Kids/Parenting: It’s fine, everything is fine.

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  • CalicaCalica Registered User regular
    Hate the diagnosis, or...?

    Jedoc wrote: »
    The GOP cares about babies until they're born, soldiers until they're in need of care, and families until they interfere with stockholder dividends.
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    quovadis13 wrote: »
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    My daughter will not sleep. I'm sure the chaos of the last few weeks isn't helping, of course, but we're getting stressed. She's up by 530 every morning, won't nap, and gets to be a complete asshole by 4-5 in the afternoon.

    How old is she and how long has it been going on for? If there is no underlying issue, I would guess it’s just a phase and things will probably return to normal sooner or later.

    She's almost 5. We've been dealing with behavioral issues for a while with her and it's been steadily getting worse. She's been diagnosed with ADHD which I really didn't want at this age but everyone from the doctors to get school liaisons have said it's clear. I hate it.

    I feel ya. With school out and no ability to go see other people beyond the immediate family, my daughter is completely cut-off from all her support systems. They had her in a special program in school and everything and it was really helping. And now we're like a few weeks away from going insane.

  • AimAim Registered User regular
    My kids are planning on making a trap to catch the easter bunny.

    DisruptedCapitalistBrodyNobeardhonovereKayne Red Robe
  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    My daughter is having trouble getting to sleep too. She's 6 and also has ADHD. I think it's lack of exercise because she doesn't seem anxious or anything.

  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Calica wrote: »
    Hate the diagnosis, or...?

    Yes? It's a hard thing for me to come to grips with, and that's entirely on me. I'm worried about the stigma of ADHD and being on medication. But I also shouldn't be because I'm on medication for depression so is this really that different?

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    Calica wrote: »
    Hate the diagnosis, or...?

    Yes? It's a hard thing for me to come to grips with, and that's entirely on me. I'm worried about the stigma of ADHD and being on medication. But I also shouldn't be because I'm on medication for depression so is this really that different?

    Eh, I don't think there's the stigma there used to be. Also, kids these days seem to be way nicer.

    Capt Howdy
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    schuss wrote: »
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    Calica wrote: »
    Hate the diagnosis, or...?

    Yes? It's a hard thing for me to come to grips with, and that's entirely on me. I'm worried about the stigma of ADHD and being on medication. But I also shouldn't be because I'm on medication for depression so is this really that different?

    Eh, I don't think there's the stigma there used to be. Also, kids these days seem to be way nicer.

    Not worried about the kids, I'm worried about the adults. We won't tell either of our parents that we're medicating her to try and help her because they're all nuts about medicine for mental needs. Which is crazy since my wife's moms are both nurses.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    ElvenshaelonelyahavaDisruptedCapitalistJanson
  • SleepSleep Registered User regular
    edited April 2020
    So as someone that's been ADHD since the age you're describing I gotta express my condolences, that sleep thing never really changes. Especially if you're rocking an amphetamine habit and the dose is off. Shit I still have sleep problems and I stopped taking amphetamines like a decade ago. It's just a thing with ADHD, we regularly suck at sleeping. We often just don't go to bed well, and we get tired in the day because of it. Like actively right now I should totally be in bed, but I got this post I'm writing, and I found another public access music video show, and maybe I'll just look at some D&D stuff for a little bit (I will not I need to go to sleep). Like if I take a minute to be present and honestly appraise myself... I'm tired as shit, it's past 2:30 in the morning, there's physical signs of tiredness I can recognize, but I keep getting distracted from that fact, cause well... that's what I do.

    The biggest pieces of advice for childhood and adult ADHD sleep issues are: regular exercise, a solid relaxing bedtime ritual, a consistent bed time that ritual takes place at.

    Sleep on
    CalicaBlackDragon480NobeardJanson
  • CalicaCalica Registered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    schuss wrote: »
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    Calica wrote: »
    Hate the diagnosis, or...?

    Yes? It's a hard thing for me to come to grips with, and that's entirely on me. I'm worried about the stigma of ADHD and being on medication. But I also shouldn't be because I'm on medication for depression so is this really that different?

