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Questions, Discussion, Tutorials

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  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Ok I have another, completely unrelated, question for art-brained people

    I want to get a giant photo print, like A20 size, to go on my wall. I'm just wondering what the best material would be for such a thing? I don't think I'd like a canvas that big. But regular paper would probably be too flimsy. Any suggestions?

  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    There’s actually a bunch of options, depending on what kind of texture you’re after. For something that large you’d probably want a paper of at least 300 gsm, and then you can choose between matte/pearl/gloss/textured finishes.

    Most print shops (online or in person) will let you select a paper from their range, so specific papers depends a bit on where you get it printed, but just in general I really like the Hahnemuhle photo range, especially their photo rag.

    Brovid Hasselsmof
  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Another question, is it possible to work out how a picture will look when printed large? The one I want is of an elephant. If I zoom into the photo so the eye is as big as it would be on the print it looks blurry, but I have no idea if that's representative of what it would look like after printing. I guess the photo resolution wouldn't be the same as my screen resolution.

    I just want to know if this thing is going to look ok as a giant poster before I waste the money on it. It's currently a CR2 file if that is relevant.

  • My instinct is to say that if it's blurry on your monitor, it's almost certainly going to be blurry in print (though not being a photographer who works with CR2 files generally, I suppose it's possible there's some software nonsense there I'm not familiar with that would make it appear blurry even if the resolution was there.)

    It basically comes down to how many pixels you've got to work with versus how close you are meant to view it- for books/magazines and such, meant to be viewed close up, the standard is to have the source images be at least 300dpi.
    For a 'giant poster' meant to be viewed from further away, you would be able to get away with a lower dpi and have the viewing experience be fine, even if it's blurry if you get really close. (Maybe I'm wrong, but I assume McDonald's isn't working with a 20TB .psd file for every billboard it puts up just to have a 300dpi 10 foot tall Big Mac by the side of the I-75.)

    If the source image just isn't big enough resolution-wise, there's gonna be blurring no matter what- printer software/Photoshop/etc. won't be able to add data that's not there in the first place. (I suppose there might be an AI solution out there now to fake in a bunch of data to upres the image, but you're on your own if you want to try to figure that stuff out). How much blurring is acceptable for your use case is kinda up to you/(your client, if there is one).


    Icemopper
  • tbloxhamtbloxham Registered User regular
    I've been using drawing and sketching to stay marginally saner than I otherwise would have been during the pandemic, and have discovered that what I really like drawing is cartoon/anime style characters drawn with colored pencils (I use Arteza) with relatively bright colors and dense dark lines. This is great, it brings me much joy, even though I've only been at it for 5 months so it's probably rubbish. The issue though is that I use a RIDICULOUS amount more black/very very dark grey colored pencils compared to anything else, because I need to use them both with a lot of pressure to get very dark lines, and sharpen them to do detailed lines on faces and things. The lines look rubbish in graphite pencil, so I have to use black colored pencils for that 'pop'. This means that while there are three pencils which are dark enough for line works in the set I buy, I've now gone through those 3 twice, while only being like, 10% of the way through any other color (seriously, the sharpening and need for dark lines is a killer).

    So, before I buy yet another box of pencils JUST to replace the damn blacks, is there a way to buy just one specific color of coloring pencil online anyway? I just need like, 24 A016 Onyx Black pencils and then I can buy other colors as I need them in sets.

    Any thoughts?

    "That is cool" - Abraham Lincoln
  • Angel_of_BaconAngel_of_Bacon Moderator mod
    edited November 2020
    @tbloxham Not sure about Arteza (couldn't find this in a few minutes of searching, maybe I'm not looking deep enough), but other brands like Prismacolor will certainly let you buy specific colors one at a time instead of in a set.

    (Scroll down past the sets here and it'll let you order any color you want individually.)
    https://www.dickblick.com/products/prismacolor-premier-colored-pencils/

    Angel_of_Bacon on
  • tbloxhamtbloxham Registered User regular
    @tbloxham Not sure about Arteza (couldn't find this in a few minutes of searching, maybe I'm not looking deep enough), but other brands like Prismacolor will certainly let you buy specific colors one at a time instead of in a set.

    (Scroll down past the sets here and it'll let you order any color you want individually, with a bit of discount if you order more than 12 of a color)
    https://www.dickblick.com/products/prismacolor-premier-colored-pencils/

    Look at that! Black colored pencils :) I shall no longer need to feel quite so bad about sharpening the damn things :)

    5 months ago when I started on my little drawing journey I hemmed and hawed about arteza vs prisma color and only ended up with Arteza because I liked their graphite pencils, but either will be awesome.

