Club PA 2.0 has arrived! If you'd like to access some extra PA content and help support the forums, check it out at patreon.com/ClubPA
The image size limit has been raised to 1mb! Anything larger than that should be linked to. This is a HARD limit, please do not abuse it.
Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

[Programming] djmitchella travelling through snow to rfind duplicate dates for singletons

ecco the dolphinecco the dolphin Registered User regular
This is the PA programming thread, home to programmers everywhere. Here we talk about cats, ponies, synergised high-efficiency software cloud platforms, and occasionally programming. Apparently the old OP is, well, old, so we've constructed a revolutionary new cost-effective commercial-grade solution for all your enterprise needs.
padevnet.png
PADev.net is a project started up by this thread to support PA developers. A discussion about shared hosting turns into an idea to have hosting and a community to support those working on hobby programs and web services and what not.

Some things require a dedicated VPS but the bar of entry isn't that low. The cost is not extravagant but the know-how required to manage one is daunting for many. PAdev.net provides a share of hosting and support, a $5 monthly fee nets you a shell account on the hub server and the expertise of your peers.

Community members looking to help out can request an account for the website, where all members can create and maintain guides and share project updates. There is no cost to have a community account, just contact an administrator. Also available are [email protected] email accounts or forwarders.

Current administrators: @Infidel

Languages
  • Python - One of the most popular scripting languages around, Python is the go-to language for...just about everything, actually. Its high scalability and widespread support through third-party libraries make it useful for many applications, from simple five-minute jobs to complex Web servers. Python can also be embedded or bound into lower-level languages such as C, letting you write performance-critical code as well as providing access to libraries written for those languages.
  • Ruby - Another popular scripting language, Ruby is best known as the basis for Ruby on Rails, a framework for Web development that competes with its Python equivalent, Django. While not quite as famous as the juggernaut that is Python, Ruby is nonetheless prolific - modern versions of RPG Maker use it as their scripting language, for instance. And, of course, it can be embedded into other applications, much like Python.
  • Lua - Yet another scripting language. Lua is built on two principles: simplicity and minimalism. Designed with embedding in mind, Lua's overhead is tiny (it can be counted in hundreds of kilobytes at most) and the language itself only provides a handful of constructs...until you master the black arts of tables and metatables. Those who have done so claim to have seen the face of God; these claims are as yet unsubstantiated. What we do know, however is that in recent years Lua has garnered much attention thanks to LuaJIT, a project that provides not only a just-in-time compiler for Lua (granting a massive speed boost - almost C-like performance, in fact), but also an FFI (foreign function interface) library, allowing Lua scripts to directly call C functions without the hassle of writing boilerplate C bindings.
  • C and C++ The Ones Who Came Before. C and C++ are old, clunky, archaic...and the most popular languages in existence. C was conceived in an era when memory was limited and programs were generally written in non-portable assembly languages. The underlying concept (which persists to this day) was that a compiler would take C code, turn it into assembly, and then turn that into an executable or library. Thus, programmers now only had to port most of the codebase instead of all of it! (the situation has improved considerably since then, of course - these days, only the really low-level stuff has a tough time being cross-platform). C++ came some time later, and shook things up significantly with the concepts of classes and generics. Modern C++ also includes the Standard Template Library, or STL, which provides all sorts of useful functionality to make life almost painless. These days most people will learn something simpler like Python before these guys, but make no mistake - everything from your operating system to your favourite video games to your microwave can trace its roots back to one of the two.
  • C# - The poster boy for Microsoft's .NET Framework, C# is a JIT-compiled language modelled after C++, but without any of the associated pain. Though initially developed as a robust alternative for Windows development, Microsoft makes the specifications available at no cost, which has led to other implementations popping up - the most well-known being the cross-platform Mono. The main draw of C# is its ease of use: with a ridiculous number of APIs available by default and the ability to call into native code, you'll have a tough time finding something higher-level that you can't do in C#. The fact that Visual Studio, one of the best IDEs around, also supports C#, is just icing on the cake.
  • Android - Directly responsible for bringing this OP into the 21st century, Android is a pseudo-operating system framework which runs on top of Linux. Android is primarily written in Java, though it also combines elements of C, C++ and sometimes even Python, and is designed for mobile devices. The Android application framework represents an almost entirely event-driven paradigm written primarily in Java which heavily utilises usage of background services, model-view-controller, and sub-classing as a method of changing behaviour of standard pieces. Also, it runs on your phone!
  • Java - :rotate:
  • PHP - :rotate:

(Credit: Original OP here)

Penny Arcade Developers at PADev.net.
ecco the dolphin on
bowenEvigilant
«134567100

Posts

  • ecco the dolphinecco the dolphin Registered User regular
    My brain is a weird thing.

