-flop on pretty much all of his positions in order to gain the Conservative nomination, and who probably can no longer guarantee the Innu vote. Add to that a broken promise regarding increasing the military presence at 5 Wing Goose Bay, a stupid promise that nobody could have fulfilled, and even a guaranteed loan for the Lower Churchill project will not be enough to gain any traction.

    Where it could gain traction is in the two ridings that could conceivably be under threat. A promise of money for a big project can certainly help, especially in the most urban areas of the province that have no direct exposure to the negative impacts of said project. You add in that the provincial Tories are now getting behind their federal counterparts, and you'll have two very competitive races in St. John's South/Mount Pearl and Avalon.

    I personally think that Avalon is the least under threat. Fabian Manning resigned his Senate seat in order to run for the Conservatives, and is a very strong candidate. Scott Andrews, the Liberal MP, isn't as strong as the other Liberal members in the province, but he has a few good things going for him. He's the incumbent, which counts for more than a few percent, and he hasn't really rocked the boat. Manning had a chance at the seat last time around, and they didn't want him then. Avalon being a half rural riding, the fisheries are important as well, and DFO just made a pretty awful announcement today regarding the shrimp quotas. They are trying to keep it quiet, and will not comment on it, but they are reducing the inshore quota by 40% and the offshore quota by 10%... meaning the biggest reduction will come in areas that have to process the shrimp in province. If Andrews is smart, he'll hammer this as another decision by the 'Harper government' that doesn't look out for the interests of Newfoundland.

    The fisheries stuff could also hurt Loyola Sullivan's chances in St. John's South/Mount Pearl, but not to the same extent because it is an urban riding. He was the Ambassador for Fisheries Conservation, which makes him vulnerable on the subject, but there are not enough fisheries tied votes in the riding. What makes the riding a tossup is that there are three very strong candidates. Siobhan Coady is the Liberal incumbent, and has all the advantages that entails. However, she only won by 3.3% against the NDP candidate, Ryan Cleary, in the last election, and he's running again this time. Which creates a situation where the non-Conservative vote can be diluted between the two parties, and Loyola Sullivan could pull it out as a result. It's going to be a hell of an interesting race, and will be one of the first close one to have results in.

    Anyway, long winded I know, but that's my take. I'm thinking the Conservatives will still get shut out, but won't be surprised if they pick up a seat in St. John's. Just don't underestimate the residual animosity towards the Harper government.

    oldmanken on
  • saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    That's an awesome post, dude. Thanks for that. I've found that the national English media is really quite shit at covering what is happening politically on the ground anywhere outside of Ontario or maybe Alberta. I imagine it's as bad for Newfoundland as it is here in B.C.

    Anyway, Chantal Hébert's latest column argues against including Elizabeth May in the debates.

    http://www.thestar.com/article/966062--hebert-why-elizabeth-may-doesn-t-belong-in-election-debates
    The television consortium’s decision to exclude Green Party Leader Elizabeth May from the election campaign debates is an accurate reflection of her party’s diminishing contribution to the national conversation and the debatable relevance of her debut appearance at the same table in 2008.

    It may also be the best thing that could have happened to her at this early stage in the campaign; the Green Party of Canada was otherwise at great risk of spending it completely on the sidelines.

    Until the networks’ decision prompted a predictable social media firestorm, many voters might have been forgiven for having forgotten the existence of the Green party and its feisty leader.

    Since the last election, the party has had more presence in the polls than in the daily life of the nation.

    Part of the reason for that has to do with the relative disappearance of the climate change issue from the federal radar.

    The recession combined with a Liberal realignment on other policy fronts have pushed the environment down the list of top-of-mind issues on Parliament Hill.

    While the Green party insists that it is about more than the environment, that remains its marquee issue.

    But a lower national profile is also the price to pay for May’s decision to focus on winning a British Columbia seat for herself in this election. Running a local campaign three time zones away from Parliament Hill is a different proposition from leading a national parade.

    The consortium’s decision to exclude May is based on what seems to many like a technicality —that the Greens are no longer represented in the Commons — but it was on the basis of their parties’ actual presence in the House that Preston Manning and Lucien Bouchard were included in the 1993 debates.

    At the time neither the Bloc Québécois nor the Reform Party ran candidates across the country but both came out of the 1993 campaign with more MPs than two of the three traditional parties.

    In the following election, it would have been hard to shut out a party like the Bloc because it did not run candidates across the country while the NDP and the Tories, who no longer commanded enough MPs to be officially recognized as parties in the House of Commons, were back on the podium.

    As of that period, the nature of the election debates changed and some would argue that they took a turn for the worse.

    It is an understatement to say that the 2008 debates inspired more frustration than enlightenment and May — among others — contributed to their failure.

