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Kitten Thread part 1^n (Kitten goes into a berserker rage)

GrundlestiltskinGrundlestiltskin Behind you!Registered User regular
edited August 2009 in Help / Advice Forum
So after much discussion, my girlfriend and I are heading down to the animal shelter today to get our first cat. We want to get a kitty, raise it right, etc etc. A few questions.

1. Beyond its initial vaccines and whether or not it's spayed/neutered, what other questions should I be asking the shelter?
2. What kinds of things should I have for the cat immediately? Litter box, scratching post, some toys, anything else? What kind of food should I be buying for it off the bat?
3. Housebreaking - best ways to do it?
4. Discipline - What are the best ways to get a kitten to stop doing things it shouldn't? I'm mostly concerned about the cat scratching up the couch and chewing on power cables. Thoughts?

Oh, there will be pics. Eventually.

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Posts

  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Congrats, my cat is from the Boston animal shelter and I'm thinking about getting her a friend. Dinah took right to her litter box, most cats should, it's probably been using a litter box at the shelter. I'm assuming you've already done the paperwork as most shelters have a wait period or 24-48 hours after the initial paperwork to give you time to be certain you want the pet. They weren't giving her anything in particular so I put her on Kitten Chow and now she's on Cat Chow. She used to love wet food (it was her once a week treat) but now she doesn't touch it. If it's a kitten then you shouldn't be giving it wet food for now anyway. If the cat is chewing or scratching then sour apple spray should do the trick.

    Under no circumstances declaw the cat.

    I use the Merwin Memorial Free Clinic, they charge you cost for any medications and just ask for a donation for the services.

    Make sure you bring a carrier to the shelter unless you're going to the MSPCA where they'll give you a cardboard box to take the cat home in. It might take the cat sometime to get cozy in your place. Dinah hid under the couch for an hour until she came out and started exploring.


    Which shelter are you getting the cat from?

    VisionOfClarity on
  • RenegadeSilenceRenegadeSilence Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    1) Well you could ask what kind of food you should be feeding it :P Sorry it's been several years since I adopted my cat.

    2)I bought a collar with a bell on it, just because she was so small and she would just disappear hours at a time going into the various nooks and crannys of my house, took it off when she was too big to fit into that stuff.

    3)In my experience I didn't need to house break my cat I just plopped it near the litter box so she would have the knowledge of where it was. However one of my friends had a few potted plants moved out for a few weeks, because the kitty would initially go in those as well.

    4)A spray bottle works depending on the cat, encourage it to use the post. You can also mix a lemon/water concoction and apply it to surfaces you don't want it to be on/bite.

    Yeah don't declaw your cat I was in the process of getting my cat to use the post and was making progress, then had to leave for a week and found that my mom declawed my cat. I was pissed and her personality noticeably changed, she became more bitey, impatient, and less friendly.

    EDIT: Now that I think of it I think the humane society told me to add water to her dry food and feed that to her, still won't hurt to ask.

    RenegadeSilence on
  • GrundlestiltskinGrundlestiltskin Behind you!Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Congrats, my cat is from the Boston animal shelter and I'm thinking about getting her a friend. Dinah took right to her litter box, most cats should, it's probably been using a litter box at the shelter. I'm assuming you've already done the paperwork as most shelters have a wait period or 24-48 hours after the initial paperwork to give you time to be certain you want the pet. They weren't giving her anything in particular so I put her on Kitten Chow and now she's on Cat Chow. She used to love wet food (it was her once a week treat) but now she doesn't touch it. If it's a kitten then you shouldn't be giving it wet food for now anyway. If the cat is chewing or scratching then sour apple spray should do the trick.

    Under no circumstances declaw the cat.

    I use the Merwin Memorial Free Clinic, they charge you cost for any medications and just ask for a donation for the services.

    Make sure you bring a carrier to the shelter unless you're going to the MSPCA where they'll give you a cardboard box to take the cat home in. It might take the cat sometime to get cozy in your place. Dinah hid under the couch for an hour until she came out and started exploring.


    Which shelter are you getting the cat from?

