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There is a [Conspiracy Thread] here, and I will seek it out!

1246761

Posts

  • Jealous DevaJealous Deva Registered User regular
    zagdrob wrote: »
    Hevach wrote: »
    furlion wrote: »
    Damn got hit with the update bug so here is my post to try and fix it. In keeping with the spirit of the thread I remember when conspiracy theories where just harmless bullshit like we didn't land on the moon and 9/11 was an inside job. The radicalization of conspiracy theorist to causing actual harm to people is not something I would have ever predicted.

    The internet has made it easier to see the disgusting layers, but it's not new. The original reasons behind the moon landing theory were wrapped up in holocaust denial and white supremacy, and 9/11 was all a out Jews from the get go.

    Going back farther, the Pearl Harbor theories (from false flag to intentionally allowing it to proceed) were also tightly in with Holocaust denial and the strong pro-Nazi right wing in the US.

    It used to be fun to read about them, but actually digging into them has always gone dark places.

    If you go to a Rolling Stones concert and the lights go down but you haven't heard Satisfaction...the show isn't over.

    Similarly, if a Conspiracy Theory hasn't gotten to 'The Jews', you haven't heard the whole theory.

    You might in some cases get the barely coded 'Globalist' or 'George Soros' wording, but pretty much one of the universal threads in at least the past 100 years of conspiracy theories is antisemitism.

    Also, any racists who haven't singled out the Jews as a hated group just hasn't gotten to them yet.

    How do racists/conspiracy theorists that are actually Jews themselves fit into this (Stephen Miller, for example).

  • zagdrobzagdrob Registered User regular
    zagdrob wrote: »
    Hevach wrote: »
    furlion wrote: »
    Damn got hit with the update bug so here is my post to try and fix it. In keeping with the spirit of the thread I remember when conspiracy theories where just harmless bullshit like we didn't land on the moon and 9/11 was an inside job. The radicalization of conspiracy theorist to causing actual harm to people is not something I would have ever predicted.

    The internet has made it easier to see the disgusting layers, but it's not new. The original reasons behind the moon landing theory were wrapped up in holocaust denial and white supremacy, and 9/11 was all a out Jews from the get go.

    Going back farther, the Pearl Harbor theories (from false flag to intentionally allowing it to proceed) were also tightly in with Holocaust denial and the strong pro-Nazi right wing in the US.

    It used to be fun to read about them, but actually digging into them has always gone dark places.

    If you go to a Rolling Stones concert and the lights go down but you haven't heard Satisfaction...the show isn't over.

    Similarly, if a Conspiracy Theory hasn't gotten to 'The Jews', you haven't heard the whole theory.

    You might in some cases get the barely coded 'Globalist' or 'George Soros' wording, but pretty much one of the universal threads in at least the past 100 years of conspiracy theories is antisemitism.

    Also, any racists who haven't singled out the Jews as a hated group just hasn't gotten to them yet.

    How do racists/conspiracy theorists that are actually Jews themselves fit into this (Stephen Miller, for example).

    There are always examples of members of a group who are dedicated to oppressing a group they are part of. That isn't limited to Jews.

    You have the Phyllis Schaflys of the world, the occasional black (or former slave) overseer, the Kapos, etc repeated through history.

    They might be doing it for power or special privileges. Using power and privilege to turn victim against victim is timeless...not to mention Sinclair's difficult to understand something when salary depends on not understanding it quote.

    They might have just bought fully into the ideology and consider themselves one of 'the good ones' in their own head or consider that aspect of their identity secondary to being part of the oppressors. It often doesn't occur to them that while they may feel this way, the oppressors don't and eventually they are going to be against the wall too.

    Sometimes it's self-loathing. Or just sick fuckers who want to hurt people and don't care if it's people like them or not.

    I'd guess there is a lack of thoughtful introspection too, where people see what they want and dismiss what they don't.

    ElvenshaePhoenix-DCentipede DamascusfurlionNobeardLovelyDisruptedCapitalistMagell
  • TastyfishTastyfish Registered User regular
    Conspiracy theories just don't go in a straight line, they're branching, sprawling things that turn back onto themselves and mixing with others time and time again.
    The only 'final layer' is the one before you decide to stop looking.