    Ha, most pleased to not have to work with a tiny nub of an onyx black pencil :)

    "That is cool" - Abraham Lincoln
  • IcemopperIcemopper Registered User regular
    @tbloxham I don't have direct experience with Arteza, but Prismacolor might behave differently than you'd expect. There's a waxy/oily quality to their pencils that fill the tooth of the paper with more pressure. The vibrancy is there with a lighter touch, and depending on the tooth you might not need more pressure, but if you do apply more pressure the material gets that oily quality that really sticks out compared to some other brands. I tend to not use their black colored pencil and instead use the 90% cool or warm grey colors if I want to get that dark. Since you're going for that cartoon/anime style the black will probably suit you quite well. I'm looking forward to see what you come up with, I've always loved using my Prismacolors.

  • tbloxhamtbloxham Registered User regular
    Icemopper wrote: »
    @tbloxham I don't have direct experience with Arteza, but Prismacolor might behave differently than you'd expect. There's a waxy/oily quality to their pencils that fill the tooth of the paper with more pressure. The vibrancy is there with a lighter touch, and depending on the tooth you might not need more pressure, but if you do apply more pressure the material gets that oily quality that really sticks out compared to some other brands. I tend to not use their black colored pencil and instead use the 90% cool or warm grey colors if I want to get that dark. Since you're going for that cartoon/anime style the black will probably suit you quite well. I'm looking forward to see what you come up with, I've always loved using my Prismacolors.

    Going for/all I can achieve :) I'm just excited to not have to explain to the wife why I need a third box of coloring pencils when only three of the ones in the second pack have run out ;)

    "That is cool" - Abraham Lincoln
  • I don't know a lot about colored pencils, just that Prismacolors are the ones I see the most at art supply stores. Clicking back to the main category on Dick Blick it looks like there's a good variety of pencils of other brands that sell individually that you can check out if the Prismacolors don't do it for ya. :)
    https://www.dickblick.com/categories/drawing/colored-pencils/

  • tbloxhamtbloxham Registered User regular
    I was going to punish you all for your helpfulness by sharing one of my drawings over in the doodle thread, but having seen the quality of everyone elses work I think I'll inflict whatever I have which is best on you in a month or so instead ;) Logically I will be 20% better at drawing by then!

    "That is cool" - Abraham Lincoln
  • Lucid_SeraphLucid_Seraph TealDeer MarylandRegistered User regular
    Hey, so, I'm thinking of trying to get back into drawing, and I'm wondering about how I can make my own perspective tools & viewfinders for traditional art. I know there's plenty of purchase options, but that seems stupid given that they are mostly just... rulers and stuff. I remember making a viewfinder in college literally out of cardboard and floss, because I was so dirt poor I didn't have anything else. So that kind of DIY thing.

    Anyway a long time ago I saw some witchcraft with a string or rubber band and a hook that the guy used, but I haven't been able to find that again. When I Google, the results are either "Buy Our Overpriced Plastic!!!" or "Here's how to do it in Adobe Illustrator or Photoshop" which isn't what I want.

    The Escape Goat: If there's anywhere that Occam's Razor fails to apply it's Elder Scrolls lore.
    Delduwath: Yeah, gotta use Mehrunes' Razor.
  • ReznikReznik Registered User regular
    Any advice/resources for someone looking to transition from pencil and paper to digital? I only ever really do greyscale sketches so my grasp of colour is... not great. And I'm basically at a loss for how to appropriately translate my current drawing techniques (in terms of shading and such) to a tablet and digital canvas. My focus is just on characters for now.

    I have a monoprice tablet and a copy of Photoshop CS4. Though if there's any nicer (free) software geared towards drawing I'll gladly take a look at it.

    Do... Re.... Mi... Ti... La...
    Do... Re... Mi... So... Fa.... Do... Re.... Do...
    Forget it...
  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    edited January 31
    I've heard good thing from the folks in here about Krita.
    https://krita.org/en/
    【DRAWING】 Let's Learn Krita Together!! 2:22:16


    Looking forward to seeing your art! I can't help with techniques since I am learning too so hopefully someone more qualified will appear to answer your questions

    Peas on
  • Angel_of_BaconAngel_of_Bacon Moderator mod
    Reznik wrote: »
    Any advice/resources for someone looking to transition from pencil and paper to digital? I only ever really do greyscale sketches so my grasp of colour is... not great. And I'm basically at a loss for how to appropriately translate my current drawing techniques (in terms of shading and such) to a tablet and digital canvas. My focus is just on characters for now.