    I did not actually know about the paperwork, that'll be a pain in the ass since we both work during the week. I'll work something out, maybe work from home one day so I can pick it up I suppose. We're definitely sure about the cat, we've been talking about this for well over a year.

    We would never think about declawing the cat, just trying to find ways to encourage it to find healthier scratching outlets than my couch.

    Good point about the cat carrier, I was wondering about that. We're planning to hit a pet store before we head down that way.

    We were going to head to the shelter in Roslindale, it's only a few miles from here.

    Grundlestiltskin on
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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    That shelter is the same one I got my cat from! Make sure you bring your lease that shows you are allowed a pet in your place, they require this.

    You go in and see the cats, then you fill out the paperwork and they will approve you then in 48 hours (48 hours that they're open for adoptions, not just 48 hours) you can get the cat. So if you went in today if the adoption person didn't get to process the paperwork today, they would on Tuesday and you'd hear from them around Thursday and would get the cat the first time you could after that.

    Definitely bring the carrier because they don't provide one. It's a very streamlined process and when I get Dinah a little friend it will definitely be from there.

    My cat came spayed and with all of her shots, it wasn't until May (10 months later) that she needed to get more.

    VisionOfClarity on
  • GrundlestiltskinGrundlestiltskin Behind you!Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    That shelter is the same one I got my cat from! Make sure you bring your lease that shows you are allowed a pet in your place, they require this.

    Yeah I have my lease which says we're permitted one cat, though I don't have a specific letter of permission from the landlord (they mention this on the website). Hopefully it's not a huge issue since it is specifically referenced in the lease.

    Grundlestiltskin on
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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    That shelter is the same one I got my cat from! Make sure you bring your lease that shows you are allowed a pet in your place, they require this.

    Yeah I have my lease which says we're permitted one cat, though I don't have a specific letter of permission from the landlord (they mention this on the website). Hopefully it's not a huge issue since it is specifically referenced in the lease.

    If it's specifically mentioned then it's ok. Mine didn't say so I had to have the management company fax them a letter.

    VisionOfClarity on
  • AsiinaAsiina ... WaterlooRegistered User regular
    edited June 2009
    A shame you can't get two cats, as its always nice for cats to have a buddy.

    I know with our humane society my cats needed to leave in a carrying case and then needed to have collars on, even if I wasn't keeping the collars on them all the time. It was for the identification tag. The cardboard case they'll either give you or you can buy it for a few dollars. You can probably buy the collars there too.

    Along with everything else you buy, get something that they can perch on and hide in. Mine had this box in their cage that the shelter let me keep. It doesn't have to be complicated.

    As for deterring behaviour, understand that this is a kitten and your efforts will mostly be useless. Also that (s)he will stop doing most bad things eventually. It's more worth your while to kitten-proof the house than try to prevent bad behaviour. but watch and see what kind of mischief the cat gets up to first. Every cat is different and their destructiveness is individual as well.

    They'll probably tell you this at the shelter, but keep the cat isolated in a small room for at least a day before letting it run around the house. Moving into a new place can be scary and it's better to let them get used to new surroundings gradually.

    Obligatory cat picture, sitting in the aforementioned box given by the shelter:

    47956252145587559040300.jpg

    Asiina on
  • The LandoStanderThe LandoStander Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    It may be a little late but it should be noted that Kittens require A LOT of work and leaving them alone isn't the same as leaving an adult cat alone. The kitten will pee, claw and poop quite a bit more than an adult cat that's litter trained to begin with.

    Adult cats often have a tougher time getting adopted so you might consider getting a slightly older cat. You get the benefit of him/her having already been through the kitten illnesses and vaccines as well as the probability of them being house trained. Plus you're helping out a cat that might not be as adoptable as a cute little kitten.

    If a kitten is the only option you're willing to go for you should look into getting some training pads. Most pet stores and I think even Target has them. While you're out at work, it'd be a good idea to close the kitten off in a small room with a training pad, water and such so it doesn't get into anything.

