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We'll never be free of [Twitter]'s wretched curse

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    minor incidentminor incident expert in a dying field njRegistered User regular
    Jokerman wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    As a British I'm a little weirded out by a soup that is apparently one third fat by volume

    Anyway what you are you all doing cooking, don't you know you'll never be as efficient at it as a professional


    This tweet has lived rent free on repeat in my head all morning what the fuck

    It's an interesting point made in the most Twitter way possible

    Economies of scale could create a more time efficient way to feed the population, but that assumes that enough people want to live like that and that it would make an appreciable difference to costs to the individual

    More communal cooking within populations could be a good thing, depending on who you live with - having a dinner club in apartment blocks or workplaces, for example

    Your point is good, but the tweeter’s point is very bad, because he specifically says “when restaurants exist”. Restaurants don’t provide those benefits at all (in the West, at least). It’s a standard internet dipshit oversimplified sweeping generalization with no basis in reality.

    But also, the original tweeter seems silly too, because there already is an affordable alternative to gas stoves that provides a significantly better cooking experience.

    Ah, it stinks, it sucks, it's anthropologically unjust
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    DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    I hate the US power grid and how expensive electricity is

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    JokermanJokerman Everything EverywhereRegistered User regular
    a big communal neighborhood kitchen could own actually imho

    I love the idea of like...a dining hall where you could get like a 3 dollar meal of rice and beans or lentils or something like that, and its in every apartment, in every city block. Can't cook? Don't know how to cook? Get some cheap protein!

    I hate the idea that my apartment having a kitchen is a waste of resources because I cannot provide the economies of scale of a restaurant or a chain.

    also, lol that this guy thinks that there isn't massive fucking wastes in a commercial kitchen.


    I don't know about the thought of a communal kitchen because in every communal space I've ever shared keeping people accountable to keeping the kitchen clean and organized is a fucking nightmare.

    JENNA LABEL YOUR FUCKING SHIT! I SHOULDN'T HAVE TO GUESS HOW OLD THIS FOOD IS. ALSO STOP LEAVING YOUR FUCKING BREAKFAST SHIT IN THE SINK AFTER I GO TO WORK! IF YOU'VE GOT TIME TO HAVE BREAKFAST WASHUP AFTER. I COME IN AT 5 AND THERES FUCKING OATMEAL TURNED TO CONCRETE IN MY SINK? WHY WOULD YOU DO THIS TO ME JENNA!

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    NarbusNarbus Registered User regular
    edited January 2023


    I found this tagged as "two brains rotting from opposite directions"

    Narbus on
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    Magic PinkMagic Pink Tur-Boner-Fed Registered User regular
    Mortal Sky wrote: »
    I know that particular tiktok is bait but I really did meet a girl once from Leeds who earnestly thought black pepper was too spicy

    black pepper is absolutely too spicy for me.

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    BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
    edited January 2023
    zloop

    Brolo on
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    MaddocMaddoc I'm Bobbin Threadbare, are you my mother? Registered User regular
    Rational brain: It's all fake, the angrier I get the more he wins, these are not genuine reactions they are bait
    Animal brain: This motherfucker's startled by POTATOES

    My cat got startled by a potato once

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    DiarmuidDiarmuid Amazing Meatball Registered User regular
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    minor incidentminor incident expert in a dying field njRegistered User regular
    “Why am I mad at you?? You should know what you did!”

    Ah, it stinks, it sucks, it's anthropologically unjust
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    ChallChall Registered User regular
    Diarmuid wrote: »

    I'll translate:

    Long standing: Elon came up with this yesterday and never put it in writing

    API Rules: Pay Elon more money

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    OghulkOghulk Tinychat Janitor TinychatRegistered User regular
    Jokerman wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    As a British I'm a little weirded out by a soup that is apparently one third fat by volume

    Anyway what you are you all doing cooking, don't you know you'll never be as efficient at it as a professional


    This tweet has lived rent free on repeat in my head all morning what the fuck

    It's an interesting point made in the most Twitter way possible

    Economies of scale could create a more time efficient way to feed the population, but that assumes that enough people want to live like that and that it would make an appreciable difference to costs to the individual

    More communal cooking within populations could be a good thing, depending on who you live with - having a dinner club in apartment blocks or workplaces, for example

    Your point is good, but the tweeter’s point is very bad, because he specifically says “when restaurants exist”. Restaurants don’t provide those benefits at all (in the West, at least). It’s a standard internet dipshit oversimplified sweeping generalization with no basis in reality.

