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It's Party Thyme in the [PLANTS] Thread!

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    Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    My wife thinks I we need a privacy fence to protect the neighbors from seeing my garden but I think…

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    …it’s shaping up to be beautiful

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    DidgeridooDidgeridoo Flighty Dame Registered User regular
    I got a bunch of plants yesterday and spent the afternoon sprucing up out little courtyard. My prize acquisition is a dwarf maple that is now my precious child.

    Last night, squirrels went through and wrecked havoc, digging up everything and damaging the base of the tree a bit.

    I am now at war. The first volley has been fired, with cayenne sprinkled generously over all the pots. Hopefully that actually does something, or at least makes the squirrels unhappy

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    ThroThro pgroome@penny-arcade.com Registered User regular
    Didgeridoo wrote: »
    I got a bunch of plants yesterday and spent the afternoon sprucing up out little courtyard. My prize acquisition is a dwarf maple that is now my precious child.

    Last night, squirrels went through and wrecked havoc, digging up everything and damaging the base of the tree a bit.

    I am now at war. The first volley has been fired, with cayenne sprinkled generously over all the pots. Hopefully that actually does something, or at least makes the squirrels unhappy
    Of all the animals that have destroyed my gardening attempts over the years, it's squirrels that have been the worst. Everything else, I get it, I planted food and they like eating food. Some I wish would at least wait for the plants to become food for both of us instead of eating the plant (looking at you, rabbits and field mice that chopped down my tiny corn while they were still sprouts).
    But squirrels man, those assholes. They just dig up anywhere that looks like it was disturbed recently or something. I transplant sprouts down and they're dug back up (and most are dead) within a day. They don't even eat them! They just, unplant them! There's nothing in the ground for you squirrels please wait until there's tomatoes and just steal some then!
    Careful leaf and detritus placement as camouflage works, sometimes. I should try cayenne too. Really don't want to go through the effort of placing squirrel cages over everything.

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    BullheadBullhead Registered User regular
    Yeah we had a nice baby Mango tree growing on our porch, and those fuckers dug it up and ate the roots, killing it. Death to Squirrels!

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    Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    Holy shit have there been a lot of threads since this was last updated

    Anyway, the garden is coming along, I’m trying a lot of techniques

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    Different container types (bush and indeterminate tomatoes, bush varieties of cukes and zukes, a million different herbs like the delightfully-named horehound and tulsi basil which smells like bubblegum)

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    Both in-ground and raised beds, with a big emphasis on vertical gardening. The shade clothe apparatus needs some work….

    And all organic, pesticide-free, so I’ve planted a lot of host plants for beneficials, and found my first assassin bug nymph yesterday protecting my tomatoes

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    I had no idea what it was at first and tbh en figured out it’s the last stage before becoming an adult wheel bug. These guys are the best-
    wikipedia wrote:
    North American wheel bugs are highly regarded by organic gardeners because they consume a variety of insects and their presence indicates a healthy, pesticide-free ecosystem. "They're the lion or the eagle of your food web," Dr. Michael J. Raupp, an entomologist at the University of Maryland, notes. "They sit on top. When you have these big, ferocious predators in your landscape, that tells me that this is a very healthy landscape, because all these other levels in your food web are intact."

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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Looking good.

    I should take some pics of my veg garden. A lot of it is looking a bit pathetic though because the last couple of months have been grim here. My tomatoes are barely a foot high when they should be 3-4 feet by now, and my squash and beans are looking really sad because it's been getting so cold at night.

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    Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    edited July 4
    Harvesting is in full swing- now I just need to figure out what to do with 2 zucchinis, 5 cucumbers, 4 peppers, and a handful of basil every day- I guess grilled zuke and a ~Greek salad every day?

    And that’s just the warm up act for the 18 6’ tomato plants all holding green fruit at the moment….

