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[Book]: Rhymes With

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Posts

  • VanguardVanguard A wretched country of duskRegistered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited October 2019
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Yes, the analogy here is that Spotify only has n licenses per song so you have to compete to listen to what you want.

    That would be terrible.

    Spotify is also for profit company with billions of dollars in revenue funded through a mixture of subscribers and global advertising campaigns.

    It’s a bad analogy because it completely ignores the economic realities between public institutions and private companies. Public libraries are not commercial streaming/subscription services, they’re a public resource that offers communities access to knowledge, research, and learning opportunities that are largely funded through philanthropy because taxes aren’t enough to cover their operating cost.

    It also ignores that the libraries are not the ones building these platforms - those are all third party companies. It’s inappropriate to suggest that libraries should get into the tech game given their already dire financial situation and the ire that is directed at them for limiting numbers of digital copies is misplaced as they are not the ones making those decisions.

    Vanguard on
    QuidshrykeBlackDragon480
  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo We are only now beginning to understand the full power and ramifications of sexual intercourse Registered User regular
    Vanguard wrote: »
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Yes, the analogy here is that Spotify only has n licenses per song so you have to compete to listen to what you want.

    That would be terrible.

    Spotify is also for profit company with billions of dollars in revenue funded through a mixture of subscribers and global advertising campaigns.

    It’s a bad analogy because it completely ignores the economic realities between public institutions and private companies. Public libraries are not commercial streaming/subscription services, they’re a public resource that offers communities access to knowledge, research, and learning opportunities that are largely funded through philanthropy because taxes aren’t enough to cover their operating cost.

    It also ignores that the libraries are not the ones building these platforms - those are all third party companies. It’s inappropriate to suggest that libraries should get into the tech game given their already dire financial situation and the ire that is directed at them for limiting numbers of digital copies is misplaced as they are not the ones making those decisions.

    This feels like a circular argument

    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
  • nexuscrawlernexuscrawler Registered User regular
    Artists and publishers get a per play payment from spotify

    Vanguard
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Vanguard wrote: »
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Yes, the analogy here is that Spotify only has n licenses per song so you have to compete to listen to what you want.

    That would be terrible.

    Spotify is also for profit company with billions of dollars in revenue funded through a mixture of subscribers and global advertising campaigns.

    It’s a bad analogy because it completely ignores the economic realities between public institutions and private companies. Public libraries are not commercial streaming/subscription services, they’re a public resource that offers communities access to knowledge, research, and learning opportunities that are largely funded through philanthropy because taxes aren’t enough to cover their operating cost.

    It also ignores that the libraries are not the ones building these platforms - those are all third party companies. It’s inappropriate to suggest that libraries should get into the tech game given their already dire financial situation and the ire that is directed at them for limiting numbers of digital copies is misplaced as they are not the ones making those decisions.

    This feels like a circular argument

    In what possible way?

  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo We are only now beginning to understand the full power and ramifications of sexual intercourse Registered User regular
    shryke wrote: »
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Vanguard wrote: »
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Yes, the analogy here is that Spotify only has n licenses per song so you have to compete to listen to what you want.

    That would be terrible.

    Spotify is also for profit company with billions of dollars in revenue funded through a mixture of subscribers and global advertising campaigns.

    It’s a bad analogy because it completely ignores the economic realities between public institutions and private companies. Public libraries are not commercial streaming/subscription services, they’re a public resource that offers communities access to knowledge, research, and learning opportunities that are largely funded through philanthropy because taxes aren’t enough to cover their operating cost.

    It also ignores that the libraries are not the ones building these platforms - those are all third party companies. It’s inappropriate to suggest that libraries should get into the tech game given their already dire financial situation and the ire that is directed at them for limiting numbers of digital copies is misplaced as they are not the ones making those decisions.

    This feels like a circular argument

    In what possible way?

    We have to use this economic model because this is the economic model that we are using. The original point is that rather than blindly using the previous economic model there is probably room to do better in light of the product format being fundamentally different.

    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    To be clear. I'm not mad at the libraries. I am well aware that they have no control over the situation.

    I think it would make more sense if the licences were just A number of reads. If 100 people want to check it out the first week, then cool. If you only have 100 checkouts, then that's it.

    This probably still wouldn't work because publishers are relying on scarcity to push a bunch of sales.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Vanguard wrote: »
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Yes, the analogy here is that Spotify only has n licenses per song so you have to compete to listen to what you want.

    That would be terrible.

    Spotify is also for profit company with billions of dollars in revenue funded through a mixture of subscribers and global advertising campaigns.