    But also, the original tweeter seems silly too, because there already is an affordable alternative to gas stoves that provides a significantly better cooking experience.

    Restaurants do not by necessity generate economies of scale, that's not their purpose, so it seems weird for any "economist" to point to that as a reason to not do home cooking.

    Like, in China most everyone eats out because that's culturally (and spatially) the mode of production but it doesn't speak to anything about economies of scale.

    In the US it's not likely more efficient in any way when you account for both the cost of the goods and the time needed to produce.

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    OghulkOghulk Tinychat Janitor TinychatRegistered User regular
    Basically it assumes profit margins for restaurants are very good (which is what economies of scale do -- increase margins) but they're actually terrible so like ???

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    rhylithrhylith Death Rabbits HoustonRegistered User regular
    The responses by Brits in this thread are tellin me y’all need an emergency introduction of Cajun food into your lives.

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    OghulkOghulk Tinychat Janitor TinychatRegistered User regular
    Look, here is my fool proof recommendation for spicing up your sex food life

    Get some cumin

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    milskimilski Poyo! Registered User regular
    edited January 2023
    Oghulk wrote: »
    Jokerman wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    As a British I'm a little weirded out by a soup that is apparently one third fat by volume

    Anyway what you are you all doing cooking, don't you know you'll never be as efficient at it as a professional


    This tweet has lived rent free on repeat in my head all morning what the fuck

    It's an interesting point made in the most Twitter way possible

    Economies of scale could create a more time efficient way to feed the population, but that assumes that enough people want to live like that and that it would make an appreciable difference to costs to the individual

    More communal cooking within populations could be a good thing, depending on who you live with - having a dinner club in apartment blocks or workplaces, for example

    Your point is good, but the tweeter’s point is very bad, because he specifically says “when restaurants exist”. Restaurants don’t provide those benefits at all (in the West, at least). It’s a standard internet dipshit oversimplified sweeping generalization with no basis in reality.

    But also, the original tweeter seems silly too, because there already is an affordable alternative to gas stoves that provides a significantly better cooking experience.

    Restaurants do not by necessity generate economies of scale, that's not their purpose, so it seems weird for any "economist" to point to that as a reason to not do home cooking.

    Like, in China most everyone eats out because that's culturally (and spatially) the mode of production but it doesn't speak to anything about economies of scale.

    In the US it's not likely more efficient in any way when you account for both the cost of the goods and the time needed to produce.

    Yeah, bullshit number time, the economies of scale for food 80% come from the production of raw ingredients, which is the same for you and restaurants, 19% come from not making so much it can't be finished, which comes from not living alone and isn't improved by restaurants and their gigaportions, and like 1% come from the fact that your spice rack might have some rosemary that expires before you cook the twenty steaks and 50 lbs of potatoes you'd need to get rid of it.

    milski on
    I ate an engineer
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    Indie WinterIndie Winter die Krähe Rudi Hurzlmeier (German, b. 1952)Registered User regular
    a6wgevyws3uf.png

    wY6K6Jb.gif
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    japanjapan Registered User regular
    A restaurant concerned about economies of scale is an institutional canteen

    Moreover I'm really not convinced that the people cooking in a lot of restaurants are necessarily better at it than I am

    Fine dining, sure, but that's not even close to "most restaurants"

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    BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User, Moderator mod
    I hear if you go on the F-Zero ride you get lost for over ten years, and when it’s over the staff cannot perceive you by any means.