    De-Clawing is kind of controversial. If you're planning on raising an Indoor/Outdoor cat then it's a no-no. But if you're planning on keeping your cat indoors at all times then a front de-clawing isn't a horrible idea. There's actually a new laser procedure that's more or less replacing the old approach of yanking the claws out. The recovery time is a few days as opposed to the old method. My local vet mentioned that she doesn't even do the old removal method anymore. Never have the back claws taken out though, those are the claws that a cat really uses to defend itself. My cat's previous owners didn't really know how to raise cats so he's completely de-clawed and we have to always keep an eye on him so he doesn't get out.

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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    He lives in Boston, it would be absolutely insane to let his cat outside. That's how pets get lost or killed around here. The application asks if you plan on letting it outside (you won't get one if you do because that's irresponsible) and if you plan to declaw (you won't get one because it's cruel). If you are getting a cat and plan on declawing it then get an old cat that had a terrible owner that already declawed it. There is no reason to declaw a cat other than you just don't feel like trimming or capping and if you're that lazy you shouldn't get a cat.

    VisionOfClarity on
  • ascannerlightlyascannerlightly Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Under no circumstances declaw the cat.

    ascannerlightly on
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  • NappuccinoNappuccino Surveyor of Things and Stuff Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Under no circumstances declaw the cat.

    I'd be inclined to agree... my parents wouldn't let my sister and I get a cat without him/her being partially declawed (why? I have no idea, my mom refuses to let them in the house) but, wanting a couple of kittens, my sister and I agreed.

    After the procedure, neither cat was the same and one pretty much hates everybody but me and my sister now... and even our relationship is iffy.

    I'd say only declaw them if you absolutely have to.

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  • PeenPeen Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Since nobody's said this yet, I wouldn't close off the option of adopting an adult cat. Kittens are fun and it's neat to see them grow up, it's true, but sometimes adult cats are in more need of adoption than kittens (because people don't want them) and they can be as good as any kitten you'd have gotten. We got our second cat as an adult and she's as sweet as can be, more so than the cat we've had since he was tiny. I'd say keep an open mind and get the cat you like the best, no matter how old it is.

    Peen on
  • RazielRaziel Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    It's a pretty awful procedure, in which they chop off the top knuckle.

    Here's a hot tip re: claw clipping. Gently touch and play with the cat's paws while you're playing with the cat. It'll get the animal used to having its paws touched. Do the clipping yourself, holding the cat gently on all fours and raising one paw at a time. Kittens will usually just go along with it - it may whine and nip, but the more you do it, the more accustomed the animal will get.

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  • JansonJanson Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I've also heard good things about soft paws.

    Janson on
  • DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
    edited June 2009
    I've heard good things about soft paws too, thinking of getting them for my cat next time we head to the vet.

    Unknown User on
  • oncelingonceling Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    When the cat first comes home you need to feed it what it's been fed at the shelter.

    Later, you should choose the best food you can afford. You can slowly mix the old shelter food with your new choice food over 1-2 weeks putting more of the new into the mix each day.

    Here's a list I saved that someone else put together before I got my cats. They are sorted by their ingredients. I am sure someone will come by and tell you there's no reason to get premium food and Walmart's home brand has kept their cat alive for 15 years. Sure, people can eat McDonalds every day too and be perfectly fine. If junk food containing filler that your cat doesn't have the ability to digest is good enough for you, then that's your decision. Just make it knowing the difference.

    Ultra Premium (regular)

    Solid Gold
    Innova
    California Natural
    Nature's Variety Prairie
    Natural Balance
    Wellness
    Evanger's (makes only wet) (NOT the vegetarian formula, duh.)
    Tiki Cat (makes only wet)
    Wysong (wet)

    Ultra Premium (grain-free)
    Innova EVO
    Before Grain (B.G.), made by Merrick
    Now! Grain Free
    Wellness CORE
    Nature's Variety Instinct
    Taste of the Wild

    Premium
    Chicken Soup
    Blue Buffalo
    Merrick (wet)
    Pet Promise (wet)
    Newman's Own Organics
    Felidae
    Diamond Naturals (dry)

    Good
    Eagle Pack
    Royal Canin
    Wysong (dry)
    Pet Promise (dry)

    Acceptable
    Iams
    Science Diet
    Eukanuba
    Purina One
    Diamond
    Nutro
    Trader Joe's
    Whole Paws

    Not acceptable
    Fancy Feast
    Sheba
    Cat Chow
    Whiskas
    Meow Mix
    Special Kitty, or whatever Wal-Mart calls its house brand
    Store Brands
    Anything that includes the words "meat" or "animal" in its ingredients list

    onceling on
  • Raiden333Raiden333 Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    In my experience growing up with quite a few pets over the years, if you get a kitten without a second for him/her to play with, expect it to be batshit crazy.