    These things evolve and spread, picking up new traits when they encounter them in a host. The best spreaders of conspiracies are particularly vulnerable to this type of thinking, and often transmit multiple strains allowing such wierd hybrids as the fake Corona 5G bioweapon conspiracies. It then stands to reason that the traits that let them spread the fastest and to the most new hosts are the most widely spread and commonly encountered, with "anti-semitism" being a prime example.

    Regardless of how a conspiracy theory starts, eventually it's likely to encounter the white nationalist networks and then have antisemitism incorperated into it whilst greatly accelerating its spread across various hosts, leading to most new infections then being from this strain that has an antisemitic element. Someone encountering this new conspiracy for the first time might not have even considered 'the jews' as a group involved, and might not even recognise the coded version (or recognise it as coded as something else - hence why the Royal Families get wrapped up in these things fairly often in Europe, alongside shadowy billionaires) but as they encounter more and more versions of the first theory, or become receptive to another theory that had become linked, they are more likely to start connecting the common threads from all of them and become more receptive to purely antisemetic ones as well.

    But thinking that there's some ultimate point or principle behind these things is the wrong way to go about it - the conspiracy is just trying to spread, not actually accomplish anything.
    Antisemitism is a vector as much as a goal, and that's why its in everything.

    Gnome-InterruptusGvzbgulCentipede DamascusSmrtnik
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    furlion wrote: »
    furlion wrote: »
    Preacher wrote: »
    furlion wrote: »
    I guess no one I knew who believed in those were advocating armed revolt and the wholesale slaughter of an entire political party.

    Not everyone who believes in dumb conspiracies is a revolutionary. But at its heart the 9/11 was an inside job is not harmless and seeks to invalidate a lot of peoples suffering so the conspiracy person can feel better about the world.

    I mean hell "we faked the moon landing" also kind of invalidates the deaths and hard work of a lot of people. There's a reason you bring that shit to Buzz Aldrin he punches you out.

    Yeah but I don't recall anyone walking into a pizza store and murdering people over it. Maybe it did happen and I just don't know about it, I don't really have any interest in digging into it honestly.

    Uhh, about that.

    He didn't murder anyone, but he damn well tried.

    The quote structure and rhetoric sort of obscure what was meant by that.

    I believe he meant that people never got violent and tried to shoot up a place prior to things like Qanon

    But they just weren’t as easily linked, things like Clock/Bell Tower snipers were something of a dark humour jokes about mental illness and conspiracy theorists and then there were the more publicized incidents like the Kazinsky letter bombs / Unibomber, all of which significantly predates the internet.

    Yeah that's what I meant. I never heard about that happening up until recently. The few times people did commit horrible acts, they were labelled mentally ill. Like the Unibomber. Personally don't really have a problem labelling people who are deep enough into conspiracy theories as having a mental illness, since the definition includes something that is having a significant and noticable negative impact on your life.

    Wasn't Ted Kazinsky actually fucked with by the CIA as part of their garbage psychologoical experiments in the 50s/60s?

    Whippy wrote: »
    nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
    GrpAhic DeiGn is My PAssIon
    Smurphfurlion
  • zagdrobzagdrob Registered User regular
    Doodmann wrote: »
    furlion wrote: »
    furlion wrote: »
    Preacher wrote: »
    furlion wrote: »
    I guess no one I knew who believed in those were advocating armed revolt and the wholesale slaughter of an entire political party.

    Not everyone who believes in dumb conspiracies is a revolutionary. But at its heart the 9/11 was an inside job is not harmless and seeks to invalidate a lot of peoples suffering so the conspiracy person can feel better about the world.

    I mean hell "we faked the moon landing" also kind of invalidates the deaths and hard work of a lot of people. There's a reason you bring that shit to Buzz Aldrin he punches you out.

    Yeah but I don't recall anyone walking into a pizza store and murdering people over it. Maybe it did happen and I just don't know about it, I don't really have any interest in digging into it honestly.

    Uhh, about that.

    He didn't murder anyone, but he damn well tried.

    The quote structure and rhetoric sort of obscure what was meant by that.

    I believe he meant that people never got violent and tried to shoot up a place prior to things like Qanon

    But they just weren’t as easily linked, things like Clock/Bell Tower snipers were something of a dark humour jokes about mental illness and conspiracy theorists and then there were the more publicized incidents like the Kazinsky letter bombs / Unibomber, all of which significantly predates the internet.