    I want to understand this joke someone explain it to me

    BahamutZERO.gif
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    Johnny ChopsockyJohnny Chopsocky Scootaloo! We have to cook! Grillin' HaysenburgersRegistered User regular
    I hear if you go on the F-Zero ride you get lost for over ten years, and when it’s over the staff cannot perceive you by any means.

    I want to understand this joke someone explain it to me

    There were F-Zero games, and then Nintendo decided "No. No more. Not ever"

    ygPIJ.gif
    Steam ID XBL: JohnnyChopsocky PSN:Stud_Beefpile WiiU:JohnnyChopsocky
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    DiarmuidDiarmuid Amazing Meatball Registered User regular
    Nintendo hasn't made a F-Zero game in a long time.

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    BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User, Moderator mod
    Thank you!

    BahamutZERO.gif
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    milskimilski Poyo! Registered User regular
    japan wrote: »
    A restaurant concerned about economies of scale is an institutional canteen

    Moreover I'm really not convinced that the people cooking in a lot of restaurants are necessarily better at it than I am

    Fine dining, sure, but that's not even close to "most restaurants"

    The trick isn't that the food they serve is better than the food you can cook, the trick is that the food they serve is better than the food you can cook in 20-30 minutes while getting all the sides and different mains served at once. The curse of many a would-be restaurant owner is thinking that their ability to make the best food for their family, with unlimited time, can translate to making that food for money with all the budgetary and time restrictions that entails.

    Also, I don't trust myself to move knives quickly near my fingers!

    I ate an engineer
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    Rhesus PositiveRhesus Positive GNU Terry Pratchett Registered User regular
    I worked at a business that had a canteen for a while

    I miss it

    The café in our building has started doing soup and a roll for £1 on Thursdays, though

    [Muffled sounds of gorilla violence]
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    Grey GhostGrey Ghost Registered User regular
    Eggs and sausaaaaage, and a side of toast
    Coffee and a rolllllll

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    DarmakDarmak RAGE vympyvvhyc vyctyvyRegistered User regular
    milski wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    A restaurant concerned about economies of scale is an institutional canteen

    Moreover I'm really not convinced that the people cooking in a lot of restaurants are necessarily better at it than I am

    Fine dining, sure, but that's not even close to "most restaurants"

    The trick isn't that the food they serve is better than the food you can cook, the trick is that the food they serve is better than the food you can cook in 20-30 minutes while getting all the sides and different mains served at once. The curse of many a would-be restaurant owner is thinking that their ability to make the best food for their family, with unlimited time, can translate to making that food for money with all the budgetary and time restrictions that entails.

    Also, I don't trust myself to move knives quickly near my fingers!

    Yeah, I'm super slow when using a knife because I'm so scared of cutting myself. Always have been, but even moreso now that I'm on anticoagulants. My wife bought me some of those gloves that are supposed to protect your hands from blades but I never think to use them.

    JtgVX0H.png
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    milskimilski Poyo! Registered User regular
    Darmak wrote: »
    milski wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    A restaurant concerned about economies of scale is an institutional canteen

    Moreover I'm really not convinced that the people cooking in a lot of restaurants are necessarily better at it than I am

    Fine dining, sure, but that's not even close to "most restaurants"

    The trick isn't that the food they serve is better than the food you can cook, the trick is that the food they serve is better than the food you can cook in 20-30 minutes while getting all the sides and different mains served at once. The curse of many a would-be restaurant owner is thinking that their ability to make the best food for their family, with unlimited time, can translate to making that food for money with all the budgetary and time restrictions that entails.

    Also, I don't trust myself to move knives quickly near my fingers!

    Yeah, I'm super slow when using a knife because I'm so scared of cutting myself. Always have been, but even moreso now that I'm on anticoagulants. My wife bought me some of those gloves that are supposed to protect your hands from blades but I never think to use them.

