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Twitter Continues To Have A [Twitter] Problem

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Posts

  • MorganVMorganV Registered User regular
    Mortious wrote: »
    Zek wrote: »
    I think the position of Twitter/Facebook/etc on these things has been made pretty clear - politicians are quite literally allowed to break the rules, purportedly because it's important for the public to see that they broke the rules. It'll take more than a little political pressure to make them change their minds on that.

    Does that count for people like the Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan? That's a political position, too. Or the head of ISIS.

    First one yes, second one no. We've seen more than enough examples on how Twitter enforces their rules.

    Yeaah, melanin count, or genetic measure of caucasity, goes a long way to determining treatment by social media.

    Though not disproportionately from society at large.

    LovelyBlackDragon480JaysonFour
  • HefflingHeffling No Pic EverRegistered User regular
    Zek wrote: »
    I think the position of Twitter/Facebook/etc on these things has been made pretty clear - politicians are quite literally allowed to break the rules, purportedly because it's important for the public to see that they broke the rules. It'll take more than a little political pressure to make them change their minds on that.

    Politicians are allowed to break the rules because it makes these companies money. If I brought several million $s worth of traffic to Facebook every day, they'd let me say whatever I wanted as well.

    If a movement doesn't have someone that can sit down opposite those in a position of power and strike a deal, how can that movement achieve success?
    Gnome-InterruptusElvenshaeshrykeFencingsaxZonugalLord_AsmodeusDisruptedCapitalistkimeMegaMekJaysonFourHacksaw
  • TryCatcherTryCatcher Registered User regular
    Heffling wrote: »
    Zek wrote: »
    I think the position of Twitter/Facebook/etc on these things has been made pretty clear - politicians are quite literally allowed to break the rules, purportedly because it's important for the public to see that they broke the rules. It'll take more than a little political pressure to make them change their minds on that.

    Politicians are allowed to break the rules because it makes these companies money. If I brought several million $s worth of traffic to Facebook every day, they'd let me say whatever I wanted as well.

    And Donald Trump is the best thing that has happened to Twitter in years, maybe ever.

    TetraNitroCubaneElvenshaeDee KaeMan in the MistsCelestialBadgerKristmas KthulhuGnome-InterruptusMegaMekJaysonFourHacksaw
  • SyphonBlueSyphonBlue Registered User regular
    TryCatcher wrote: »
    Heffling wrote: »
    Zek wrote: »
    I think the position of Twitter/Facebook/etc on these things has been made pretty clear - politicians are quite literally allowed to break the rules, purportedly because it's important for the public to see that they broke the rules. It'll take more than a little political pressure to make them change their minds on that.

    Politicians are allowed to break the rules because it makes these companies money. If I brought several million $s worth of traffic to Facebook every day, they'd let me say whatever I wanted as well.

    And Donald Trump is the best thing that has happened to Twitter in years, maybe ever.

    Until Russia decides to turn off the troll farm, anyway

    LxX6eco.jpg
    PSN/Steam/NNID: SyphonBlue | BNet: SyphonBlue#1126
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  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    To Twitter, security and marketing go hand in hand:
    If ever there was a surefire way to sour users against a two-factor authentication system that was already highly flawed, Twitter has found it. On Tuesday, the social media site said that it used phone numbers and email addresses provided for 2FA protection to tailor ads to users.

    Twitter requires users to provide a valid phone number to be eligible for 2FA protection. A working cell phone number is mandatory even when users' 2FA protection is based solely on security keys or authenticator apps, which don't rely on phone numbers to work. Deleting a phone number from a user's Twitter settings immediately withdraws an account from Twitter 2FA, as I confirmed just prior to publishing this post.

    Security and privacy advocates have long grumbled about this requirement, which isn't a condition of using 2FA protection from Google, Github, and other top-ranked sites. On Tuesday, Twitter gave critics a new reason to complain. The site said it may have inadvertently used email addresses and phone numbers provided for 2FA and other security purposes to match users to marketing lists provided by advertisers. Twitter didn't say if the number of users affected by the blunder was in the hundreds or the millions or how long the improper targeting lasted.

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
    Heffling
  • [Expletive deleted][Expletive deleted] The mediocre doctor NorwayRegistered User regular
    To Twitter, security and marketing go hand in hand:
    If ever there was a surefire way to sour users against a two-factor authentication system that was already highly flawed, Twitter has found it. On Tuesday, the social media site said that it used phone numbers and email addresses provided for 2FA protection to tailor ads to users.

    Twitter requires users to provide a valid phone number to be eligible for 2FA protection. A working cell phone number is mandatory even when users' 2FA protection is based solely on security keys or authenticator apps, which don't rely on phone numbers to work. Deleting a phone number from a user's Twitter settings immediately withdraws an account from Twitter 2FA, as I confirmed just prior to publishing this post.

    Security and privacy advocates have long grumbled about this requirement, which isn't a condition of using 2FA protection from Google, Github, and other top-ranked sites. On Tuesday, Twitter gave critics a new reason to complain. The site said it may have inadvertently used email addresses and phone numbers provided for 2FA and other security purposes to match users to marketing lists provided by advertisers. Twitter didn't say if the number of users affected by the blunder was in the hundreds or the millions or how long the improper targeting lasted.

    Sure, "inadvertently".

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    OrcakimeGnome-InterruptusQanamilDarkPrimusLovelyChiselphaneKayne Red RobeAistanFencingsaxJaysonFourLord_AsmodeusAegisEchoElldrenMoridin889Man in the MistsHacksaw
  • Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    Yeah that’s very clearly not inadvertently. That was probably a whole new value stream with infrastructure set up behind it.

    Gnome-InterruptusElvenshaeFencingsaxAegisToxElldrenMoridin889Man in the MistsHacksaw
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