    Yeah that's what I meant. I never heard about that happening up until recently. The few times people did commit horrible acts, they were labelled mentally ill. Like the Unibomber. Personally don't really have a problem labelling people who are deep enough into conspiracy theories as having a mental illness, since the definition includes something that is having a significant and noticable negative impact on your life.

    Wasn't Ted Kazinsky actually fucked with by the CIA as part of their garbage psychologoical experiments in the 50s/60s?

    He was part of a psych study that humiliated and demeaned people while monitoring their vitals that may or may not have been connected to the MK-ULTRA programs. Something like 200 hours of psychological trauma / torture.

    My favorite Kaczynski trivia is that someone published a paper that cited one of his papers (he was a brilliant mathematician before, you know, the Unabomber thing) with the note "better known for other works".

    DoodmannJoolanderAuralynxGnome-InterruptustynicpainfulPleasanceForarfurlionm!ttensGiantGeek2020NobeardArmorocHexmage-PAKayne Red RobeKaboodles_The_AssassinMagellSleep
  • HevachHevach Registered User regular
    edited July 2020
    zagdrob wrote: »
    Hevach wrote: »
    furlion wrote: »
    Damn got hit with the update bug so here is my post to try and fix it. In keeping with the spirit of the thread I remember when conspiracy theories where just harmless bullshit like we didn't land on the moon and 9/11 was an inside job. The radicalization of conspiracy theorist to causing actual harm to people is not something I would have ever predicted.

    The internet has made it easier to see the disgusting layers, but it's not new. The original reasons behind the moon landing theory were wrapped up in holocaust denial and white supremacy, and 9/11 was all a out Jews from the get go.

    Going back farther, the Pearl Harbor theories (from false flag to intentionally allowing it to proceed) were also tightly in with Holocaust denial and the strong pro-Nazi right wing in the US.

    It used to be fun to read about them, but actually digging into them has always gone dark places.

    If you go to a Rolling Stones concert and the lights go down but you haven't heard Satisfaction...the show isn't over.

    Similarly, if a Conspiracy Theory hasn't gotten to 'The Jews', you haven't heard the whole theory.

    You might in some cases get the barely coded 'Globalist' or 'George Soros' wording, but pretty much one of the universal threads in at least the past 100 years of conspiracy theories is antisemitism.

    Also, any racists who haven't singled out the Jews as a hated group just hasn't gotten to them yet.

    How do racists/conspiracy theorists that are actually Jews themselves fit into this (Stephen Miller, for example).

    Some are genuinely clueless, others (especially big names) are of the opinion something like "Jews run everything but it's the wrong Jews (i.e. not me or anyone I vote for)."

    Probably the biggest, though, is that a lot of people on the alt-right and the larger conspiracy sphere have blurred their identities into the beleif - it's not really white supremacy anymore, it's "us supremacy." "Us"="White" and "Them"="Black and Jewish," is just blurry enough to exclude a whole lot of "Uses" and allow a handful of the good "Thems" in.

    Hevach on
    SmurphzagdrobMayabird
  • I ZimbraI Zimbra Worst song, played on ugliest guitar Registered User regular
    Twitter is taking action on Qanon





    NBC News reporter on the conspiracy beat.

    They had started harassing celebrities, including Chrissy Teigen, so it was only a matter of time until Twitter did something.

    Gnome-InterruptusElvenshaeCentipede DamascusShadowfireTetraNitroCubanefurlionautono-wally, erotibot300CelestialBadgerArmorocSleep
  • augustaugust where you come from is gone Registered User regular
    I wonder if the Wayfair thing was the last straw. A lot of private individuals probably got harassed off of that nonsense.

    Pac Man's character is difficult to explain even to the Japanese -- he is an innocent character. He hasn't been educated to discern between good and evil. He acts more like a small child than a grown-up person. Think of him as a child learning in the course of his daily activities. If someone tells him guns are evil, he would be the type to rush out and eat guns. But he would most probably eat any gun, even the pistols of policemen who need them.
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx I look for scarlet and you look for ultraviolet Registered User regular
    august wrote: »
    I wonder if the Wayfair thing was the last straw. A lot of private individuals probably got harassed off of that nonsense.

    Its always a safe bet to trace actions like this back to money.