    Most things are fine, like a cucumber or something is pretty easy to keep moving and stay stable. For me, the biggest knife fear is onions. I want onions in everything, but even chopped in half first, trying to move quick with them is a recipe for the knife to deflect off the curve, so I just buy prechopped up onions like a coward.

    I ate an engineer
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    JokermanJokerman Everything EverywhereRegistered User regular
    japan wrote: »
    A restaurant concerned about economies of scale is an institutional canteen

    Moreover I'm really not convinced that the people cooking in a lot of restaurants are necessarily better at it than I am

    Fine dining, sure, but that's not even close to "most restaurants"

    You could probably cook a lot of fine dining stuff.

    After working in hotels with 5 star restaurants I'm just like "Huh, so it's just fancy produce and Sous vide. Neet."

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    OghulkOghulk Tinychat Janitor TinychatRegistered User regular
    milski wrote: »
    Darmak wrote: »
    milski wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    A restaurant concerned about economies of scale is an institutional canteen

    Moreover I'm really not convinced that the people cooking in a lot of restaurants are necessarily better at it than I am

    Fine dining, sure, but that's not even close to "most restaurants"

    The trick isn't that the food they serve is better than the food you can cook, the trick is that the food they serve is better than the food you can cook in 20-30 minutes while getting all the sides and different mains served at once. The curse of many a would-be restaurant owner is thinking that their ability to make the best food for their family, with unlimited time, can translate to making that food for money with all the budgetary and time restrictions that entails.

    Also, I don't trust myself to move knives quickly near my fingers!

    Yeah, I'm super slow when using a knife because I'm so scared of cutting myself. Always have been, but even moreso now that I'm on anticoagulants. My wife bought me some of those gloves that are supposed to protect your hands from blades but I never think to use them.

    Most things are fine, like a cucumber or something is pretty easy to keep moving and stay stable. For me, the biggest knife fear is onions. I want onions in everything, but even chopped in half first, trying to move quick with them is a recipe for the knife to deflect off the curve, so I just buy prechopped up onions like a coward.

    It's a double-edged sword

    To cut the onion cleanly you need a sharper knife which maybe lowers the risk of a deflection but increases the damage done if it happens

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    BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User, Moderator mod
    Just take it slow on onions imo

    BahamutZERO.gif
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    TynnanTynnan seldom correct, never unsure Registered User regular
    I find it interesting that one of the brain-rotted's arguments is that nailing a sous vide recipe is somehow a difficult ordeal.

    I have an anova. You look up the time and temperature for your recipe, you put your recipe in a bag, and you apply the time and temperature to the bag. Boom nailed it.

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    minor incidentminor incident expert in a dying field njRegistered User regular
    The most dangerous tool in a kitchen is a dull knife.

    Well, that and a pot of hot liquid.

    Those two account for like 80% of commercial kitchen injuries in my experience.

    Ah, it stinks, it sucks, it's anthropologically unjust
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    DarmakDarmak RAGE vympyvvhyc vyctyvyRegistered User regular
    Oghulk wrote: »
    milski wrote: »
    Darmak wrote: »
    milski wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    A restaurant concerned about economies of scale is an institutional canteen

    Moreover I'm really not convinced that the people cooking in a lot of restaurants are necessarily better at it than I am

    Fine dining, sure, but that's not even close to "most restaurants"

    The trick isn't that the food they serve is better than the food you can cook, the trick is that the food they serve is better than the food you can cook in 20-30 minutes while getting all the sides and different mains served at once. The curse of many a would-be restaurant owner is thinking that their ability to make the best food for their family, with unlimited time, can translate to making that food for money with all the budgetary and time restrictions that entails.

    Also, I don't trust myself to move knives quickly near my fingers!

    Yeah, I'm super slow when using a knife because I'm so scared of cutting myself. Always have been, but even moreso now that I'm on anticoagulants. My wife bought me some of those gloves that are supposed to protect your hands from blades but I never think to use them.