    Saturday:

    Me: Man, this is a really nice day and I'm looking forward to relaxing after these chores.
    Brain: You know you can turn loopback on, right?
    Me: What? What is the context of this thought?
    Brain: You know, work. At work, you're trying to calibrate without a reference. But if you turn loopback on, you can provide your own guaranteed reference.
    Me: IT'S THE WEEKEND GODDAMN IT but yeah you're right.

    Silly brain.

    So here I am Monday morning, nutting through the details.

    If I do this right, this (small, but critical) portion of the project will be self calibrating and relatively robust to hardware changes....

    Penny Arcade Developers at PADev.net.
  • TryCatcherTryCatcher Registered User regular
    edited September 2014
    So, spent all Saturday coding Android on Eclipse, because fuck the Android Studio noise of having my entire proyect break for a Gradle update.

    Is nice an all, but the slowness and overall badness of the IDE (Is an error that your code isn't translated on ALL languages by default when you create the .apk? Really?)makes the experience kind of annoying.

    Android Development: Kind of Annoying. A more truthful slogan.

    Basic Java is smooth and polished by comparison.

    TryCatcher on
  • zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    edited September 2014
    Izzimach wrote: »
    zeeny wrote: »
    Oh my god I'm enjoying lambda functions too much

    What have I been missing out on all these years? D:

    GIVE ME MORE OF YOUR HIGH LEVEL LANGUAGE CONCEPTS

    Watch any and all of Hickey's clojure videos(particularly those introducing new language features), even if you don't care about clojure.

    I started out trying clojure because I was "lisp-curious" but I found the biggest mind-expanding aspect was built-in support for immutable data structures. You can modify a data structure and get a new version without screwing up the original? Madness! They're obviously slower than mutable equivalents and while certain algorithms definitely require a bag of mutable state, plenty of problems could benefit from immutable data. Certain programming tasks become a lot easier--and sometimes a bit faster--with immutable data.

    It's also cool to get a sense at the underlying implementation, where you can have (for example) three slightly different versions of a data structure without using three times the memory. Even some JavaScript guys are getting on the immutable bandwagon.

    Insights when learning clojure and being involved with the language in general feel very satisfying. Immutable data structures and "values" certainly is one of those. Async, lazy sequence functions & eager parallel reducers, recently transducers etc. Transit is nice, even if doomed. I find the language's philosophy on how to do programming and to approach problem resolution very attractive. I'm hoping we'll be delivering our first clojure project by the end of the year!

    In the video with Beckeman I posted above(unless I am remembering the wrong video.....), they briefly discuss performance and algorithmic guarantees they needed to satisfy for the immutable data structures, could be interesting for you if you haven't seen it.

    zeeny on
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    After playing around with wave and all the other graphics engines, I decided to give unity a try again.

    Unity feels more complete, but god damned does it feel like it's more an art asset engine than anything. It feels like programming is just tacked on.

    Ladies.
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited September 2014
    so I was watching Formula 1 on Sunday as I often do, and this year the cars have an even more complicated and expensive wheel that has a large LCD display and appears to run a lightweight linux distro for its car diagnostics and control program

    a big problem this year for some of the poorly funded teams is car turbulence is causing the systems to crash and reboot, effectively leaving the car dead while it restarts

    i am wandering aloud what kind of turbulence could have an impact on a computer with no mechanical harddrive that would cause the system to shut down and restart

    as a humorous bonus, when the system reboots, they get a branded BIOS screen that they have to wait on until the system finishes loading. no word on if there's a key to hide it so they can see their memcheck and S.M.A.R.T statuses

    Jasconius on
  • EtheaEthea Registered User regular
    Jasconius wrote: »
    so I was watching Formula 1 on Sunday as I often do, and this year the cars have an even more complicated and expensive wheel that has a large LCD display and appears to run a lightweight linux distro for its car diagnostics and control program

    a big problem this year for some of the poorly funded teams is car turbulence is causing the systems to crash and reboot, effectively leaving the car dead while it restarts

    i am wandering aloud what kind of turbulence could have an impact on a computer with no mechanical harddrive that would cause the system to shut down and restart

    as a humorous bonus, when the system reboots, they get a branded BIOS screen that they have to wait on until the system finishes loading. no word on if there's a key to hide it so they can see their memcheck and S.M.A.R.T statuses

    Maybe issues with the connection between the power and the board, or maybe the board is actually twisting causing shorts. But I am not a hardware guy.