    It’s a bad analogy because it completely ignores the economic realities between public institutions and private companies. Public libraries are not commercial streaming/subscription services, they’re a public resource that offers communities access to knowledge, research, and learning opportunities that are largely funded through philanthropy because taxes aren’t enough to cover their operating cost.

    It also ignores that the libraries are not the ones building these platforms - those are all third party companies. It’s inappropriate to suggest that libraries should get into the tech game given their already dire financial situation and the ire that is directed at them for limiting numbers of digital copies is misplaced as they are not the ones making those decisions.

    This feels like a circular argument

    In what possible way?

    We have to use this economic model because this is the economic model that we are using. The original point is that rather than blindly using the previous economic model there is probably room to do better in light of the product format being fundamentally different.

    Then you should probably explain what alternative you want and how it would be sustainable. Because the argument against you is not circular and it's just pointing out that your proposal does not seem viable.

  • Satanic JesusSatanic Jesus Hi, I'm Liam! Registered User regular
    Sabriel is one of my most reread books. I even bought my sister a copy.

    my backloggery 3DS: 0533-5338-5186 steam: porcelain_cow goodreads
    credeiki
  • BogartBogart Gonna Be A Man In Motion Registered User, Moderator mod
    Finished On. Thought I'd read it before but nope. A very rough read in places. Roberts doesn't just tree his protagonists and throw rocks at them, he pulls out a high-powered rifle and aims carefully for the head.

  • credeikicredeiki Registered User regular
    Mahnmut wrote: »
    credeiki wrote: »
    I am rereading Sabriel for the Nth time and it remains one of the coolest and most suspenseful (thrilling? Lots of action and forward drive and a sense that the protagonist is never safe) fantasy books.

    I suppose, if I look at the book with a critical eye, Sabriel herself does not have much of an inner life. She is an extremely competent and collected person, and you’re told yeah she had friends at boarding school and was thinking about going to university after, but that’s basically all the detail you get, and she just no question sets off into the old kingdom for the first time since childhood at the beginning of the book. She has never pressed about why she was sent into ancelstierre as a child, never was sad or uneasy about her absentee dad or being a weirdo from abroad and similarly isn’t worried about not fitting in when she returns.

    In the sequel, Lirael has all sorts of internal life, and the book is also much longer and still good but a bit less exciting. And it is true that (especially compared to Lirael heh) Sabriel is just a person with a lot of confidence and not a lot of anxiety so perhaps there’s not all that much to dwell on as she fights the dead and walks around the best old house and wears embroidered surcoats.

    I love this book!

    You had me at embroidered surcoats! Tossing this onto my list.

    It is a really exciting adventure and it has the coolest necromancy I’ve ever seen. Every setting element is just fantastic and the read is captivating. Recommend recommend recommend to anyone who enjoys a fantasy book.

    Steam, LoL: credeiki
    MahnmutFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Oooh, lets talk about chemistry Registered User regular
    Artists and publishers get a per play payment from spotify

    I was under the impression they get a "% of total plays" pay. So if they get 1 million plays and it's 1% of the total plays, they get paid less than 500,000 plays if it's 2% of the total.

  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    edited October 2019
    @Richy

    The Bobiverse is a three book series about an engineer who has his body cryogenically frozen following a car accident, comes to after his brain state was scanned and uploaded to a computer, and he's used as the sentient intelligence for a theocratic ethno state's Von Neumann probe.

    It's light reading and pretty fun. Tons of transhumanism and space travel. My only complaint is that his narration absolutely sounds like an engineer. But that's just a feature for others.

    Quid on
    Richy
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Finished Gideon the Ninth and didn't really care for it, personally. I love the main character and think the setting is interesting, but the whole scenario felt really contrived.

    It also didn't help that I listened to the audiobook which isn't super conducive to keeping track of over a dozen characters with three or four different names or titles used to address them.

  • nexuscrawlernexuscrawler Registered User regular
    I can imagine. There's alot of characters an audiobook would get confusing very fast.

    Quid
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    I'll definitely check out the next one in written form. There's a ton of potential there.

  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    Honestly I confused some names/characters while reading the thing. It definitely has a huge cast that you get drowned in over the course of like a single chapter.

    Unsure if it was intended as a thing with POV but I definitely sympathized with them.

    Nod. Get treat. PSN: Quippish
  • nexuscrawlernexuscrawler Registered User regular
    Yeah I needed to check the character list a couple of times at the start.