    Gnome-InterruptusElvenshaeTetraNitroCubanefurlionDoodmannGiantGeek2020Moridin889MayabirdNobeardmarajiHappy Little MachineKaboodles_The_Assassin
  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    august wrote: »
    I wonder if the Wayfair thing was the last straw. A lot of private individuals probably got harassed off of that nonsense.

    Its always a safe bet to trace actions like this back to money.

    I'll take it, like yeah it only happened because the rich and famous were inconvenienced but banning Q anon shit is good for all of us.

    I'm sure this just reaffirms something Q said once maybe so its totally true Trump is fighting the lizard people today! And not praising an actual child sex traffiker.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
    ElvenshaeI ZimbraA Dabble Of TheloniusShadowfireTetraNitroCubanepainfulPleasanceTHAC0L Ron HowardfurlionNeveronGnome-InterruptusQanamilHappy Little MachineKamarKaboodles_The_AssassinA Kobold's Kobold
  • Phoenix-DPhoenix-D Registered User regular
    edited July 2020
    The comments section on that is predictably darkly hilarious. So much "you can't do this" "you prove q right I am totally an unbiased account" "qanon never harasses anyone"
    Preacher wrote: »
    august wrote: »
    I wonder if the Wayfair thing was the last straw. A lot of private individuals probably got harassed off of that nonsense.

    Its always a safe bet to trace actions like this back to money.

    I'll take it, like yeah it only happened because the rich and famous were inconvenienced but banning Q anon shit is good for all of us.

    I'm sure this just reaffirms something Q said once maybe so its totally true Trump is fighting the lizard people today! And not praising an actual child sex traffiker.

    they already have an excuse for that. I shit you not he was "wishing her well so she survives to testify"

    Phoenix-D on
  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    Preacher wrote: »
    august wrote: »
    I wonder if the Wayfair thing was the last straw. A lot of private individuals probably got harassed off of that nonsense.

    Its always a safe bet to trace actions like this back to money.

    I'll take it, like yeah it only happened because the rich and famous were inconvenienced but banning Q anon shit is good for all of us.

    I'm sure this just reaffirms something Q said once maybe so its totally true Trump is fighting the lizard people today! And not praising an actual child sex traffiker.

    In terms of affirming their faith, correlating a Q prophecy to something that actually happened is probably a close second to explaining why a prophecy appears to be wrong.

    Any scientist will tell you that the truest facts are the ones you can't prove; they're called axioms. Look it up!!

    Gvzbgul
  • GvzbgulGvzbgul Registered User regular
    There's a theory that failed prophecy only serves to deepen the believer's belief. Based on a study of a UFO New Religious Movement in which the founder prophesied that aliens would arrive at a certain date. The date came and went, it was total disproof of their belief. Yet, the followers stayed true and in fact doubled down. Granted, there has not been much actual study done on similar situations outside this particular cult (and people frikken love to take one social study and extrapolate it into a universal law), so it may not play out this way all the time.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/When_Prophecy_Fails

  • ProhassProhass Registered User regular
    edited July 2020
    It makes sense, I mean if all it took to dissuade people of their beliefs, either in prophecy or anything else, was cold reality and the failings of a prophecy to come to pass, most religions wouldn’t survive, let alone cults

    Prohass on
    ArbitraryDescriptorfurlionGnome-InterruptuszagdrobGiantGeek2020NobeardMoridin889KamarMagell
  • Jealous DevaJealous Deva Registered User regular
    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    There's a theory that failed prophecy only serves to deepen the believer's belief. Based on a study of a UFO New Religious Movement in which the founder prophesied that aliens would arrive at a certain date. The date came and went, it was total disproof of their belief. Yet, the followers stayed true and in fact doubled down. Granted, there has not been much actual study done on similar situations outside this particular cult (and people frikken love to take one social study and extrapolate it into a universal law), so it may not play out this way all the time.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/When_Prophecy_Fails

    Didn’t the same thing happen with Jehova’s Witnesses?

  • GilgaronGilgaron Registered User regular
    There may be better texts written in the past decade, but https://www.amazon.com/How-Millennium-Comes-Violently-Jonestown/dp/1889119245 this was one I'd read for a comparative religion course that went into a lot of how these things work psychologically/sociologically. It went into quite a few different examples of millenialism and as I recall even delved into millenialistic cults that sprung up in cultures like the Native Americans in the western plains when they started to experience pressure from westward expansion.