    I have a monoprice tablet and a copy of Photoshop CS4. Though if there's any nicer (free) software geared towards drawing I'll gladly take a look at it.

    I don't have any experience with monoprice tablets, but I doubt that you need anything different from what you've already got to produce good work. (PS has worked for me for the last 23 years, it'll probably serve you just fine.)

    In terms advice, steering you towards something immediately helpful would be a lot easier if I knew what sort of work you were looking to produce (like an example picture of some artist's work that you'd like your work to look like), since the process involved is going to vary pretty differently if you're trying to produce superhero comic ink+color work, versus something very textural and painterly, or something more abstract graphic design-y, or something else.

    Without getting into any specific technique or process, I'd say learning photoshop for a time is mostly going to be playing around and just having fun digging into it. Making a bunch of layers and seeing what all the blend modes do, screwing around with all the brush settings and see what they all do, what changes when you change the numbers in the boxes, trying out everything on the toolbar and see what they do, etc. etc. Don't worry about producing great professional work right away, just have some fun learning what the tools do first. (I guess I'll point out you should looking up "clipping masks" because unlike most PS features, I don't remember them being easily discoverable, and they're very helpful.)

    Once you have familiarity with the tools, it's easier to break down how other artists use the tools/figuring out which tools have to be applied in what way to navigate from your starting point to your desired end point.

    Having taught myself a number of intimidating art software packages (Blender, Unity, etc,), I get a lot more success by throwing myself headlong into something I'd like to do, and then experimenting and/or shouting at google and youtube asking how to navigate through any specific feature/issue/problem that I need to along the way, than trying to find a one-stop-shop tutorial or lengthy, school-style class, but YMMV.
    If I want to do something I'll load up the first 3 results on youtube, put it on double playback speed, skip the first 3 minutes of logos and the "LIKE COMMENT AND SUBSCRIBE" speech or whatever, find the one 25 second segment of actual useful information, and then shut that tab down, never to be seen again. If you know what you want to accomplish, and are then ruthlessly efficient and immediate about hunting down each little issue you need to solve along the way, you'll probably get yourself up to speed with everything you need to know pretty quickly. (And it's more fun. Well, I think it is, anyway).


    That said, just learning the software is not all of what it takes to learn how to get tasteful/artistic results out of it- and if we're taking color as an example, you don't need to be looking for specific "photoshop color advice", you can get color advice from anyone working in any medium, the knowledge will still apply. My go-to resource on color is James Gurney's book Color and Light (his blog is also a treasure trove of free information, but you have to dig through a lot of more trivial stuff to get to the meat sometimes. Clicking the tags for posts on specific subjects helps http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/ ). Even though he's working primarily in oil and gouache, the same color theory principles and principles of light and lighting design will apply equally to any medium.

    Peas
  • initiatefailureinitiatefailure Registered User regular
    Does anyone know if we have a thread anywhere on any of the forums for stuff like "I'm teaching myself unity and what the hell am I doing?"

    I Do Design | I PSN- Subtle_Ties | 3DS: 3840-5210-2008 (Subtle)
  • Angel_of_BaconAngel_of_Bacon Moderator mod
    Does anyone know if we have a thread anywhere on any of the forums for stuff like "I'm teaching myself unity and what the hell am I doing?"

    Game dev thread in G&T maybe?

    https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/206950/game-dev-i-dont-have-a-publisher-what-i-do-have-are-a-very-particular-set-of-skills/p1

  • cj iwakuracj iwakura The Rhythm Regent The World on This SideRegistered User regular
    Would it be okay to share mixing, i.e. DJ mixes, in the music production thread, or is that a completely different thing? Would it even be appropriate in this board?

    rpcJVoo.png
  • ChicoBlueChicoBlue Registered User regular
    Some good fine art portrait block-in videos:

    Stephen Bauman
    (1.45 mins)


    Scott Waddell
    (54:37 mins)


    Bauman has a lot more videos on his channel.

    They both also have patreons where you can pop in for a month or two and absorb some of their longer videos.

    Scott Waddell also has a website where he sells videos on painting and such.

    Peas
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