  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    I'm listening to Spin which is fascinating so far. Only complaint is that as nice as he sounds, Scott Brick's voice sounds out of place.

  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Children of Ruin is pretty good but it kind of meanders. Feels like the author stretched himself a bit thin with all the different perspectives.

    There's some amazingly terrifying body horror halfway through. The epilogue is a beautiful ending too.

    swaylow
  • BogartBogart Gonna Be A Man In Motion Registered User, Moderator mod
    The Drawing of the Dark, by Tim Powers. Good stuff, with an engagingly odd and earthy take on what constitutes the holiest of substances.

    Ataxrxes
  • Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud Registered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    Children of Ruin is pretty good but it kind of meanders. Feels like the author stretched himself a bit thin with all the different perspectives.

    There's some amazingly terrifying body horror halfway through. The epilogue is a beautiful ending too.
    I just relistened to Children of Time. Still a great book. Beginning Children of Ruin on audiobook tonight. I like the first chapter.
    Also the sequel to Semiosis - Inheritance came out a week ago. Now I have two books to get through during my workday!

    Quid
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    Children of Ruin is pretty good but it kind of meanders. Feels like the author stretched himself a bit thin with all the different perspectives.

    There's some amazingly terrifying body horror halfway through. The epilogue is a beautiful ending too.
    I just relistened to Children of Time. Still a great book. Beginning Children of Ruin on audiobook tonight. I like the first chapter.
    Also the sequel to Semiosis - Inheritance came out a week ago. Now I have two books to get through during my workday!

    Yussssss

    I love these books with alien POVs working out what to do with humans.

    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloudswaylow
  • Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud Registered User regular
    That and first contact SciFi are my jam.

  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    I am currently being charmed by This is how you lose the Time War. It is delightful.

    Nod. Get treat. PSN: Quippish
    swaylowMahnmutMaguanoAntoshkaPowerpuppies
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    @Fuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud it's Interference not Inheritance

  • Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud Registered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    @Fuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud it's Interference not Inheritance
    Whoooops.

  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Finished the first chapter of Interference last night.
    That's fucking horrific.

  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    Shards of Honor is the book that I should read after Falling Free, correct?

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
  • TaminTamin Registered User regular
    yep.

  • KanaKana Registered User regular
    edited October 2019
    I was recommended Gideon the Ninth, so I went into it completely blind without even reading the back cover. That was a very excellent way to go into it, and I would quite recommend going into it the same way. It was really imaginative and clever and funny, the writing is quite good at anticipating audience expectations and playing with them.

    The longer pitch would be:
    So there's a very Warhammer 40k immortal God-Emperor out in space somewhere, and he rules over 9 houses of space necromancers. Gideon's a foundling in the small, gloomy ninth house, who all live on a big ol' tomb planet which is unbearably gothic and everyone dresses and talks like they're an NPC from Dark Souls. Gideon is an exception and therefore everyone hates her, a jocky teenage rebel who likes swords and dirty girly magazines, she desperately wants to escape off the planet by enlisting in the space marines cohort, who are off in space somewhere fighting an apparently neverending war against... Something? Gideon's arch-frenemy is the also teenaged necromancer princess of the ninth house, Harrowhark Nonagesimus, who's exactly as goth as you would expect from her name. Much to everyone's surprise, the emperor sends the ninth house a letter - he needs new recruits to be his immortal lieutenants, and the heirs of each house (along with their chosen bodyguard, their "cavalier") are all invited. Since the ninth house's cavalier is usually more of a Igor type who goes around fetching bodies and drooling, and they don't want to embarrass themselves in front of the other houses, Gideon is blackmailed/recruited into being Harrowhark's impromptu cavalier. So they fly off to a relatively much less gloomy planet, along with 7 other couples from the other houses... and are then pretty much just left to their own devices. Is this whole thing a collaborative puzzle? Is it The Hunger Games and the last house standing wins? And then someone dies, and the whole thing morphs into a very good dinner party murder mystery, with space necromancers.

    It was very good, I burned through it in like 2 days.

    Kana on
    A trap is for fish: when you've got the fish, you can forget the trap. A snare is for rabbits: when you've got the rabbit, you can forget the snare. Words are for meaning: when you've got the meaning, you can forget the words.
    nexuscrawlertapeslingerW2
  • OneAngryPossumOneAngryPossum Registered User regular
    I’m 200 pages into The Three Body Problem and continue to have no idea what this is all about, but damn it’s got several hooks into me.

    I know it’s a trilogy, but do the individual books tend to wrap up nicely/neatly? Just trying to set expectations.