  • BlindPsychicBlindPsychic Registered User regular
    I don't think they were the Jehova's Witnesses as we know them yet but yes
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unfulfilled_Watch_Tower_Society_predictions

    A Dabble Of Thelonius
  • Jealous DevaJealous Deva Registered User regular
    I don't think they were the Jehova's Witnesses as we know them yet but yes
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unfulfilled_Watch_Tower_Society_predictions

    Wow... um, I was really only referring to the 1975 time, I didn’t even know of the other 6 or so times they have failed to predict the apocalypse..

    Well, 8th time is the charm, right?

    David Walgas
  • HevachHevach Registered User regular
    I don't think they were the Jehova's Witnesses as we know them yet but yes
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unfulfilled_Watch_Tower_Society_predictions

    Wow... um, I was really only referring to the 1975 time, I didn’t even know of the other 6 or so times they have failed to predict the apocalypse..

    Well, 8th time is the charm, right?

    They are technically getting closer every time.

    spool32marajiDavid WalgasTamerBill
  • GiantGeek2020GiantGeek2020 Registered User regular
    Hevach wrote: »
    I don't think they were the Jehova's Witnesses as we know them yet but yes
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unfulfilled_Watch_Tower_Society_predictions

    Wow... um, I was really only referring to the 1975 time, I didn’t even know of the other 6 or so times they have failed to predict the apocalypse..

    Well, 8th time is the charm, right?

    They are technically getting closer every time.

    Especially since Trump has been elected.

    3. A surprisingly small number of adults have attempted the largely successful, “Punch the small children to escape” tactic.
  • HevachHevach Registered User regular
    edited July 2020
    The threads are converging again.
    Couscous wrote: »
    https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/22/politics/john-gibbs-opm-kfile/index.html
    Trump's pick to head Office of Personnel Management spread 'satanic' conspiracy theory, called Democrats party of 'Islam' and 'gender-bending'
    On Twitter, Gibbs made multiple references to a conspiracy theory started by far-right bloggers that claimed Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign chairman, John Podesta took part in a satanic ritual. The claim has repeatedly been debunked.

    Tweets from Gibbs, archived on the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine, show him promoting the conspiracy four times between October 31 and November 5 of 2016, using the hashtag #SpiritCooking.


    The hashtag originated from an email of Podesta's released by WikiLeaks, which members of the far right claimed without evidence meant that Podesta was involved in some sort of satanic ritual.

    When radio host Wayne Dupree, who has spread Sandy Hook school shooting hoax stories, tweeted that Clinton was losing Black support because her campaign manager took part in "Satanic #SpiritCooking," Gibbs quote tweeted him, writing, "True, true, and true. #Trump #SpiritCooking #BlackLivesMatter."

    In tweets from early 2016, Gibbs also blasted "cucks," a derogatory term used by the far right to insult establishment conservatives, and derided the Democratic Party for accepting Islam.

    In a tweet from October 2016, Gibbs defended Ricky Vaughn, an alt-right figure who often tweeted anti-Semitic sentiments and was banned by Twitter.
    "#Twitter down big today because they banned Ricky? #FreeRicky," he wrote.

    In a February 2016 tweet, Gibbs said the Democratic Party had become the party of "Islam, gender-bending, anti-police, 'u racist!' "
    That a Trump pick has a history of saying batshit things is no longer surprising, and at some point they have to not even be bothering to pretend to care about it.

    Is the spirit cooking nonsense considered part of the Q conspiracy theory or is it just a precursor to it?

    Coming over from the administration turnover thread.

    Spirit Cooking refers to a mid 90's performance artwork by Marina Abramovic. It was... Particularly fucked up and involved a bunch of bizarre and nonsensical "recipes" involving ingredients like breast milk, menstrual blood, pain, and a single cut ruby.

    It was all vaguely occultish, but much more aimed at shock value, something Abramovic is (in)famous for - spirit cooking pales next to her Rhythm series (Rhythm 0 is a horrific fever nightmare, look it up) and some of the performance pieces she was never able to get a venue for - her literal coup de grace was to be an untitled performance in which she had a 1 in 6 chance of dying on stage:
    "From the right pocket of my skirt I take a gun. From the left pocket of my skirt I take a bullet. I put the bullet into the chamber and turn it. I place the gun to my temple. I pull the trigger." The performance had two possible outcomes.