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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I got a kitten without a second one and she was fine because she got toys and plenty of attention.

    VisionOfClarity on
  • oldsakoldsak Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Housebreaking a kitten is easy, just drop it in the litter box and it's good to go.

    One thing new cat owners don't usually do is make an effort to teach the kitten its name right away. To teach a new kitten its name, stroke its head while its eating and repeat its name. Keep this up for a while and the kitten will learn to associate its name with food and come when you call it.

    oldsak on
  • Aoi TsukiAoi Tsuki Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Ditto on getting an older cat, though it is kitten season. Still, cute little'ns get adopted quicker than adults, so.

    Every single one of my cats has learned to come when called - via kissing noises or "Kitty kitty" - regardless of intelligence, thanks to the power of turkey lunchmeat and/or tuna: crouch near the cat with some in your hand, make the noise, and let them sniff/eat it. Back away, let them forget you have it (or just repeat some other time, if they're too persistent), and do it again. Works like a charm, and you can always get ahold of them for whatever nefarious purposes you like. (Try not to overuse it for things they hate, or you'll undo the positive association. Depends on the individual cat's ability to hold a grudge.)

    Aoi Tsuki on
  • GrundlestiltskinGrundlestiltskin Behind you!Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Thanks for the good tips all, appreciated :D

    We put in an application for a cute kitten, we're the second applicants though so I don't know if we'll get it or not until I call on Monday. Other than that we'll probably wait until the new kittens are ready for adoption in a few weeks. I'd like to watch a kitten grow up, so I'm not super interested in adopting an older cat. Plus all of the stuff we bought from Petco on the way home is too small for a big cat.


    The cat we put in an application for is a girl kitty. My gf wants to name it Leela after the girl from Futurama. I wanted to call it Leelu after the girl from the 5th element. I don't know if this is going to cause a kitty identity crisis or not.

    Grundlestiltskin on
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  • NappuccinoNappuccino Surveyor of Things and Stuff Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I think leelu was the name of the female norwal in the futurama movie that was to represent leela to the future fry's past future. Or something. If that's true, you might be able to strike a middle ground on the name that way.Either way, both names are close enough.

    Good luck with your new kitten.

    Nappuccino on
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    Rorus Raz wrote: »
    There's also the possibility you just can't really grow a bear like other guys.

    Not even BEAR vaginas can defeat me!
    cakemikz wrote: »
    And then I rub actual cake on myself.
    Loomdun wrote: »
    thats why you have chest helmets
  • Aurora BorealisAurora Borealis runs and runs and runs away BrooklynRegistered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I got my cat super young and had the best of times training her. I really wanted to take her camping with me. This entailed several things. She had to be harness trained and okay with riding in cars. Also had to keep her shots updated and have paperwork proof.
    Anyway I harness trained her by making tiny harnesses out of yarn because she was too small for the store bought one. I put one on her every time she went out into the hallway of my apartment building. She liked going into the hall way because she is really social and totally ate up all the attention from the neighbors. Also there was lots of room to run around and play with toys. A laser pointer was a big hit here.
    So she got to associate the harness with good things and now I don't have to fight her to get it on. She'll sulk for a bit because she doesn't like the feeling, but she gets over it as soon as we go do something.
    And she loves camping. She gets lots of attention, she's outside, and there are lots of things to look at and lots of bugs to chase. It's the best thing ever.