    Eh, I don't think there's the stigma there used to be. Also, kids these days seem to be way nicer.

    Not worried about the kids, I'm worried about the adults. We won't tell either of our parents that we're medicating her to try and help her because they're all nuts about medicine for mental needs. Which is crazy since my wife's moms are both nurses.

    That's understandable. There are still way too many dumbasses who refuse to believe that ADHD is a real thing and not just an excuse to be lazy/a lazy parent. And some of them are doctors!

    Jedoc wrote: »
    The GOP cares about babies until they're born, soldiers until they're in need of care, and families until they interfere with stockholder dividends.
    JaysonFourBrodyJanson
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    schuss wrote: »
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    Calica wrote: »
    Hate the diagnosis, or...?

    Yes? It's a hard thing for me to come to grips with, and that's entirely on me. I'm worried about the stigma of ADHD and being on medication. But I also shouldn't be because I'm on medication for depression so is this really that different?

    Eh, I don't think there's the stigma there used to be. Also, kids these days seem to be way nicer.

    Not worried about the kids, I'm worried about the adults. We won't tell either of our parents that we're medicating her to try and help her because they're all nuts about medicine for mental needs. Which is crazy since my wife's moms are both nurses.

    Eh, screw them. If there's one thing I've picked up parenting it's that every kid is different and may require different techniques.
    I have some opinions, for sure, but have learned to keep my gob shut as what I don't know about parenting vastly outstrips what I do.
    I do the things that feel right for my kids as hopefully others do. I'm sure others judge me and my style, that's fine, all we can do is try our best and get expert help when needed.

    lonelyahavaJaysonFourAimwobblyheadedbob
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Sleep wrote: »
    So as someone that's been ADHD since the age you're describing I gotta express my condolences, that sleep thing never really changes. Especially if you're rocking an amphetamine habit and the dose is off. Shit I still have sleep problems and I stopped taking amphetamines like a decade ago. It's just a thing with ADHD, we regularly suck at sleeping. We often just don't go to bed well, and we get tired in the day because of it. Like actively right now I should totally be in bed, but I got this post I'm writing, and I found another public access music video show, and maybe I'll just look at some D&D stuff for a little bit (I will not I need to go to sleep). Like if I take a minute to be present and honestly appraise myself... I'm tired as shit, it's past 2:30 in the morning, there's physical signs of tiredness I can recognize, but I keep getting distracted from that fact, cause well... that's what I do.

    The biggest pieces of advice for childhood and adult ADHD sleep issues are: regular exercise, a solid relaxing bedtime ritual, a consistent bed time that ritual takes place at.

    Honestly these are things we do. In bed by 730 after we chill, bathe, and read 2-3 books. She gets to sleep fine at night, but gets up super early.

    Except last night! Yesterday was her first dose of the medication. Last night she got to sleep at normal time, got up to poop at midnight, and didn't go back to sleep. Or nap today. Likely just a coincidence but we'll see tonight!

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    I'm thinking of giving my daughter ADHD medicine but if it's going to make her sleep worse than it already is it might not work out. She's going to bed at midnight at the moment.

  • RickRudeRickRude Registered User regular
    Baby is 5 months old, halfway to 6. Honestly we've been co sleeping for a really long time, and always picking her up while she's fussing.

    Not sure if it's right or wrong but trying to introduce her to the pack and play. Get used to being on their own for a little bit, maybe sleep in it.

    Honestly, what is the medical thought on self soothing right now? Am I being a dick watching her cry when I'm just trying to get stuff done and she has plenty of toys.

    I'm trying to do everything right, and I assume the Pac and play and leaving them to cry at sometimes is ok. My parents did it to me as did my gf's. They'd throw us in there , let us cry our self to sleep, and get stuff done around the house.

  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    At that point cry is the only button they have to push (okay, flail is in there too). This is something DIFFERENT so they're crying. If possible, be out of the room so they can process on their own, but our rule was as long as it wasn't "help" crying and just "regular" crying we'd leave them.
    That said - every kid is different and our daughter hated it a lot more.

    ElvenshaeMegaMan001
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    RickRude wrote: »
    Baby is 5 months old, halfway to 6. Honestly we've been co sleeping for a really long time, and always picking her up while she's fussing.