    Most things are fine, like a cucumber or something is pretty easy to keep moving and stay stable. For me, the biggest knife fear is onions. I want onions in everything, but even chopped in half first, trying to move quick with them is a recipe for the knife to deflect off the curve, so I just buy prechopped up onions like a coward.

    It's a double-edged sword

    To cut the onion cleanly you need a sharper knife which maybe lowers the risk of a deflection but increases the damage done if it happens

    Yeah, my wife bought some nice knives and keeps em sharp, so the only things I have issues with cutting are things like, I dunno, tomatoes for some reason (the skins resist the knife and squish the meat around them, it's annoying). There were several big fuckin carrots the other night that were a pain in the ass to chop, I think them being so fibrous plus girthy was the issue. I wanted to take a cleaver to em by the end, it was like trying to cut wood. Soft wood, but still wood.

    JtgVX0H.png
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    minor incidentminor incident expert in a dying field njRegistered User regular
    Tynnan wrote: »
    I find it interesting that one of the brain-rotted's arguments is that nailing a sous vide recipe is somehow a difficult ordeal.

    I have an anova. You look up the time and temperature for your recipe, you put your recipe in a bag, and you apply the time and temperature to the bag. Boom nailed it.

    Yeah, that one's funny because the entire point of sous vide is that it's easy and reliably repeatable for basically anyone. It's not a difficult technique you have to spend 12 years studying under a monk to learn.

    Ah, it stinks, it sucks, it's anthropologically unjust
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    OghulkOghulk Tinychat Janitor TinychatRegistered User regular
    Darmak wrote: »
    Oghulk wrote: »
    milski wrote: »
    Darmak wrote: »
    milski wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    A restaurant concerned about economies of scale is an institutional canteen

    Moreover I'm really not convinced that the people cooking in a lot of restaurants are necessarily better at it than I am

    Fine dining, sure, but that's not even close to "most restaurants"

    The trick isn't that the food they serve is better than the food you can cook, the trick is that the food they serve is better than the food you can cook in 20-30 minutes while getting all the sides and different mains served at once. The curse of many a would-be restaurant owner is thinking that their ability to make the best food for their family, with unlimited time, can translate to making that food for money with all the budgetary and time restrictions that entails.

    Also, I don't trust myself to move knives quickly near my fingers!

    Yeah, I'm super slow when using a knife because I'm so scared of cutting myself. Always have been, but even moreso now that I'm on anticoagulants. My wife bought me some of those gloves that are supposed to protect your hands from blades but I never think to use them.

    Most things are fine, like a cucumber or something is pretty easy to keep moving and stay stable. For me, the biggest knife fear is onions. I want onions in everything, but even chopped in half first, trying to move quick with them is a recipe for the knife to deflect off the curve, so I just buy prechopped up onions like a coward.

    It's a double-edged sword

    To cut the onion cleanly you need a sharper knife which maybe lowers the risk of a deflection but increases the damage done if it happens

    Yeah, my wife bought some nice knives and keeps em sharp, so the only things I have issues with cutting are things like, I dunno, tomatoes for some reason (the skins resist the knife and squish the meat around them, it's annoying). There were several big fuckin carrots the other night that were a pain in the ass to chop, I think them being so fibrous plus girthy was the issue. I wanted to take a cleaver to em by the end, it was like trying to cut wood. Soft wood, but still wood.

    I got a new knife set for Christmas and a serrated utility knife is the golden angel of tomato cutting. The serrated edge will get through the skin no problem, and it's not so big that you look like you're using a bread knife to cut a tomato (yes I have done this).

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    minor incidentminor incident expert in a dying field njRegistered User regular
    Darmak wrote: »
    Oghulk wrote: »
    milski wrote: »
    Darmak wrote: »
    milski wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    A restaurant concerned about economies of scale is an institutional canteen

    Moreover I'm really not convinced that the people cooking in a lot of restaurants are necessarily better at it than I am

    Fine dining, sure, but that's not even close to "most restaurants"

    The trick isn't that the food they serve is better than the food you can cook, the trick is that the food they serve is better than the food you can cook in 20-30 minutes while getting all the sides and different mains served at once. The curse of many a would-be restaurant owner is thinking that their ability to make the best food for their family, with unlimited time, can translate to making that food for money with all the budgetary and time restrictions that entails.