    Captain Inertia on
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    Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    Also ate some nasturtium fresh off the plant with my daughter, love edible flowers that host the wasp that lays its parasitic eggs on the tomato hornworm

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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Harvesting is in full swing- now I just need to figure out what to do with 2 zucchinis, 5 cucumbers, 4 peppers, and a handful of basil every day- I guess grilled zuke and a ~Greek salad every day?

    And that’s just the warm up act for the 18 6’ tomato plants all holding green fruit at the moment….

    Gin & tonics!

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    ApocalyptusApocalyptus Registered User regular
    When in doubt, you can always pickle/ferment excess produce!
    My window/balcony chilli plants insist on producing practically year round so I've always got some jars of chillis and garlic in brine in my fermentation station going, to eventually be blended up into aged hot sauce. It makes a nice thing to give away to friends, and it's received rave reviews from everyone who's tried it so far.
    Even the excess spicy brine is nice to add to salad dressings, sprinkle over eggs, stir into bloody marys etc.

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    MillMill Registered User regular
    Also worth keeping in mind, that squash flowers are edible. So you can always just harvest the flowers and use them in various dishes, as another means to control how many squash, zucchinis and pumpkins you end with. Heck, also just a good use of the plants if you don't have any female flowers on your vines and just have a bunch of male flowers that aren't going to do anything for you.

    I mean, sure they feed pollinators, but it's always nice to get something out of your edible plants.

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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    edited July 9
    I think my aubergine (eggplant) and courgette (zucchini) plants need to have a meeting and decide whether we're going for giant or miniature fruit this year.

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    Brovid Hasselsmof on
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    Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    I can taste that picture

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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    If you have any suggestions of what to do with excess courgette, hit me. I've been making fritters with it but I'm open to other ideas

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    TynnanTynnan seldom correct, never unsure Registered User regular
    Zucchini bread!

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    JedocJedoc In the scuppers with the staggers and jagsRegistered User regular
    Soup! And since you're blending it all up anyway, you can chop it up and freeze it flat-packed in a gallon ziploc and have soup fixins ready for the cozy months.

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    Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    If you have any suggestions of what to do with excess courgette, hit me. I've been making fritters with it but I'm open to other ideas

    I love it I either roast or saute or stir fry it in every dinner. You can julienne it to use as noodles (or use a cheap tool that does this for more uniformity). You can also use a wide peeler to cut “lasagna” type noodles.

    You can grate it as well before cooking so it blends a little better with other ingredients, such as:
    1. Grate a courgette onto a plate with a paper towel on it, add a pinch of salt, and let it drain
    2. Heat a pan, add oil, shallot until soft and fragrant, then the courgette “rice” with like corn and scallions
    3. Season with chili powder and s&p

    You can also use the grated courgette as a “base” for a frittata- after you cook it down so most of the moisture is gone, spread it out evenly and pour your whisked eggs over

    Also bake it as mentioned

    I love this shit

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    Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    I just planted my first row of beets so I have about 50 days to learn what to do with beets

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    ArtereisArtereis Registered User regular
    edited July 9
    My sichuan pepper trees are doing great this year. They're setting up to give me all the numby goodness this Fall.

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    Artereis on
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    Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    I did zoodles tonight! Chicken satay with zucchini noodles and tomato/cucumber

    2 fresh zucchini picked this morning, the last snow peas from my spring crop, chopped carrots from the deck containers, and a cuke from the garden

    The sauce was soy/peanut butter/rice vinegar/garlic/ginger/lime juice

    Garnished with cilantro and crushed peanuts

    Will make again

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    ApocalyptusApocalyptus Registered User regular
    edited July 18
    If you have any suggestions of what to do with excess courgette, hit me. I've been making fritters with it but I'm open to other ideas

    I remember when I was living in a sharehouse with a bumper crop of delicious gigantic home grown zucchini I made a lot of zucchini topped pizza and garlickly sauteed zucchini with pasta.
    I also love a zucchini slice, and grated zucchini is actually really good in desserts such as chocolate cake (same with beetroot) to add moisture and some secret nutrition.

    Apocalyptus on
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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Ooh I have a lot of beetroot, I should definitely make a beetroot chocolate cake

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