    She spent less time showcasing what made the Green party distinct from the chorus of her opponents than contributing to a cacophonic critique of the Conservative incumbent.

    The larger reality is that the federal leaders are only on a level playing field for the time of a debate or two.

    But the options of a two-tier debate or a duel between Stephen Harper and Michael Ignatieff both involve an even greater level of distortion.

    A one-on-one debate between the Liberal and Conservative leaders would be completely divorced from the electoral reality of regions such as Quebec and the Prairies.

    In a pre-election CROP poll, the Liberals barely beat the Greens for support in francophone Quebec.

    In Manitoba and Saskatchewan, shifting votes from the NDP to the Liberals is usually a formula for electing more Conservatives.

    Over the past three minority Parliaments, every elected leader has had occasion to play a pivotal role in the development of policy and, in a couple of instances, the crafting of a potential alternative government.

    In an ideal world, the election debates should feature leaders with some actual parliamentary presence and, based on that representation, second-tier parties in the House of Commons should not be treated as second-class debate players.

    saggio on
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  • Gnome-InterruptusGnome-Interruptus Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    uean wrote: »
    Jean wrote: »
    uean wrote: »
    A link on facebook just told me I agree with the politik of 57% of the Liberals, 55% Conservative, 54% NDP, 53% Green Party, and 26% BlocQ.

    Either that survey is busted or I've got some serious issues come voting time.

    Throw another 10% at the NDP for that Ensign Layton photo at the top.

    Care to share that link with us? I'd be curious to see what my results are.

    http://federal.votecompass.ca

    edit - you won't get the percentage points unless you take it without flash, like I did on my phone

    Rockin, thanks for the link. It indicated I would be most aligned with NDP / Green, which is kinda weird since I trashed them in the compare the parties section.

    Gnome-Interruptus on
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  • hippofanthippofant ティンク Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    So FYI, on that whole nuclear thing?

    Japanese nuclear plant ignored tsunami threat:
    Japan's government admitted Tuesday that its safeguards were insufficient to protect a nuclear plant against the earthquake and tsunami that crippled the facility and caused it to spew radiation, and it vowed to overhaul safety standards....

    An AP investigation found that Tokyo Electric Power Co. officials had dismissed scientific evidence and geological history that indicated that a massive earthquake — and subsequent tsunami — was far more likely than they believed.

    That left the complex with nowhere near enough protection against the March 11 tsunami.

    And this was my complaint with nuclear power. We're always promised that it's safe and that it'll be cheap and whatever, and on paper, it seems like it will. It looks fucking great on paper. But in implementation? Somebody inevitably cuts a corner and if we're unlucky, all hell breaks loose. Hubris, I say. Hubris.

    hippofant on
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    Should I even bother linking the huge fireball that was the oil refinery?

    shryke on
  • hippofanthippofant ティンク Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    Should I even bother mentioning again that I'm not making comparisons, but rather commenting on the portrayal of nuclear power as being "totally safe" being a sham?

    I mean, I think the Green Party's election platform is rather impractical. That doesn't mean I want to vote Conservative. Facts are facts, regardless of whether one fact is more or less unpleasant than another.

    hippofant on
  • AridholAridhol Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    hippofant wrote: »
    So FYI, on that whole nuclear thing?

    Japanese nuclear plant ignored tsunami threat:
    Japan's government admitted Tuesday that its safeguards were insufficient to protect a nuclear plant against the earthquake and tsunami that crippled the facility and caused it to spew radiation, and it vowed to overhaul safety standards....

    An AP investigation found that Tokyo Electric Power Co. officials had dismissed scientific evidence and geological history that indicated that a massive earthquake — and subsequent tsunami — was far more likely than they believed.

    That left the complex with nowhere near enough protection against the March 11 tsunami.

    And this was my complaint with nuclear power. We're always promised that it's safe and that it'll be cheap and whatever, and on paper, it seems like it will. It looks fucking great on paper. But in implementation? Somebody inevitably cuts a corner and if we're unlucky, all hell breaks loose. Hubris, I say. Hubris.


    I don't think this is an indictment of Nuclear Power but rather poor regulation and even worse enforcement.
    Unless somehow people believe companies cutting corners on safety is unique to the Nuclear industry.

    Aridhol on
  • quovadis13quovadis13 Registered User regular
    edited April 2011
    You aren't really describing something that's unique to the field of nuclear power generating. All types of industry and really, human nature in general share that mentality. Bridges have collapsed, airplanes have crashed, ships have sunk, factories have exploded and space shuttles have disintegrated all because of people cutting corners to save money or time. The best we can really hope for is that we try to catch as much of this behaviour before catastrophe occurs. Then when it does happen, we hope to learn as much as possible to hopefully prevent it from happening again.

    Hubris is a human fault, and the only reason we see it in nuclear power plants is because they are run by humans.

    quovadis13 on
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