    Of course Spirit Cooking's existence quickly became a subject of the Satanic Panic, and the appearance of Abramovic in the Podesta Emails inducted it into Q.

    Hevach on
    Eddy
  • Ninja Snarl PNinja Snarl P My helmet is my burden. Ninja Snarl: Gone, but not forgotten.Registered User regular
    Prohass wrote: »
    It makes sense, I mean if all it took to dissuade people of their beliefs, either in prophecy or anything else, was cold reality and the failings of a prophecy to come to pass, most religions wouldn’t survive, let alone cults

    On top of that, a "failed" prophecy to "true believers" means they clearly just didn't believe hard enough and thus have to double-down on believing in order to get the really serious for-real truth right. On top of that, you've got the people who just can't accept the idea they've wasted their time, so they've also got to double down on believing so they can also get the truth that proves they've not been total suckers.

    ProhassGvzbgulElvenshaeL Ron HowardGnome-InterruptusHexmage-PA
  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    Hevach wrote: »
    The threads are converging again.

    I am not loving that 2020 is rehashing the arc where every thread devolves into a Trump thread, except Qanon.

  • HevachHevach Registered User regular
    edited July 2020
    I try my best, but around the time Bigfoot became part of the Qanon thing it was futile. If the poor sasquatch can't escape there's no hope for a forgotten mid 90's performance art piece.

    Hevach on
    ArbitraryDescriptorElvenshaeGiantGeek2020L Ron HowardmarajiEddy
  • MayabirdMayabird Pecking at the keyboardRegistered User regular
    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    There's a theory that failed prophecy only serves to deepen the believer's belief. Based on a study of a UFO New Religious Movement in which the founder prophesied that aliens would arrive at a certain date. The date came and went, it was total disproof of their belief. Yet, the followers stayed true and in fact doubled down. Granted, there has not been much actual study done on similar situations outside this particular cult (and people frikken love to take one social study and extrapolate it into a universal law), so it may not play out this way all the time.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/When_Prophecy_Fails

    Didn’t the same thing happen with Jehova’s Witnesses?

    Seventh Day Adventists are based on two consecutive failed prophesies of the Second Coming. The event has literally gone down in history as The Great Disappointment and a church formed around it.

    ProhassGvzbgulLovelyHexmage-PA
  • MayabirdMayabird Pecking at the keyboardRegistered User regular
    Joolander wrote: »
    Mayabird wrote: »
    Of course it's all connected.

    Because it's all the fault of DA JOOOOOOOOOOOOOOS!!!!!1!1!!!!

    Sup

    I regret I have but one awesome to give this response.




    Also I have a hypothesis about why every single conspiracy theory inevitably winds up at Antisemitism - because it's always at the base. Learning from an early age to hate Jews (and racism always starts early) primes people to believe in conspiracy theories later. Maybe it's because of blood libel or just some sort of "they killed Jesus" blame or whatever (and I'm not sure why other types of racism wouldn't necessarily spark this), but whatever it is, it just fundamentally breaks people's brains. Layers of flat earth Sasquatch lizardmen running sex slave tunnels via autism vaccine microchipping always end up at DA JOOOOOS because ultimately, that's what's at the bottom, what was always at the bottom, and what is always at the bottom.

    Elvenshae
  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    Hevach wrote: »
    I try my best, but around the time Bigfoot became part of the Qanon thing it was futile. If the poor sasquatch can't escape there's no hope for a forgotten mid 90's performance art piece.

    "When we were aging crackpots there was an knack to it, it was a real craft. Did we fake the moon landing, or did we send Armstrong up there to give the martians what-for? It's not both! That's just assinine.

    These kids today with their hamfisted, crowd sourced meta theories don't know the first thing about hard work, or psuedo-scientific riguer. 'Whoa, what if, like, everything is the same thing, and we're all right?'

    Gimme a break, you god damned hippies."

    - A 120 year old ghost complaining about their Boomer grandkids today, probably.