    Also when she was tiny I used to give her baths all the time. Not full on shampoo baths, because that's bad for their skin to do too often. but about once a week I'd hold her gently under the tap and get her body (not her head) wet. Accompanied by lots of petting and nice words and treats before and after. This was all when she was small enough she couldn't do too much damage. Now that she's bigger and theoretically could rip my arm to shreds, she doesn't. She only gets baths now like once every 6 to 9 months, when she gets into something messy or whatnot. I can't say she likes them, but they are tolerated and she's not afraid of water.

    And it's a really good idea to have a noise or call that you make everytime you feed her. My cat always comes when I do a pursed lips chirp thing, because it almost always means something good in store for her. This is very handy, like if she'd hiding somewhere and I want to know whee she is so I can make sure she's not in trouble.

    One thing I have to say is don't let the kitten play bite you. That's one mistake I made. It's cute when they are tiny, but once they're grown it HURTS and it's much harder to break them of the habit then. If she bites you, stop all play until she's calmed down. That's the only thing I've found that works.

    Aurora Borealis on
  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    And it's a really good idea to have a noise or call that you make everytime you feed her. My cat always comes when I do a pursed lips chirp thing, because it almost always means something good in store for her. This is very handy, like if she'd hiding somewhere and I want to know whee she is so I can make sure she's not in trouble.

    This works for about a few months, then the cat realizes she's not getting food and stops coming.

    VisionOfClarity on
  • NappuccinoNappuccino Surveyor of Things and Stuff Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    And it's a really good idea to have a noise or call that you make everytime you feed her. My cat always comes when I do a pursed lips chirp thing, because it almost always means something good in store for her. This is very handy, like if she'd hiding somewhere and I want to know whee she is so I can make sure she's not in trouble.

    This works for about a few months, then the cat realizes she's not getting food and stops coming.

    Well, you have to keep giving her food and attention every so often even after she "knows" her name to keep the learned behavior up.

    Granted, my cat still seems to "know" her name. She'll turn her head when we call her but she is too damn lazy to get up and walk on over to us :D.

    Nappuccino on
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    Rorus Raz wrote: »
    There's also the possibility you just can't really grow a bear like other guys.

    Not even BEAR vaginas can defeat me!
    cakemikz wrote: »
    And then I rub actual cake on myself.
    Loomdun wrote: »
    thats why you have chest helmets
  • chromdomchromdom Who? Where?Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Also when she was tiny I used to give her baths all the time. Not full on shampoo baths, because that's bad for their skin to do too often. but about once a week I'd hold her gently under the tap and get her body (not her head) wet. Accompanied by lots of petting and nice words and treats before and after. This was all when she was small enough she couldn't do too much damage. Now that she's bigger and theoretically could rip my arm to shreds, she doesn't. She only gets baths now like once every 6 to 9 months, when she gets into something messy or whatnot. I can't say she likes them, but they are tolerated and she's not afraid of water.

    My brother's cats shower with him every morning.

    My brother's cats are weird.

    chromdom on
  • RainbulimicRainbulimic Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    You might want to ask if they've been de-wormed.
    My vet initially gave me de-worming paste to put in my kitten's food, but the last visit I was given a spot-on solution that treats fleas, ticks, larvae, roundworm, heartworm, hookworm and something my vet warned me about called Lungworm that I'd never heard of. She said it was carried in and passed on by snails as well, but I'm not sure.
    It's probably best not the let your kitten out into the world (if he/she's gonna be an outdoor kitty) before you're sure they've had some sort of parasite treatment.

    Also, ask your vet about getting the kitten chipped (especially if they're going to be allowed outside) just in case it runs away/gets lost/gets kittennapped. It's quick and lasts forever and not particularly expensive. Microchip the size of a grain of rice in the skin at the back of its neck with all your details on.

    If you get your kitten a collar I'd recommend one with elastic or a safety clasp or something just because a long time ago, one of my cats got her collar caught on a bush and almost hung herself.

    Rainbulimic on
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  • JansonJanson Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Yes, lungworm is transmitted by snails.

    Rainbulimic's advice is great. Microchipping is a good idea; even if you're keeping the kitten as an indoor kitten, you never know when they may manage to sneak outside. Plus, if your cat is anything like any of the cats my parents have owned, ever, they'll be able to get any collar off in less than an hour.