  • HounHoun Registered User regular
    Jasconius wrote: »
    so I was watching Formula 1 on Sunday as I often do, and this year the cars have an even more complicated and expensive wheel that has a large LCD display and appears to run a lightweight linux distro for its car diagnostics and control program

    a big problem this year for some of the poorly funded teams is car turbulence is causing the systems to crash and reboot, effectively leaving the car dead while it restarts

    i am wandering aloud what kind of turbulence could have an impact on a computer with no mechanical harddrive that would cause the system to shut down and restart

    as a humorous bonus, when the system reboots, they get a branded BIOS screen that they have to wait on until the system finishes loading. no word on if there's a key to hide it so they can see their memcheck and S.M.A.R.T statuses

    Are you sure about that? I suppose it's also possible something is becoming unseated/disconnected.

  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    even the poor teams spare no expense on the wheels, as they are usually purchased from richer suppliers. they would be pretty insane to put a mechanical hard-drive in something that is routinely exposed to 5g's. i imagine it's either an SSD or it runs off of some kind of ROM

  • mightyjongyomightyjongyo Registered User regular
    Considering how much vibration and stress those cars are under, it wouldn't surprise me if connections are coming unseated because the poorer teams couldn't afford to securely bolt down those connections. I've seen it happen on my company's prototype system a number of times (USB connections don't tend to stay seated when rotating at 150 RPM). Could also see something shorting because of similar reasons.

  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    I helped with some race car systems during my student years, the big problem is the wiring. Connections and vibrations, as well as that big noise generator of an engine that causes mad EMI. You have to get creative and break up the wiring and route it and you can have some annoying restrictions.

    OrokosPA.png
    Play D&D 4e? :: Check out Orokos and upload your Character Builder sheet! :: Orokos Dice Roller
    The PhalLounge :: Chat board for Critical Failures IRC! :: #CriticalFailures and #mafia on irc.slashnet.org
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    yeah it must be a combination of wiring and perhaps also extreme heat. these cars carry large batteries under constant load in addition to the high ambient temps and the engine heat. I imagine it probably challenges the shielding of the wires

  • SporkAndrewSporkAndrew Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Trying to work out AWS pricing is like I'm playing numberwang. I've had a large instance running off and on for the past few days whilst I write some processes to spin up, transfer some data to a mongo dB and them spin back down automatically.

    Somehow two days has cost the company $18.30. I go into the cost explorer and there's just words and acroynms and it's almost like the phase of the moon has some effect.

    This is before I've started spinning up 10 EMR nodes, so I'm looking forwards to seeing that bill once I start trying to crunch 26 million records.

    The one about the fucking space hairdresser and the cowboy. He's got a tinfoil pal and a pedal bin. His father's a robot and he's fucking fucked his sister. Lego. They're all made of fucking lego.
  • ecco the dolphinecco the dolphin Registered User regular
    edited September 2014
    Infidel wrote: »
    I helped with some race car systems during my student years, the big problem is the wiring. Connections and vibrations, as well as that big noise generator of an engine that causes mad EMI. You have to get creative and break up the wiring and route it and you can have some annoying restrictions.

    Probably that.

    If you haven't got your interference suppression sorted correctly, you're up the creek.

    It's surprisingly tough to get interference sorted out - it comes in from every possible nook and cranny (or hell, even conducted through power cables).
    Trying to work out AWS pricing is like I'm playing numberwang. I've had a large instance running off and on for the past few days whilst I write some processes to spin up, transfer some data to a mongo dB and them spin back down automatically.

    Somehow two days has cost the company $18.30. I go into the cost explorer and there's just words and acroynms and it's almost like the phase of the moon has some effect.

    This is before I've started spinning up 10 EMR nodes, so I'm looking forwards to seeing that bill once I start trying to crunch 26 million records.

    And that's wangernumb!

    ecco the dolphin on
    Penny Arcade Developers at PADev.net.
  • DyasAlureDyasAlure SeattleRegistered User regular
    edited September 2014
    my java class... I don't even know what to say. I think that the teacher is straight up stealing the class from UW via there website. And I'm paying this teacher; to not use there own material. I could have just gone to the UW website and "taken" the class....