    Not sure if it's right or wrong but trying to introduce her to the pack and play. Get used to being on their own for a little bit, maybe sleep in it.

    Honestly, what is the medical thought on self soothing right now? Am I being a dick watching her cry when I'm just trying to get stuff done and she has plenty of toys.

    I'm trying to do everything right, and I assume the Pac and play and leaving them to cry at sometimes is ok. My parents did it to me as did my gf's. They'd throw us in there , let us cry our self to sleep, and get stuff done around the house.

    I think the understanding is that cry it out is something for post six months, but it's been a while since I read anything on it. I used to take Sapling to bed, lay down next to her, and then when she fell asleep move her to her pack and play in the same room. Unfortunately this resulted in me being so tired from laying in a dark room that it made my bed time 8 as well.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
  • Capt HowdyCapt Howdy Registered User regular
    I'm thinking of giving my daughter ADHD medicine but if it's going to make her sleep worse than it already is it might not work out. She's going to bed at midnight at the moment.

    Melatonin really helps.

    I was diagnosed ADHD back in the 80's and took Ritalin until the summer before 9the grade. Been off ever since. My oldest was diagnosed in second grade and he stopped taking meds in 8the grade. Neither of us usually sleep until midnight, sometimes later. Both wake up at 0530, ready and roaring to go.

    We both take 10mg of melatonin when we really cant sleep. I even give my 5 year old 1mg of melatonin. Kiddo is usually out within an hour after taking it. Without it he'd be up until midnight with his brother and I.

    People who are not morning people hate us. Our feet hit the floor running after 5 hrs of sleep.

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  • So It GoesSo It Goes We keep moving...Registered User regular
    We did cry it out at 4 months - in her crib when previously we had been rocking to sleep then carefully transferring to crib. Our kid is a good sleeper now at 2 and a half. These two things may or may not be correlated.



    shryke
  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    I think you can start sleep training around 3-6 months. I've also read/heard/seen that you definitely want to start and hopefully finish before 8 months, because it gets worse after that. Before 8 months they forget you exist a lot easier. After 8 months they remember that you were there a second ago and they get really agitated if you're not there now. Not impossible mind you. You can sleep train at almost any age. But supposedly it gets harder when they are older.

    We had no luck with the cry it out method. In that, no matter how long we waited she would never stop crying. And if we waited more than 10-20 minutes she would be so worked up that even when we tried to sooth her and rock her to sleep she didn't sleep well.

    I mean I guess I should say we never waited like an hour straight, we would always go in after 10-15 minutes to try and sooth her, and then leave again. So maybe if you just wait a long time, with absolutely no interaction, they will eventually give up. But going in every 15 minutes or so meant she would just cry for 1-2 hours at which point she was supposed to be up anyway (we always gave up at night well before that).

    What mostly worked was having a very consistent routine (exact same steps before each nap and before bed), and then always putting her down alone and awake(ish) but like falling asleep. On bad days she would instantly wake up when you transferred her to the crib, and after 5-10 minutes of crying (or if she got really worked up) we would go in and rock her to sleep, then put her down asleep. Over time she had less bad days and more good days.

    I also think that it helped to not talk to her or look at her at all really, during the pre-sleepy time routine (except for book reading). If I do look at her I close my eyes like I am falling asleep. Probably it's just me being superstitious, but I swear, whenever my wife would put her down she would always be starring at her and talking trying to calm her, and the kid would just never close her eyes and would instantly cry when put down. But I would come in and give her the silent treatment and she would be like "I guess nothing exciting is happening so I'll just close my eyes for a bit."

    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
  • So It GoesSo It Goes We keep moving...Registered User regular
    All of what you said about consistent routine, putting down not fully asleep, and not talking and maintaining a neutral face when putting down was advised by my doc, except I was advised up to an hour of crying is fine when you start (which is what it took first time with my kid) and that 10-20 minutes is not long enough because it will just start things over, as you experienced.