    Also, I don't trust myself to move knives quickly near my fingers!

    Yeah, I'm super slow when using a knife because I'm so scared of cutting myself. Always have been, but even moreso now that I'm on anticoagulants. My wife bought me some of those gloves that are supposed to protect your hands from blades but I never think to use them.

    Most things are fine, like a cucumber or something is pretty easy to keep moving and stay stable. For me, the biggest knife fear is onions. I want onions in everything, but even chopped in half first, trying to move quick with them is a recipe for the knife to deflect off the curve, so I just buy prechopped up onions like a coward.

    It's a double-edged sword

    To cut the onion cleanly you need a sharper knife which maybe lowers the risk of a deflection but increases the damage done if it happens

    Yeah, my wife bought some nice knives and keeps em sharp, so the only things I have issues with cutting are things like, I dunno, tomatoes for some reason (the skins resist the knife and squish the meat around them, it's annoying). There were several big fuckin carrots the other night that were a pain in the ass to chop, I think them being so fibrous plus girthy was the issue. I wanted to take a cleaver to em by the end, it was like trying to cut wood. Soft wood, but still wood.

    An absolutely razor sharp knife can do a decent job on tomatoes, but I started using my serrated bread knife on them a long time ago after someone I was working with showed me and it's just so much easier.

    Ah, it stinks, it sucks, it's anthropologically unjust
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    Magic PinkMagic Pink Tur-Boner-Fed Registered User regular
    Darmak wrote: »
    [squish the meat

    big fuckin

    fibrous plus girthy

    Soft wood, but still wood.

    *sweats profusely* i'm sorry what are we talking about again

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    TynnanTynnan seldom correct, never unsure Registered User regular
    Tynnan wrote: »
    I find it interesting that one of the brain-rotted's arguments is that nailing a sous vide recipe is somehow a difficult ordeal.

    I have an anova. You look up the time and temperature for your recipe, you put your recipe in a bag, and you apply the time and temperature to the bag. Boom nailed it.

    Yeah, that one's funny because the entire point of sous vide is that it's easy and reliably repeatable for basically anyone. It's not a difficult technique you have to spend 12 years studying under a monk to learn.

    It's also reasonably affordable now. There are a bunch of stick circulators on the market that do a good enough job clipped to your stockpot, and they're about $150 one-time cost give or take. Comparable or less than a food processor, certainly way less than a stand mixer. You can use freezer bags for the immersion if you void them properly, no need for a vacuum sealer.

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    OghulkOghulk Tinychat Janitor TinychatRegistered User regular
    Like essentially get a serrated steak knife and use that for tomatoes. You can find a non-steak knife serrated utility blade for probably $10 on Amazon. We eat enough tomatoes that it's become the second most used of the knife block for me.

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    minor incidentminor incident expert in a dying field njRegistered User regular
    You call something by a French name and it's instantly 3x more complicated and 4x more expensive.

    It's why you can charge $17 for an order of pomme frites, but only like $5 or so for an order of french fries.

    Ah, it stinks, it sucks, it's anthropologically unjust
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    minor incidentminor incident expert in a dying field njRegistered User regular
    Oghulk wrote: »
    Like essentially get a serrated steak knife and use that for tomatoes. You can find a non-steak knife serrated utility blade for probably $10 on Amazon. We eat enough tomatoes that it's become the second most used of the knife block for me.

    A buddy of mine has this shorty serrated knife from Misen and it rules. I keep meaning to grab one when they have one of their sales because it's a bit much at $80, but I think he got it for like $40 on sale:

    https://misen.com/products/short-serrated-knife

    Ah, it stinks, it sucks, it's anthropologically unjust
This discussion has been closed.