    But, it get me a degree in the end... How is this useful? this better be useful.

    Edit:
    for those who use java :rotate: what IDE do you use? I was pointed to jgrasp.

    edit 2:
    I have visual studio, can I just use that?

    DyasAlure on
    My%20Steam.png?psid=1My%20Twitch%20-%20Mass%20Effect.png?psid=1=1My%20Youtube.png?psid=1
  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    For the classroom, your best bet is probably downloading Eclipse, as it is what is expected at most schools that I've seen.

    It works just fine for assignments and school projects, and is likely what the majority will be using so you can get some help / not run into unexpected issues so much.

    OrokosPA.png
    Play D&D 4e? :: Check out Orokos and upload your Character Builder sheet! :: Orokos Dice Roller
    The PhalLounge :: Chat board for Critical Failures IRC! :: #CriticalFailures and #mafia on irc.slashnet.org
  • iTunesIsEviliTunesIsEvil Registered User regular
    <choking/gagging noises> Eclipse

    DelmainTryCatcherbowenEvigilant
  • mightyjongyomightyjongyo Registered User regular
    Netbeans is also pretty decent from what I remember, but it's been a little over three years since I last used it (or anything java related, for that matter).

    TryCatcher
  • KambingKambing Registered User regular
    edited September 2014
    DyasAlure wrote: »
    my java class... I don't even know what to say. I think that the teacher is straight up stealing the class from UW via there website. And I'm paying this teacher; to not use there own material. I could have just gone to the UW website and "taken" the class....

    But, it get me a degree in the end... How is this useful? this better be useful.

    Edit:
    for those who use java :rotate: what IDE do you use? I was pointed to jgrasp.

    edit 2:
    I have visual studio, can I just use that?

    To be fair, the materials from Building Java Programs is fairly complete insofar as lecture notes and assignments go. But yea, ideally as an instructor you use other material as a basis and make it relevant in-context for your class. That being said, many instructors don't, especially when they are removed from the material.

    Also, even though you have some programming experience, I highly recommend that you avoid an industrial-strength IDE like Eclipse or Netbeans. Use a simpler IDE like jgrasp or drjava and spend your effort on soaking in the material rather than fighting your editor. Alternatively, if you feel up to the challenge, rather than use a teaching IDE, use the class as an opportunity to teach yourself basic unix command line development skills. Such skills are essential as you move through a computer science curriculum.

    Kambing on
    @TwitchTV, @Youtube: master-level zerg ladder/customs, commentary, and random miscellany.
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    fixed one of my significant lighting bugs today. only one left, which is the RGB->HSL->RGB conversion

    taking some time off from C to work on my tooling systems. I'm going to build my game data management tool in a local rails instance running off of SQLite. Then I'll write a bash script to curl all of the JSON out of Rails and save it to the client directory

    can't think of a faster way to have a GUI interface for building out items/monster data

    ecco the dolphinInfidelMahnmut
  • TryCatcherTryCatcher Registered User regular
    edited September 2014
    Kambing wrote: »
    DyasAlure wrote: »
    my java class... I don't even know what to say. I think that the teacher is straight up stealing the class from UW via there website. And I'm paying this teacher; to not use there own material. I could have just gone to the UW website and "taken" the class....

    But, it get me a degree in the end... How is this useful? this better be useful.

    Edit:
    for those who use java :rotate: what IDE do you use? I was pointed to jgrasp.

    edit 2:
    I have visual studio, can I just use that?

    To be fair, the materials from Building Java Programs is fairly complete insofar as lecture notes and assignments go. But yea, ideally as an instructor you use other material as a basis and make it relevant in-context for your class. That being said, many instructors don't, especially when they are removed from the material.

    Also, even though you have some programming experience, I highly recommend that you avoid an industrial-strength IDE like Eclipse or Netbeans. Use a simpler IDE like jgrasp or drjava and spend your effort on soaking in the material rather than fighting your editor. Alternatively, if you feel up to the challenge, rather than use a teaching IDE, use the class as an opportunity to teach yourself basic unix command line development skills. Such skills are essential as you move through a computer science curriculum.

    I used NetBeans to learn both Java and OOP when I was on that part of my career, is not hard to use. It comes whole with the Java Development's Kit since years ago, so you just install it, decide where you want your files to go, and then is File -> New Project -> Java Application, write the name and off you go.