    CauldRickRude
  • GorkGork Registered User regular
    My daughter is on her second night in the crib after sleeping in our room in a Snoo for five and a half months. She is doing pretty great but I hate it. I’m a way lighter sleeper then my wife, so I’ve usually been the one who wakes up first when she makes any noise and I cannot stop stressing the fuck out about her being just across the hall. Argggggg.

    BrodyElvenshae
  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    So It Goes wrote: »
    All of what you said about consistent routine, putting down not fully asleep, and not talking and maintaining a neutral face when putting down was advised by my doc, except I was advised up to an hour of crying is fine when you start (which is what it took first time with my kid) and that 10-20 minutes is not long enough because it will just start things over, as you experienced.

    Well there you go. I guess I should have read up a bit more.

    I will say this. I feel for anyone having problems. We had a week straight at one point where she would barely sleep during the day (maybe 30-45 minutes each nap after like an hour of trying to get her down), and would wake up 2-3 times at night, each requiring like an hour to get her back to sleep. By the end I was barely hanging on to sanity, and it was only a week! I was so stressed out all day and not really sleeping. It's like that quote from office space "Every single day of my life has been worse than the day before it. So that means that every single day that you see me, that's on the worst day of my life." Sleep problems are the worst.

    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
    Elvenshae
  • RickRudeRickRude Registered User regular
    So It Goes wrote: »
    All of what you said about consistent routine, putting down not fully asleep, and not talking and maintaining a neutral face when putting down was advised by my doc, except I was advised up to an hour of crying is fine when you start (which is what it took first time with my kid) and that 10-20 minutes is not long enough because it will just start things over, as you experienced.

    God this post makes me feel so much better. We're trying and my baby is crying her eyes out right now. Sadly I took her out thinking she needed to be changed. But I'm just dying right now listening to her. Hearing that a doctor said up to an hour is fine and that if you do something too early reassures me.

  • So It GoesSo It Goes We keep moving...Registered User regular
    RickRude wrote: »
    So It Goes wrote: »
    All of what you said about consistent routine, putting down not fully asleep, and not talking and maintaining a neutral face when putting down was advised by my doc, except I was advised up to an hour of crying is fine when you start (which is what it took first time with my kid) and that 10-20 minutes is not long enough because it will just start things over, as you experienced.

    God this post makes me feel so much better. We're trying and my baby is crying her eyes out right now. Sadly I took her out thinking she needed to be changed. But I'm just dying right now listening to her. Hearing that a doctor said up to an hour is fine and that if you do something too early reassures me.

    Of course every kid is different and you should consult your doctor with any questions you have. It's okay to put on headphones or leave the house for a walk if your partner can stay behind in the house. I vacuumed.

  • RickRudeRickRude Registered User regular
    So It Goes wrote: »
    RickRude wrote: »
    So It Goes wrote: »
    All of what you said about consistent routine, putting down not fully asleep, and not talking and maintaining a neutral face when putting down was advised by my doc, except I was advised up to an hour of crying is fine when you start (which is what it took first time with my kid) and that 10-20 minutes is not long enough because it will just start things over, as you experienced.

    God this post makes me feel so much better. We're trying and my baby is crying her eyes out right now. Sadly I took her out thinking she needed to be changed. But I'm just dying right now listening to her. Hearing that a doctor said up to an hour is fine and that if you do something too early reassures me.

    Of course every kid is different and you should consult your doctor with any questions you have. It's okay to put on headphones or leave the house for a walk if your partner can stay behind in the house. I vacuumed.

    I know it's totally different but i had to do this while crate training my dog. If drive to the gas station, get a candy bar, and eat it outside because the crying got to me.

  • So It GoesSo It Goes We keep moving...Registered User regular
    U got this. Chocolate is a great idea. :bro:

    Jebus314ShadowfireHappylilElfElvenshaeMichaelLC
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    We did the graduating cry it out method, where the first night you go back in (and gently, vocally console them for a moment, don't pick them up) at 2 minutes of crying, 3 minutes of crying, 5, 5, 5, 10

    And then the next night we did 2, 3, 5, 10, 15

    And then 3, 5, 10, 15, 15

    Etc.

    No matter how you go about it, there are very few absolutely wrong ways, and if you are this worried, you are probably doing fine. Also, no matter how you do it, hearing them cry will destroy you.