    Janson on
  • GrundlestiltskinGrundlestiltskin Behind you!Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    We live in downtown Boston, under no circumstances will this cat be allowed outside.

    Grundlestiltskin on
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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    My cat came chipped and since the OP is going to the same shelter I believe his will come chipped too. It's like an $18 activation fee.

    VisionOfClarity on
  • GrundlestiltskinGrundlestiltskin Behind you!Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Chipped?

    Grundlestiltskin on
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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Essentially Kitty GPS.

    VisionOfClarity on
  • mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    if you register the chip with 24petwatch.com its free and they take any chip manufacturer

    mts on
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  • Local H JayLocal H Jay Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    seriously?
    they put tracking devices in kittens now?

    fucking sweet

    Local H Jay on
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited June 2009
    seriously?
    they put tracking devices in kittens now?

    fucking sweet

    Herding them, however, is still a bitch.

    MichaelLC on
  • JansonJanson Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    We live in downtown Boston, under no circumstances will this cat be allowed outside.
    That's why I also said if it manages to escape; cats are quick and wily.

    My parents' cat went missing for a week; someone found him and brought him to a local vet and within five minutes they were able to contact my parents; vets and shelters will always check for a microchip first on any stray animal brought in to see them.

    Janson on
  • FiggyFiggy Fighter of the night man Champion of the sunRegistered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Nappuccino wrote: »
    And it's a really good idea to have a noise or call that you make everytime you feed her. My cat always comes when I do a pursed lips chirp thing, because it almost always means something good in store for her. This is very handy, like if she'd hiding somewhere and I want to know whee she is so I can make sure she's not in trouble.

    This works for about a few months, then the cat realizes she's not getting food and stops coming.

    Well, you have to keep giving her food and attention every so often even after she "knows" her name to keep the learned behavior up.

    Granted, my cat still seems to "know" her name. She'll turn her head when we call her but she is too damn lazy to get up and walk on over to us :D.

    My cat will come to us from wherever she is in the house when we call her name. It's not expecting food either.. it just shows up and meows inquisitively.

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  • underdonkunderdonk __BANNED USERS regular
    edited June 2009
    Also, make sure you don't shelter the cat too much. Otherwise, when it inevitably goes away to school, it will go fucking crazy.

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  • DrZiplockDrZiplock Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Doesn't matter if the kitten is ever going to be an outdoor cat, in fact, that's the primary reason to get the cat chipped.

    You're looking at a creature who once outside will freak the fuck out. Hide, run, pretty much be a giant mess because they've never experienced it.

    My cats don't go outside either, but during a move once, one of them took for the damned door and I couldn't find him for over 3 hours. This was at night and only 6 or so hours before I packed up to leave the area.

    Yea. I was freaking the fuck out.

    Get the cat chipped so if he gets out and if he gets found there's the chance that he'll make it back to you if someone picks him up and he's not wearing a collar.


    Also,
    I had both of my boys front declawed. Most people will tell you don't do it, some people will tell you it's up to you. I doubt anyone will tell you that you really have to do it. It's a personal choice. Someone in this thread mentioned that they chop it off at the knuckle. That's how vets used to do it. There are three procedures that come to mind for the declawing of a cat. Two that I can't abide by and one that is significantly more feline friendly (in comparison).

    The choice is essentially yours and should be made after spending a little time living with your kitten. You will likely be able to train the cat properly as you're getting a very young cat.

    If it is a road you go down, do your research, talk to you vet, think it over. I went around to a few different places, talked about how it was done, discussed pain management afterwards, etc. Within a day of the procedure my boys were back to themselves and being awesome. Though, I timed mine with the neutering as well.

    DrZiplock on
  • GrundlestiltskinGrundlestiltskin Behind you!Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Can anyone who's used SoftPaws tell me more about them? They seem like a good alternative to declawing, but I'm a bit skeptical about the efficacy of gluing plastic to kitten claws both in terms of staying on and not driving the cat insane.

    Grundlestiltskin on
    3DS FC: 2079-6424-8577 | PSN: KaeruX65 | Steam: Karulytic | FFXIV: Wonder Boy
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