    DoodmannPhaserlight
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    I’m 200 pages into The Three Body Problem and continue to have no idea what this is all about, but damn it’s got several hooks into me.

    I know it’s a trilogy, but do the individual books tend to wrap up nicely/neatly? Just trying to set expectations.

    I've only read the first but...no?

    It felt like a good ending place but things are not nice or neat.

    Nod. Get treat. PSN: Quippish
    Drovekchrono_travellerBlackDragon480
  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    edited November 2019
    Edit: Thought I was in the movie thread, whoops!

    On topic contribution...

    I'm currently reading Magic for Liars by Sarah Gailey. It's pretty good! Very obviously a first novel but they have a lot of promise and it's an interestingly subdued take on the whole urban fantasy thing.

    Also listening to Dead Moon by Peter Clines, which is pretty much exactly what you'd expect from a novel about zombies on the moon. Fun and fast-paced but not exactly high literature.

    CptHamilton on
    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
    Redcoat-13
  • DrovekDrovek Registered User regular
    edited November 2019
    I’m 200 pages into The Three Body Problem and continue to have no idea what this is all about, but damn it’s got several hooks into me.

    I know it’s a trilogy, but do the individual books tend to wrap up nicely/neatly? Just trying to set expectations.

    Ball Lightning has a bit nicer wrapping up, and while the middle is a bit slow, if you like the style of Three-Body you'll like it.

    Drovek on
    steam_sig.png
    OneAngryPossum
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    edited November 2019
    I'm currently reading Magic for Liars by Sarah Gailey. It's pretty good! Very obviously a first novel but she has a lot of promise and it's an interestingly subdued take on the whole urban fantasy thing.

    They've written at least two other novels. They are the one who wrote about the hippo ranching scheme in the Mississippi in River of Teeth and the sequel.

    DevoutlyApathetic on
    Nod. Get treat. PSN: Quippish
  • Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud Registered User regular
    Magic for Liars is on my list after my Husband recommended it.

    I just finished Children of Ruin. Honestly, it is a complete retread of the first book but I didn't mind at all because it was still really fun to experience it all with new sentiences. I am looking forward to the third book.

    Now I am on to Semiosis: Interference.

    Quid
  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    I'm currently reading Magic for Liars by Sarah Gailey. It's pretty good! Very obviously a first novel but she has a lot of promise and it's an interestingly subdued take on the whole urban fantasy thing.

    She's written at least two other novels. She's the one who wrote about the hippo ranching scheme in the Mississippi in River of Teeth and the sequel.

    Ah. The person who recommended it to me said it was a first novel and I didn't bother actually checking.

    I'm a bit less impressed in that case. It's still decent but the characterization is a bit more melodramatic and uneven than I'd expect for a third published novel.

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
  • OneAngryPossumOneAngryPossum Registered User regular
    edited November 2019
    I’m 200 pages into The Three Body Problem and continue to have no idea what this is all about, but damn it’s got several hooks into me.

    I know it’s a trilogy, but do the individual books tend to wrap up nicely/neatly? Just trying to set expectations.

    I've only read the first but...no?

    It felt like a good ending place but things are not nice or neat.

    That should do just fine - more wondering if each book offers some sense of closure/completion, or if it’s a trilogy that requires the whole package before coming together.

    Which would also be fine! This is very much my alley.

    OneAngryPossum on
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    I’m 200 pages into The Three Body Problem and continue to have no idea what this is all about, but damn it’s got several hooks into me.

    I know it’s a trilogy, but do the individual books tend to wrap up nicely/neatly? Just trying to set expectations.

    I've only read the first but...no?

    It felt like a good ending place but things are not nice or neat.

    That should do just fine - more wondering if each book offers some sense of closure/completion, or if it’s a trilogy that requires the whole package before coming together.

    Which would also be fine! This is very much my alley.

    Each book finishes its individual story, but at the same time leaves a question for the following book to answer. Also, characters don't really follow over between novels, at least not much, which is a little disjointing.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
    OneAngryPossumDrovekFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud
  • tapeslingertapeslinger Space Unicorn Slush Ranger Social Justice Rebel ScumRegistered User regular
    (just a note: Sarah Gailey uses they pronouns and I'm pretty sure they have at least four books, but it's spread between between novels and novellas? American Hippo is the collected pair of novellas iirc but there's also Fisher of Bones which I think was out through Fireside. Magic for Liars is I think classed as a debut because it was their first full length novel sale? Publishing is wild like that)

    DevoutlyApatheticA Dabble Of Thelonius
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