    I still use it.

    TryCatcher on
  • Monkey Ball WarriorMonkey Ball Warrior A collection of mediocre hats Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited September 2014
    <rant>
    I am feeling almost irrationally opposed to the idea of encoding any metadata in variable names. I'm okay with using a single char or even capitalization (see: golang) to differentiate between public and private facing variables, or to get around an IDE or language deficiency. Hungarian notation would be the worst version of this, but in this instance it was using prefixed m_ for class members and s_ for static fields in java. It just fells like this unnamed person or persons are going out of the way to make java even more verbose than it already is. Eclipse, IntelliJ, and vim will all display those differently inline anyway. And statics that aren't CONSTANTS are rare anyway. Or at least they should be.
    </rant>

    Am I wrong?

    Monkey Ball Warrior on
    "I resent the entire notion of a body as an ante and then raise you a generalized dissatisfaction with physicality itself" -- Tycho
  • AnteCantelopeAnteCantelope Registered User regular
    You're absolutely not wrong.

    I've heard good arguments for putting useful information in variable names, like having raw_ before strings that come from user input, and safe_ for ones that have gone through validation.

    But then I think that's the sort of thing we make classes for. Don't have String safe_foo and String raw_bar, have SafeString foo and RawString bar.

  • KambingKambing Registered User regular
    edited September 2014
    TryCatcher wrote: »
    Kambing wrote: »
    DyasAlure wrote: »
    my java class... I don't even know what to say. I think that the teacher is straight up stealing the class from UW via there website. And I'm paying this teacher; to not use there own material. I could have just gone to the UW website and "taken" the class....

    But, it get me a degree in the end... How is this useful? this better be useful.

    Edit:
    for those who use java :rotate: what IDE do you use? I was pointed to jgrasp.

    edit 2:
    I have visual studio, can I just use that?

    To be fair, the materials from Building Java Programs is fairly complete insofar as lecture notes and assignments go. But yea, ideally as an instructor you use other material as a basis and make it relevant in-context for your class. That being said, many instructors don't, especially when they are removed from the material.

    Also, even though you have some programming experience, I highly recommend that you avoid an industrial-strength IDE like Eclipse or Netbeans. Use a simpler IDE like jgrasp or drjava and spend your effort on soaking in the material rather than fighting your editor. Alternatively, if you feel up to the challenge, rather than use a teaching IDE, use the class as an opportunity to teach yourself basic unix command line development skills. Such skills are essential as you move through a computer science curriculum.

    I used NetBeans to learn both Java and OOP when I was on that part of my career, is not hard to use. It comes whole with the Java Development's Kit since years ago, so you just install it, decide where you want your files to go, and then is File -> New Project -> Java Application, write the name and off you go.

    I still use it.

    NetBeans is a perfectly fine IDE. But at best, it's complete overkill for an introductory programming course and at worst, hides some of the important details of how compilation works from the student. I would go so far to say that there is absolutely no gain with using Eclipse/NetBeans over a simpler IDE like jGrasp/DrJava or even a text editor with appropriate syntax highlighting in a CS1 course especially one based on the book @DyasAlure is using.
    <rant>
    I am feeling almost irrationally opposed to the idea of encoding any metadata in variable names. I'm okay with using a single char or even capitalization (see: golang) to differentiate between public and private facing variables, or to get around an IDE or language deficiency. Hungarian notation would be the worst version of this, but in this instance it was using prefixed m_ for class members and s_ for static fields in java. It just fells like this unnamed person or persons are going out of the way to make java even more verbose than it already is. Eclipse, IntelliJ, and vim will all display those differently inline anyway. And statics that aren't CONSTANTS are rare anyway. Or at least they should be.
    </rant>

    Am I wrong?

    Nope. You just need to be using the right language, is all!
    let gen_eexp_rel_app (s:Sig.t) ((xrel, trel):id * typ)
                         (g:Ctx.t) (t:typ) (met:metric) : exp Rope.t = (* ... *)
    

    Kambing on
    @TwitchTV, @Youtube: master-level zerg ladder/customs, commentary, and random miscellany.
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Jetbrain's intelliJ is probably hands down the best Java editor.

    Ladies.
    Delmainxraydog
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    Netbeans or Eclipse. Use Netbeans for application development and Eclipse for J2EE stuff (I find it's easier to use Tomcat/Geronimo/etc with it).