    ElvenshaepainfulPleasanceL Ron HowardtynicJoolanderEddyHexmage-PA
  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular

    Just the President's son posting a joke based on a conspiracy theory. This is fine.jpg

  • ProhassProhass Registered User regular
    Man they reeeallly wish they were still running against Hillary

    Elvenshaedestroyah87GiantGeek2020L Ron HowardGnome-InterruptusDiannaoChongDoodmannCentipede Damascusdurandal4532tynicMunkus BeaverfurlionpainfulPleasancezagdrobPolaritieshrykeDisruptedCapitalistmarajiIncenjucarSealNobeardHappy Little MachineKamarPreacherMidnite38thDoejungleroomxFoolOnTheHillMagellSleepA Kobold's Kobold
  • MortiousMortious The Nightmare Begins Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    Honestly if they had phoned up Clinton at the start of this thing to take care of it, you guys would have been in much better shape.

    Move to New Zealand
    It’s not a very important country most of the time
    http://steamcommunity.com/id/mortious
    Gnome-InterruptusshrykeJoolanderCelestialBadgermarajiKamarFoolOnTheHill
  • HevachHevach Registered User regular
    I mean, it's not like Obama condensed the plan into a pocket sized playbook and handed it to Trump or anything.

    ElvenshaefurlionOrcaspool32Gnome-InterruptusSmrtnikMoridin889JoolandermarajiIncenjucarNobeardKruiteKamarA Kobold's Kobold
  • Ninja Snarl PNinja Snarl P My helmet is my burden. Ninja Snarl: Gone, but not forgotten.Registered User regular
    Hevach wrote: »
    I mean, it's not like Obama condensed the plan into a pocket sized playbook and handed it to Trump or anything.

    Well there's the problem, that thing would've been one of those giant-sized geography books for Trump and he can't be bothered to read big books that don't have big pictures.

    Elvenshaefurlion
  • ZavianZavian universal peace sounds better than forever war Registered User regular
    So the NYT is saying:
    Eric W. Davis, an astrophysicist who worked as a subcontractor and then a consultant for the Pentagon U.F.O. program since 2007, said that, in some cases, examination of the materials had so far failed to determine their source and led him to conclude, “We couldn’t make it ourselves.”

    The constraints on discussing classified programs — and the ambiguity of information cited in unclassified slides from the briefings — have put officials who have studied U.F.O.s in the position of stating their views without presenting any hard evidence.

    Mr. Davis, who now works for Aerospace Corporation, a defense contractor, said he gave a classified briefing to a Defense Department agency as recently as March about retrievals from “off-world vehicles not made on this earth.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/23/us/politics/pentagon-ufo-harry-reid-navy.html

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  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    "we couldn't make it ourselves" doesn't mean aliens or even anything made by intelligent beings

  • ZavianZavian universal peace sounds better than forever war Registered User regular
    edited July 2020
    Couscous wrote: »
    "we couldn't make it ourselves" doesn't mean aliens or even anything made by intelligent beings
    The article means “not-man made” by “ourselves”. They specifically say “vehicles” not rocks or natural phenomena

    Zavian on
  • HevachHevach Registered User regular
    Eric W Davis is a crackpot who claims to have achieved macro teleportation but lost the designs to the system when he changed jobs and routinely calls random things found in puddles or on rocks panspermia.

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  • ZavianZavian universal peace sounds better than forever war Registered User regular
    edited July 2020
    Hevach wrote: »
    Eric W Davis is a crackpot who claims to have achieved macro teleportation but lost the designs to the system when he changed jobs and routinely calls random things found in puddles or on rocks panspermia.

    I live in florida and can confirm there's a lot of random panspermia going on around rocks and in puddles. if you used a UV light it would look like a murder scene

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  • HevachHevach Registered User regular
    Based on what I read of Florida in the Bad News thread, I think that's mostly just regular spermia.

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  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    Hevach wrote: »
    Based on what I read of Florida in the Bad News thread, I think that's mostly just regular spermia.

    Depends on which part of Florida. Some of it is at least panhandlespermia.

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  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    edited July 2020
    Hevach wrote: »
    Eric W Davis is a crackpot who claims to have achieved macro teleportation but lost the designs to the system when he changed jobs and routinely calls random things found in puddles or on rocks panspermia.

    This is a man who has briefed government officials on stargates:


    (Washington Post journalist)

    So I absolutely believe his claim that he briefed them on retrieval of alien craft, but that doesn't mean we've ever recovered one.

    That said, I love the idea of the Senate Intel committee directing DOD to come up with a common procedure for this possibility (in the linked committee report). I just picture some Army Officer, who wasn't listed on the attendees slide, seated at the back of the room, taking copious notes, and leaving without saying a word.

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