    Also, Sapling was closer to 14 months by the time we got to sleep training because we wanted to wait until after she recovered from her surgery.
    Gork wrote: »
    My daughter is on her second night in the crib after sleeping in our room in a Snoo for five and a half months. She is doing pretty great but I hate it. I’m a way lighter sleeper then my wife, so I’ve usually been the one who wakes up first when she makes any noise and I cannot stop stressing the fuck out about her being just across the hall. Argggggg.

    Oh my god this part is so hard. We didn't have a monitor or anything, and I was constantly trying to stop myself from going back to check on her.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
  • knight11eknight11e Registered User regular
    Gork wrote: »
    My daughter is on her second night in the crib after sleeping in our room in a Snoo for five and a half months. She is doing pretty great but I hate it. I’m a way lighter sleeper then my wife, so I’ve usually been the one who wakes up first when she makes any noise and I cannot stop stressing the fuck out about her being just across the hall. Argggggg.

    I was in the exact same boat for my now 4 year old. If it makes you feel any better, it gets easier. Also, I wasn’t nearly as stressed for my now 1 year old.

    Elvenshae
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    We put our daughter in her own crib from day one, but got stuck in a routine of waiting for her to fall asleep before we left at night.
    There were night that I fell asleep on the floor and many that I was crawling out on hands and knees so she didn't notice I left.

    Now at 8 she's pretty much doing everything herself, we just read or own books for a bit then tuck her in.

    So almost always gets better, but it sure doesn't feel like it in the middle.

    Echo wrote: »
    Something working on the first try is a source of great suspicion.
    kime
  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava ~~She/Her~~ Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    Cross posting from the Introverts thread, and the SE Kids thread
    Kia Ora, Whanau!

    I know we have some rugby fans, or even just people that are fans of the All Blacks, or are fascinated by other indigenous cultures. Or have seen Moana far too many times to really count.

    Are you stuck at home with children who have far too much energy and no good outlet? Do you want them to learn something different, perhaps start to pick up another language? Or get them doing something other than singing "You're Welcome"?

    Please allow me to introduce you to Matua Whaitiri, an instructor for Kapa Haka from around the Porirua area in New Zealand. Matua Whaitiri (or Maori Thor as he introduces himself as) was very sad that he could not teach his students during this time of rahui. So, he took his Kapa haka lessons online.

    He streams live from facebook every monday morning, and the videos are also uploaded onto Youtube.

    I present to you here the first pilot episode for his show, there are now 11 episodes up on his youtube, please enjoy!

    DisruptedCapitalistHappylilElfElvenshae
  • RickRudeRickRude Registered User regular
    As a father of a 5 month-old in this crazy world, really sad we have no first Easter pictures. No eater bunny to go see, and it just kind of slipped by.

    ElvenshaeCauld
  • MegaMan001MegaMan001 CRNA Rochester, MNRegistered User regular
    There's absolutely no consensus on sleep training.

    What's important is whatever you decide to do you stick with it so the kid at least has an idea of what to expect.

    I am in the business of saving lives.
    Mojo_JojokimeBlackDragon480Brodyschuss
  • SummaryJudgmentSummaryJudgment Today we will paint a mountain that owes us nothing. Registered User regular
    edited April 2020
    Hey, recommendations for a tablet for a toddler?

    I've heard the Fire 7 for Kids is a great pick, but you can't get YouTube on it? Kiddo loves certain YouTube content (i.e. Pinkfong) so we don't want to lose access to that.

    The laptop we're using right now she's outgrowing, and she just pounds on the keyboard now and minimizes her video and gets frustrated

    edit: went ahead with a fire 8 kids edition

    SummaryJudgment on
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  • SummaryJudgmentSummaryJudgment Today we will paint a mountain that owes us nothing. Registered User regular
    I wish I could grab the book but the library is closed - we're getting ready to try the Ferber method tonight with our 20-month old.

    My wife just tried nap training her, from 11:14 to 11:50 she screamed bloody murder but she's asleep now. My wife stayed in there the whole time but wouldn't let her exit her lowered crib and coaxed her back every time.