    TryCatcher
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    I hate using _ in variable names because I feel like it adds like 2 seconds to my typing every time I have to use one.

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited September 2014
    I use _ when I really don't want to use it. If it's a "once and done" type of variable, like maybe a configuration parameter I loaded from a file and passed to an object or something.

    At least, as a prefix to the variable.

    Using them in the middle is chumps.

    theBest is better than the_best

    I use upper camelcase for Public variables/functions, and lower camelcase for private.

    bowen on
    Ladies.
  • KambingKambing Registered User regular
    I go through phases based off of what I'm writing at the time. If I'm using Java, Javascript, C#, C++, or Haskell, then camelCase looks right. If it's C, Python, or OCaml, then underscores look right. On the off-chance that I'm using Racket extensively, then it's dashes.

    Dashes are sort of fun as a whitespace delimiter (e.g., find-system-path). A smaller part of me wishes for more languages to do that. A larger part of me wishes that coding conventions were consistent between languages so I didn't have to switch back and forth.

    @TwitchTV, @Youtube: master-level zerg ladder/customs, commentary, and random miscellany.
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    I would make you so angry.

    Ladies.
  • EtheaEthea Registered User regular
    I have converted over to using names_with_dashes for local scope variables in c++. But than every project I work on has different naming conventions and we have projects that use the m_ syntax for member variables. If it is good enough for the stl and Bjarne it is good enough for me.

  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    Wow... Sweet Jesus. Shit has really hit the fan here. We've had like 5-6 tech leads quit the past week or so. Another was told that they're going to fire him soon (he doesn't care he said... been there for like 11 years... Will get severance and 5 weeks of paid vacation). Then, while troubleshooting an error, we're told that our Nexus repo was never meant to actually be talking to the outside world. It was to be a closed box. So in order to fix the issues we're having with our deployments that we should manually upload all 100+ of our artifacts.

    Our Team Lead was going to try and get us a few hours to play around with HTML5 so we can build some decent mobile apps and start on it. When he talked to the department manager about it he came back pretty much saying "Yeah they said they weren't interested, I guess it's time to abandon ship".

    mightyjongyoInfidelVegemyte
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    I was kinda hoping to make it 5 years at a place. Looks like ~2 years is my sweet spot right now.

  • EvigilantEvigilant VARegistered User regular
    I absolutely despise names_with_dashes for variables because it's never consistent. It's first_second_third a few times then fir_sec_thi a few other times then first_sec_third everywhere else.

    Google+ Profile XBL\PSN\Steam\Origin: Evigilant
    urahonkybowen
  • EtheaEthea Registered User regular
    Evigilant wrote: »
    I absolutely despise names_with_dashes for variables because it's never consistent. It's first_second_third a few times then fir_sec_thi a few other times then first_sec_third everywhere else.

    That arugment transfers over to any naming convention. e.g. namesWithCamelCase, naWiCaCase, camelCaseNames, namesCamelCased

    urahonkyEvigilantmightyjongyoInfidelexis
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Ethea wrote: »
    Evigilant wrote: »
    I absolutely despise names_with_dashes for variables because it's never consistent. It's first_second_third a few times then fir_sec_thi a few other times then first_sec_third everywhere else.

    That arugment transfers over to any naming convention. e.g. namesWithCamelCase, naWiCaCase, camelCaseNames, namesCamelCased

    Someone's getting real close to a stabbing.

    Ladies.
    EvigilantVegemyte
  • DyasAlureDyasAlure SeattleRegistered User regular
    thanks for the info. I installed jgrasp. first time I played with java, I used notepad and command line compiler. Not sure I want to go back that far.

    My%20Steam.png?psid=1My%20Twitch%20-%20Mass%20Effect.png?psid=1=1My%20Youtube.png?psid=1
  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    Obviously all names should be some varying number of underscores, or em-dashes if the language allows for it.

    ___ and ____ for lyfe.

  • CampyCampy Registered User regular
    Part of our core code is a library that deals with stock.

    In some places this is reference as stk or STK, in other stock and STOCK. In the core as core gets library, that has been around for about a decade.
    stabby stabby stabby stabby stabby

    Evigilant
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Why would you not refer to it as stock everywhere, that is a whole lot of hassle for 2 letters.

    Ladies.
    Campy
  • mightyjongyomightyjongyo Registered User regular
    Same reason why _ is a hassle to denote as private (or whatever) for some people, it's only two extra keystrokes but hey.

«134567100
Sign In or Register to comment.