    Currently between signatures!
  • John MatrixJohn Matrix Registered User regular
    Carpy wrote: »
    Luckily, in 1996 the Consumer Product Safety Commission voted to introduce a loophole in the law: pajamas didn’t need to be made of fire-resistant fabrics if they were tight-fitting! Tight-fitting pajamas are less flammable because fires need oxygen to burn. So if there is no air between the child’s skin and the fabric, the fire gets less oxygen.

    Wot??

    It's good to know that these things are just a scam to get around liability

    So, their reason is wrong, but the outcome is real thanks to thermal conductivity. It's the paper cup full of water over a candle science experiment, the paper doesn't burn but the water will eventually boil, because the water transfers the heat away from the paper fast enough the paper can't reach its ignition temperature. The same reason you're told to not wear loose fitting clothing in labs when using open flames. You'll still get burned of course because of the heat transfer but the clothing won't ignite.

    I spoke with several experts regarding this very subject when I was working on a clothing burns lawsuit a few years ago. The expert I spoke with said the exact same thing about tight fitting clothing being better than loose. Also that cotton is more flammable than most synthetics.

    It's all a bit vague now, but if you look at the label there's some sort of ASTM standard or something particularly for children's bedclothes.

  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    Anyone else getting their kid potty-trained during lockdown? Our son is towards the older end of the spectrum to start it I guess, but he's done super well.

    :so_raven:
    Brody
  • Ninja Snarl PNinja Snarl P My helmet is my burden. Ninja Snarl: Gone, but not forgotten.Registered User regular
    Carpy wrote: »
    Luckily, in 1996 the Consumer Product Safety Commission voted to introduce a loophole in the law: pajamas didn’t need to be made of fire-resistant fabrics if they were tight-fitting! Tight-fitting pajamas are less flammable because fires need oxygen to burn. So if there is no air between the child’s skin and the fabric, the fire gets less oxygen.

    Wot??

    It's good to know that these things are just a scam to get around liability

    So, their reason is wrong, but the outcome is real thanks to thermal conductivity. It's the paper cup full of water over a candle science experiment, the paper doesn't burn but the water will eventually boil, because the water transfers the heat away from the paper fast enough the paper can't reach its ignition temperature. The same reason you're told to not wear loose fitting clothing in labs when using open flames. You'll still get burned of course because of the heat transfer but the clothing won't ignite.

    I spoke with several experts regarding this very subject when I was working on a clothing burns lawsuit a few years ago. The expert I spoke with said the exact same thing about tight fitting clothing being better than loose. Also that cotton is more flammable than most synthetics.

    It's all a bit vague now, but if you look at the label there's some sort of ASTM standard or something particularly for children's bedclothes.

    Considering cotton is just cellulose, which is itself just a sugar polymer, yeah, cotton is pretty dang flammable. Considering the typical combustion reaction need carbon and oxygen, cotton is pretty great for having a wonderfully combustive ratio of both.

    Elvenshae
  • SummaryJudgmentSummaryJudgment Today we will paint a mountain that owes us nothing. Registered User regular
    Cotton ignites, but synthetics melt :bigfrown:

    Currently between signatures!
    CauldRedTideElvenshae
  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    Wool doesn't, if I remember correctly. We had some merino sleep outfits when our boy was a baby.

    :so_raven:
  • SummaryJudgmentSummaryJudgment Today we will paint a mountain that owes us nothing. Registered User regular
    edited May 2020
    So here's a question

    How do you Ferber train a kid who isn't crying but who will not sleep in her crib

    Do we just exit the room to force start it?

    edit: went with that, when placed into bed she just wanted to play and stay awake.

    we might need to rebuild the crib though.

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  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    So here's a question

    How do you Ferber train a kid who isn't crying but who will not sleep in her crib

    Do we just exit the room to force start it?

    edit: went with that, when placed into bed she just wanted to play and stay awake.

    we might need to rebuild the crib though.

    Don't leave your screwdrivers in the crib next time.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    SummaryJudgmentRedTidelonelyahavaJebus314BrodyElvenshaeHappylilElfNobeard
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